LAPS Linda Briskin image: Faculty of Arts design treatment
spacer
bullet Home / Contact
bullet Curriculum Vitae
bullet Research
bullet Recipient of 2007 University-Wide Teaching Award (pdf)
Courses
bullet SOSC 3800
Development Studies Research Methods
Home
Schedule
spacer

bullet DVST 5100
Conceptual Foundation for Development I

bullet DVST 5121
Tools and Policy Analysis for Development
bullet INTL 5336
Regional Analysis - South Asia
spacer
bullet Course Archives
 

International Development Studies Program
Social Science 3800 6.0A
Development Studies Research Methods

Summer 2012

Section One: Basic Issues in Development Research

Day One (May 7): What is Development Research?    

  • Humphrey, John, “Forty Years of Development Research: transformations and reformations”, IDS Bulletin 38(2), March 2007, pp. 14-19 (available online via Scott).
  • Martinussen, John, Society, State and Market: A Guide to Competing Theories of Development (London: Zed Books, 1997), pp. 1-33.* 
  • Rowlands, Jo, “Beyond the Comfort Zone: some issues, questions, and challenges in thinking about development approaches and methods”, in Eade, Deborah (ed.), Development Methods and Approaches: critical reflections (London: Oxfam, 2003), pp.   1-19.*

Recommended:

  • Booth, David, “Development Research: From Impasse to a New Agenda”, in Schuurman, Frans J (ed.), Beyond the Impasse: New Directions in Development Theory (London: Zed Books, 1993), pp. 49-69.
  • Guijt, Irene and Meera Kaul Shah, “Waking up to Power, Conflict and Process”, in Guijt and Shah (eds.), The Myth of Community: gender issues in participatory development (London: Intermediate Technology Publications 1998), pp. 1-23.

Day Two (May 8): Evaluation Research: understanding the performance of development intervention programs

  • Rubin, Frances, A Basic Guide to Evaluation for Development Workers (London, Oxfam, 1995), pp. 13-18.*
  • Duffy, Katherine, “Evaluating Social Action Programmes”, in Hantrais, Linda and Steen Mangen (eds.), Cross-National Research Methods in the Social Sciences (London: Pinter, 1996): 162-171*.

Strongly Recommended:

  • Roche, Chris, “Impact Assessment: seeing the wood and the trees”, in Eade, Deborah and Ernst Ligteringen (eds.), Debating Development (London: Oxfam International, 2001), pp. 359-76.

Recommended:

  • Berk, Richard A. and Peter H. Rossi, Thinking About Program Evaluation (London: Sage, 1999), pp. 1-34
  • Beaudoux, E et al., Supporting Development Action (London: Macmillan, 1992).
  • Ingersoll, Jasper, “Social Analysis in AID and the World Bank”, in Finsterbusch, Kurt et. al. (eds.), Methods for Social Analysis in Developing Countries (Boulder, CO: Westview, 1990), pp. 19-35.
  • Neubert, Susanne, Social Impact Analysis of Poverty Alleviation Programs and Projects: a contribution to the debate on the methodology of evaluation in development cooperation (London: Frank Cass, 2000), pp. 21-50.
  • Posavac, Emil and Raymond G. Carey, Program Evaluation Methods 5th edition (NJ: Prentice Hall, 1997), pp. 1-20.
  • Krueger, Richard A., Focus Groups: A Practical Guide for Applied Research 2nd edition (London: Sage, 1994).
  • CIDA, Results-Based Management Policy Statement (Hull: CIDA, 1996).

Day Three (May 9): The Scientific Method

  • Babbie and Benaquisto, Chapter 1 (pp. 5-26).
  • Nachmias, David and Chava Nachmias, Research Methods in the Social Sciences (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1976), pp. 3-14. (This book is on reserve at Scott library).

Recommended:

  • Baker, Therese L., Doing Social Research 2nd edition (Toronto: McGraw-Hill, 1994), pp. 40-65.
  • Brown, Kathleen et, al., Research Methods in Human Development, 2nd edition (CA: California State University, 1999).

Day Four (May 10): Varieties of Social Science Research

  • Babbie and Benaquisto, Chapter 2 (pp. 32-41).
  • Baker, Therese L., Doing Social Research 2nd edition (Toronto: McGraw-Hill, 1994), pp. 7-39. (This book is on reserve at Scott library).

Day Five (May 14): Basic Elements of Research

  • Babbie and Benaquisto, Chapter 2 (pp. 41-56) & Chapter 5 (pp. 116-132).

Strongly Recommended:

  • Gibbs, Jack P., “Conceptualization of Terrorism”, in Wysocki, Diane Kholos (ed.), Readings in Social Research Methods, 2nd edition (Toronto: Thomson, 2004): 104-110.

Recommended:

  • Nachmias, David and Chava Nachmias, Research Methods in the Social Sciences (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1976), pp. 15-29.
  • Brown, Kathleen et, al., Research Methods in Human Development, 2nd edition (CA: California State University, 1999).

Day Six (May 15): The Research Design

  • Babbie and Benaquisto, Chapter 4 (pp.79 -112).

Strongly recommended:

  • Punch, Keith F, Introduction to Social Research: quantitative and Qualitative Approaches, 2nd edition, (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2005): 62-84.

Recommended:

  • Alasuutari, Pertti, Researching Culture: Qualitative Method and Cultural Studies (London: Sage, 1995), pp. 158-175.
  • Baker, Therese L., Doing Social Research 2nd edition (Toronto: McGraw-Hill, 1994), pp. 91-113.
  • Berg, Bruce, Qualitative Research Methods for the Social Sciences, 2nd edition (Toronto: Allyn and Bacon, 1989), pp. 14-28.
  • Bernard, Russell H, Research Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches 2nd edition (London: Altamira, 1994), pp. 19-50.
  • Nachmias, David and Chava Nachmias, Research Methods in the Social Sciences (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1976), pp. 29-49.

Section Two: The Methods of Development Research—qualitative techniques

Day Seven (May 16):  Survey and Field Research: questionnaire and interview  

  • Babbie and Benaquisto, Chapter 9.
  • Bailey, Carol A, A Guide to Field Research (Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press, 1996): 1-24*.

Recommended:

  • Seidman, Irving, Interviewing as Qualitative Research: A guide for Researchers in Education and the Social Sciences (New York: Teachers College Press, 1998), pp. 1-21  and  95-110.
  • Babbie, Earl, The Practice of Social Research 7th edition (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing, 1995), pp. 279-304.
  • Herzog, Thomas, Research Methods in the Social Sciences (Toronto: Harper Collins College Publishers, 1996), pp. 110-17.
  • Baker, Therese L., Doing Social Research 2nd edition (Toronto: McGraw-Hill, 1994), pp. 171-205.
  • Brown, Kathleen et, al., Research Methods in Human Development, 2nd edition (CA: California State University, 1999).

Day Eight (May 17): The Logic of Sampling

  • Babbie and Benaquisto, Chapter 7.
  • Wilson, Ian, “Some Practical Sampling Procedures for Development Research”, in Holland, Jeremy and John Campbell (eds.), Methods in Development Research: combining qualitative and quantitative approaches (Warwickshire, UK: ITDG, 2005): 37-52.*

Recommended:

  • Baker, Therese L., Doing Social Research 2nd edition (Toronto: McGraw-Hill, 1994), pp. 141-176.
  • Herzog, Thomas, Research Methods in the Social Sciences (Toronto: Harper Collins College Publishers, 1996), pp. 118-27.

Part I of the survey-based essay (the questionnaire/proposal) is due.

Day Nine (May 21): Victoria Day—No class meeting

Day Ten (May 22): Ethnographic Research

Ethnographic Research

  • Gottlieb, Alma, “Ethnography: theory and methods”, in Perecman, Ellen and Sara R. Curran eds., A Handbook for Social Science Field Research: essays & bibliographic sources on research designs and methods, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2005): 47-68*.
  • de Volo, Lorraine Bayard and Edward Schatz, “From the Inside Out: ethnographic methods in political research”, PS Online: 37(2), April 2004: 267 -271.*

Strongly Recommended:

  • Price, Neil and Kirstan Hawkins, “The Peer Ethnographic Method for Health Research”, in Holland, Jeremy and John Campbell (eds.), Methods in Development Research: combining qualitative and quantitative approaches (Warwickshire, UK: ITDG, 2005): 149-162
  • Goldbart, Juliet and Daniel Hustler, “Ethnography”, in Somekh, Bridget and Cathy Lewin (eds.), Research Methods in the Social Sciences (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2005): 16-23.
  • Schensul, Stephen et al., Essential Ethnographic Methods: Observations, Interviews and Questionnaires (New York: Altamira Press, 1999), pp. 1-7.
  • Ellen, R.F., (ed.), Ethnographic Research: A Guide to General Conduct (London and New York, Academic Press 1984), pp. 63-85 (on reserve).
  • Berg, Bruce, Qualitative Research Methods for the Social Sciences, 2nd edition (Toronto: Allyn and Bacon, 1998), pp. 120-159. (This book can be accessed through Scott’s Reserve Section)

Recommended:

  • Bernard, Russell H, Research Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches 2nd edition (London: Altamira, 1994), pp. 51-70.  
  • Finsterbusch, Kurt and William L. Partridge, “The Development Anthropology Approach”, in Finsterbusch et. al. (eds.), Methods for Social Analysis in Developing Countries (Boulder, CO: Westview, 1990), pp. 55-71.
  • Lansing, Stephen J, Priests and Programmers: Technologies of Power in the Engineered Landscape of Bali (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1991);
  • Murray, Gerald F., “The Domestication of Wood in Haiti: a case study in applied evaluation”, in Robert Wulff and Shirley Fiske (eds.), Anthropological Praxis: Translating Knowledge into Action (Boulder, CO: Westview, 1987), pp. 130-39.

Day Eleven (May 23): Understanding Focus Group Research

  • Kitzinger, Jenny and Rosaline Narbour, “Introduction: the challenge and promise of focus groups”, in  Barbour, Rosaline S and Jenny Kitzinger (eds.), Developing Focus Group Research: politics, theory and practice (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage: 1999): 1-20.*

Strongly Recommended:

  • Short, Susan E., “Focus Group Interviews”, in Perecman, Ellen and Sara Curran, eds., A Handbook for Social Science Field Research, (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage: 2006): 103-16.

Recommended:

  • Fen, Edward, Advanced Focus Groups Research (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage: 2001): 1-47.

Day Twelve (May 24):Mid-term Exam.

Day Thirteen (May 28): Ethical Issues in Social Research

  • Babbie and Benaquisto, Chapter 3.
  • Brydon, Lynne, “Ethical Practices in Doing Development Research”, in Desai, Vandana and Robert B. Potter, eds., Doing Development Research (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage 2006): 25-33.*
  •  Milgram, Stanely, “Problems of Ethics ion Research”, in Wysocki, Diane Kholos (ed.), Readings in Social Research Methods, 2nd edition (Toronto: Thomson, 2004): 66-73.

Strongly Recommended:

  • Curran Sara R., “Ethical Considerations for Research in Cross-Cultural Settings”, Perecman, Ellen and Sara Curran, eds., A Handbook for Social Science Field Research, (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage: 2006): 197-216.

Recommended:

  • Baker, Therese L., Doing Social Research 2nd edition (Toronto: McGraw-Hill, 1994), pp. 66-87.
  • Seidman, Irving, Interviewing as Qualitative Research: a guide for researchers in education and the Social Sciences (New York: Teachers College Press, 1998), pp. 49-60.

Section Three: The New Development Reality--- applied and evaluation research

Day Fourteen (May 29): Evaluation Research

  • Babbie and Benaqusito, Chapter 13; pp. 347-366
  • Rubin, Frances, A Basic Guide to Evaluation for Development Workers (London, Oxfam, 1995), pp. 25-28.*

Recommended:

  • Robson, Colin, Small-Scale Evaluation  (London: Sage Publications, 2002), pp. 6-14.
  • Parashar, R.K., “Evaluating Social-Action Projects in India: guidelines for improving methods and techniques”, in UNESCO, Project Evaluation: problems of methodology (Paris: UNESCO, 1984), pp. 15-54.

Second round of presentation begins

Day Fifteen (May 30): Participatory Development

World Bank, The World Bank Participation Source Book (Washington, D.C.: World Bank, 1994), Chapters 1, 3 & 4: What is participation? Practice Pointers in Participatory Planning and Decision-Making, Practice Pointers in Enabling the Poor to Participate. This book is available free on the web at The World Bank participation sourcebook (English)

Hickey, Sam and Giles Mohan, “Relocating Participation within a Radical Politics of Development”, Development and Change 36(2), March 2005: 237-62. Available online through Scott Library.

Strongly Recommended:

  • Rocheleau, Diane and Rachel Slocum, “Participation in Context: key questions”, in Slocum, Rachel at el. (eds.), Power, Process and Participation: tools for change (London: ITDG Publishing, 1995), pp. 17-30.

Recommended:

  • Chambers, Robert, Whose Reality Counts: putting the first last ((London: ITDG Publishing, 1997).
  • Cornwal, Andrea and Garett Pratt (eds.), Pathways to Participation: reflections on PRA (London: ITDG Publishing, 2003).
  • Picciotto, Robert, Participatory Development: myths and dilemmas (Washington, D.C.: World Bank, 1992).
  • Schneider, Hartmut (ed.), Participatory Development from Advocacy to Action (Paris: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, 1995).

Day Sixteen (May 31): Participatory Action Research

  • Rahman, Muhammad Anisur, People’s Self-Development: perspectives on participatory action research (London: Zed books, 1994), pp. 74-94.*
  • Swantz, Marja-Liisa, “My Road to Participatory Action Research”, in Cornwal, Andrea and Garett Pratt (eds.), Pathways to Participation: reflections on PRA (London: ITDG Publishing, 2003), pp. 196-202.*

Strongly Recommended:

  • Greenwood, Davydd & Morten Levin, Introduction to Action Research: social research for social change, 2nd ed. (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage: 2007): 35-52.

Recommended:

  • Richard and Michael Bassey, “Participatory Action Research in Togo: an inquiry into Maige storage systems”, in Whyte, William Foote (ed.), Participatory Action Research (Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications, 1991), pp. 190-209.
  • Whyte, William Foote (ed.), Participatory Action Research (Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications, 1991).
  • Salmen, Lawrence F., Listen to the People: participant-observer evaluation of development projects (New York: Oxford University Press, 1987).

Day Seventeen (June 4): Participatory Rural Appraisal/Rapid Rural Appraisal

  • Chambers, Robert, “The Origins and Practice of Participatory Rural Appraisal”, World Development 22(7), July 1994: 953-969. Available online through Scott Library.

Recommended:

  • Chambers, Robert, Whose Really Counts: putting the first last (London: ITDG Publishing, 1997), pp. 102-129.
  • Gow, David D., “Rapid Rural Appraisal: social science as investigative journalism”, in Finsterbusch, Kurt et al (eds.), Methods for Social Analysis in Developing Countries (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1990), pp. 143-63.
  • Holland, Jeremy (ed.), Whose Voice: participatory research and policy change (London: Intermediate Technology Publications, 1998).     
  • Smith, L Graham, Impact Assessment and Sustainable Resource Management (New York: Longman, 1993), pp. 13-29.
  • Taylor, Nicholas et al, Social Assessment: theory, process and techniques, Canterbury, New Zealand: Center for Resource Management; Lincoln University, 1992).

Day Eighteen (June 5): Participatory Poverty Assessments: conceptual and methodological issues

Strongly Recommended:

  • Mosse, David. (1994) “Authority, Gender and Knowledge: theoretical reflections on the practice of participatory rural appraisal”, Development and Change25 (3): 497-525.

Recommended:

  • Robb, C. (2002), Can the Poor Influence Policy: participatory poverty Assessments in the developing world, Washington D.C: IMF.
  • Gaventa, J. and Blauert, J. (2000), “Learning to Change by Learning from Change: going to scale with participatory monitoring and evaluation”, in M. Estrella et al, Learning from Change: Lessons and Experiences in Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation,. London: Intermediate Technology Publications.
  • Estrella, M. and J. Gaventa (1998), Who Counts Reality? Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation: a literature review, IDS Working Paper No. 70.
  • McGee, R. and A. Norton (2000), Participation in Poverty Reduction Strategies: a synthesis of experience with participatory approaches to policy design, implementation and monitoring, IDS Working Paper 109.

Day Nineteen (June 6): (Strategic) Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)

  • Forlage, C.A., Environmental Assessment: a practical guide (Aldershot, England: Gower Publishing Company, 1990), pp. 1-12 & 64-81.*
  • Kubrom, Tedros Zeremariam and Nevil Quinn, “An Evaluation of Environmental Impact Assessment in Eritrea”,  Impact Assessment and Project Appraisal 25(1), 2007: 53 -63*

Recommended

  • Canter, Larry, Environmental Impact Assessment, 2nd edition (New York, McGraw-Hill, 1996), pp. 102-121.
  • Ortolano, Leonard and Anne Shepherd, “Environmental Impact Assessment: challenges and opportunities”, Impact Assessment 13(1), 1995, pp. 3-30.

Day Twenty (June 7): Gender Mainstreaming in Development Agencies

  • Moser, Caroline O.N., Gender Planning and Development: theory, practice and training (London and New York: Routledge, 1993), pp. 83-107.*
  • Gwaba, Regis M, “Reflection on PRA, Participation and Gender”, in Andrea Cornwall and Garett Pratt (eds.), Pathways to Participation: reflections on PRA (London: ITDG Publishing, 2003), pp. 88-93.*

Strongly Recommended:

  • Tiessen, Rebecca, Everywhere/Nowhere: gender mainstreaming in development agencies (Bloomfield, CT: Kumarian Press, 2007) (chapter 2).  

Recommended:

  • Moser, Caroline O.N., “Gender Planning in the Third World: meeting practical and gender needs”, World Development 17(11), 1989, pp. 83-107.
  • Verloo, Mieke and Connie Roggeband, “Gender Impact Assessment: the development of a new instrument in the Netherlands”, Impact Assessment, 14(1), March 1996, pp. 3-20.
  • Williams, Suzanne, The Oxfam Gender Training Manual (UK: Oxfam), pp. 291-311.
  • Rao, Aruna et al (eds.), Gender Analysis in Development Planning: a case book (West hartfod, CT: Kumarian Press, 1991), pp. 9-20.
  • Kabeer, Naila, “Gender-Aware Policy and Planning: A Social Relations Perspective”, in Macdonald M (ed.), Gender Planning in Development Agencies: meeting the challenge (London: Oxfam, 1994).
  • Stubbs, Josefina, “Gender in Development: a long haul – but we are getting there!” in Eade, Deborah & Ernst Ligteringen (eds.), Debating Development (UK: Oxfam, 2001), pp. 348-58.
  • Bakker, Isabella (ed.), The Strategic Silence: gender and economic policy (London and Ottawa: Zed Books and the North South Institute, 1994).

Day Twenty One (June 11): Evidence-based Policy-Making I: the logical framework approach

Strongly Recommend

  • Aune, Jens B., “Logical Framework Approach and PRA – mutually exclusive or complementary tools for project planning”, in Eade, Deborah (ed.), Development Methods and Approaches: critical reflections (London: Oxfam2003), pp. 214-219.
  • NORAD, The Logical Framework Approach: handbook for objectives-oriented planning, 4th edition, (Oslo: Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 1999).

Recommended

  • Casley, Dennis J. and Denis A. Lury, Monitoring and Evaluation of Agriculture and Rural Development Projects (Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1982).
  • Akroyd, David, “Logical Framework Approach to Project Planning, Socio-economic Analysis and to Monitoirng and Evaluation Services: a smallholder rice project”, Impact Assessment and Project Appraisal 17(1), 1999, pp. 54-66.
  • William C. Found, Techniques of Project Planning: ten steps to success (Toronto: Institute of Leadership Development, York University, 1999), pp. 59-67.

Survey-based essay is due.

Day Twenty Two (June 12): Evidence-based Policy-Making II: Results-Based Management

  • Hatton, Michael J.  and Kent Schroeder, “Results-based management: friend or foe?”, Development in Practice, 17(3), June 2007: 426 -432 (Available online via Scott)
  • Lavergne, Real, Results-Based Management and Accountability for Enhanced Aid Effectiveness, Mimeo, CIDA, 2002.
    http://www.swisstph.ch/fileadmin/user_upload/Pdfs/swap/swap052e.pdf

Strongly Recommended:

  • Mayne, John , “Challenges and Lessons in Implementing Results-Based Management”, Evaluation, 13(1), January 2007: 87-109 (available online via Scott)
  • Rondinelli, D.A, “Strategic Management in Foreign Aid Agencies: developing a results- based performance system”, International Review of Administrative Sciences 60(3), 1994: 465 -482(available online via Scott).

Recommended:

Day Twenty Three (June 13): Data Preparation, Analysis, and Computerization

  • Babbie and Benaquisto, chapter 15: 397-408 (I would encourage you to read chapter 14 as well)

Day Twenty Four (June 14): FINAL EXAM

*Please note that articles/book chapters with an asterisk mark are included in the Course Kit.

York spacer Copyright © - Fahim Quadir - All rights reserved