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Social Science 2800 6.0A
Development: Comparative and Historical Perspective

Fall 2006 Class Room: Tel 0001
Instructor: Dr. Fahimul Quadir Tuesdays 12:30-2:30
Tel: 66937
E-mail: fquadir@yorku.ca
Office: 323 Founders College
Office Hours: Tuesdays: 9:30 to 11-30 and by appointment

 

TA: Shukria Dini  
Office: FC 309

Office Hours: Tuesdays: 11-30 to 12-30
E-mail: sdini@yorku.ca

TA: David da Silva
Office: FC 309

Office Hours: Thursdays: 11-30 to 12-30

E-mail: DavidDaSilva@osgoode.yorku.ca

 

This course offers a critical overview of the state of Development Studies for those who have some background in International Development. Its primary objective is to familiarize class-members with the present and past development theories, discourses/perspectives and issues. Besides, it makes an effort to analyze the role of key international organizations, such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, in constructing what can be called a 'global framework for development'.

In reviewing a range of theories of and approaches to development - from modernization, and neo-Marxist theories of dependency to neo-liberal, post-modern, post-Marxist and feminist perspectives, the course provides a forum for class-members to examine, discuss, and debate the current changes in Development Studies and to apply various theories and approaches to the analysis of contemporary development issues. Class-members will have the opportunity to explore how the focus of development has recently shifted from 'economic growth' to improving the human conditions.

STRUCTURE OF THE CLASS

This course will be organized around two separate weekly sessions, namely lectures and tutorial meetings. Every Tuesday the class will meet for two hours for lectures of the topic at hand that will serve as the basis for discussions and/or debates. For the purpose of tutorials, the class will be divided into three groups. Each of the group will meet once a week for an hour. The class will use tutorials as an effective forum for debates and discussions. In addition to discussing the assigned readings, tutorial meetings will offer class-members the opportunity to present their ideas, thoughts, and perspectives on various issues, themes, and concepts that are included in the course outline.

In both sessions, the class-members will be able to respond to a broad range of critical issues and challenges facing the world today.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

a) General requirements

Class members are expected to make efforts to do all assigned readings in advance of class and to submit the assignments on time.   They also need to demonstrate interests in the field of Development Studies.

 

b) Specific requirements

 

Participation: Based on careful reading of source materials listed in the course outline, everyone is required to participate in and contribute to both class discussions and presentations.  Participation grades will be based on contributions to class discussions and attendance records.  More than four absences in the entire academic year (2006-07) will result in a failure in the participation mark.

 

 

Book/Article Review: Each class-member will write one review (3 to 4 pages, double-spaced, typed) of a book/book chapter/article listed in the course outline (should you want to write a review of a book or article that is not included in the course outline, you need to get the approval from your course director). The requirements are that, in addition to synthesizing the major points of the chosen review book/article, it should assess the relative strength and weakness of the work under review. The book review will be due on or before October 3, 2006.

 

Essay Proposal: Everyone must submit a brief, no more than 3 pages, proposal which will contain -among other things - a statement of the problem, objectives of the essay, a clearly stated thesis, and an annotated bibliography.  Please keep in mind that your proposal is a formal structure of your research study. The proposal is due on October 24, 2006.  

                           

Research Essay: Each class-member will write a research paper (8 to 10 pages double-spaced typed, including endnotes/footnotes and bibliography) drawing upon both class readings and extensive research on the topic.  The paper is meant to be a critical analysis of a topic to be agreed with the course director.  In order to provide a solid analytical understanding of the chosen topic, you are encouraged to write a case study, focusing on either a country or a topic of your interest. The deadline for the submission of the essay is February 20, 2007.  Late essays will be marked down 5% per day.

 

Examinations: There will be a mid-term and a final examination. The dates for both the mid-term and final exams will be announced by the Registrar’s Office. 

 Academic Integrity Tutorial

Please note that plagiarism is an academic crime. No one will be allowed to paraphrase or copy the words of other authors without providing appropriate citation.

 

All class-members are strongly encouraged to become familiar with appropriate academic practices by visiting the University’s Academic Integrity web site at http://www.yorku.ca/academicintegrity. You must read the section ‘For Students’ and  complete the Academic Integrity Tutorial: http://www.yorku.ca/tutorial/academic_integrity/.  In addition to helping class-members understand various aspects of f academic integrity, this tutorial would play an important role in assuring that class-members do not breach the Senate Policy on Academic Honesty.

  

GRADE DISTRIBUTION     

             

Book Review:                               10%

Essay Proposal:                             10%

Essay:                                           20%

Mid-term:                                      20%

Final Exam:                                    25%

              Participation and

              Attendance (which will include

both lectures and tutorial

meetings):                                     15%

 

 

Please note that non-submission of work without an approved extension from the instructor will be accredited with the mark of "0". In order to receive a final grade, the class-member will have to receive a grade in each of the distributions noted above.

 

Missed Exam policies

 

The class will adopt Professor Canel’s missed exam guidelines which can be found at  http://www.arts.yorku.ca/sosc/ecanel/policies.html.

  

REQUIRED TEXT

  • Vandana Desai and Robert B. Potter (eds.), The Companion to Development Studies (London: Arnold, 2002).

 

  • Kothari, Uma and Martin Minogue (eds.), Development Theory in Practice: critical perspectives (London: Palgrave, 2002). 
  • A Course Kit.

 

All of these course materials are available for purchase at the University bookstore.

 

OTHER READINGS

In addition to the assigned course reader, this course will also use the following books as supplementary texts (alphabetically organized):

 

  • Allen, Tim and Alan Thomas, Poverty and Development into the 21st Century (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000);
  • Black, Jean Knippers, Development in Theory and Practice: Paradigms and Paradoxes 2nd edition (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1999);
  • Blomstrom, Magnus and Bjorn Hettne, Development Theory in Transition: the dependency debate and beyond (London: Zed Books, 1984);
  • Brecher, Jeremy and Tim Costello, Global Village or Global Pillage: economic reconstruction from the bottom up 2nd edition (Boston: South End Press, 1998);
  • Broad, Robin, Unequal Alliance: the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the Philippines (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1988);
  • Cohen, Jean and Andrew Arato, Civil Society and Political Theory (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1992);
  • Cown, Michael and R. W. Shenton, Doctrines of Development (London: Rotledge, 1996);
  • Dube, S.C., Modernization and Development: the search for alternative paradigms (London: Zed Books, 1990);
  • Haq, Mahbub ul, Reflections on Human Development (New York: Oxford University Press, 1995);
  • Khor, Martin, Rethinking Globalization: critical issues and policy choices (Halifax: Fernwood, 2001);
  • Klein, Naomi, No Logo: taking aim at brand bullies (Toronto: Alfred A. Knopf, 1999)
  • Lechner, Frank J. and John Boli (eds.), The Globalization Reader (Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2000);
  • Martin, Hans-Peter and Harald Schumann, The Global Trap: Globalization and the Assault on Democracy and Prosperity (London: Zed Books, 1998);
  • Martinussen, John, Society, State and Market: A Guide to Competing Theories of Development (London: Zed Books, 1997);
  • Munck, Ronaldo, Globalization and Labor (London: Zed Books, 2002);
  • Rahnema, Majid (ed.), The Post-Development Reader (London: Zed Books, 1997);
  • Petras, James and Henry Veltmeyer, Globalization Unmasked: imperialism in the 21st century ((London: Zed Books, 2001).
  • Rist, Gilbert, The History of Development: From Western Origins to Global Faith (London: Zed Books1997);
  • Rapley, John, Understanding Development: theory and practice in the Third World (Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner, 1996)
  • Rivero, Oswaldo De, The Myth of Development: the non-viable economies of the 21st century (London: Zed Books, 2001);
  • Sachs, Wolfgang (ed.), The Development Dictionary (London: Zed Books, 1992);
  • Shutt, Harrry, A New Democracy: alternatives to a bankrupt world order (London: Zed Books, 2001);
  • Sooge, David, Give and Take: what’s the matter with foreign aid (Halifax: Fernwood, 2002)
  • Somjee, A. H., Development Theory: critiques and explorations (London: Macmillan, 1991);
  • Taylor, Rupert, Creating a Better World: interpreting global civil society (Bloomfield, CT: Kumarian, 2004);
  • Toye, John, Dilemmas of Development: reflections of the counter-revolution in development economics (Oxford: Blackwell, 1993);
  • UNDP, Human Development Report 1994 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1994);
  • UNDP, Human Development Report 2003 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2001);
  • Watkins, Kevin, The Oxfam Poverty Report (Dublin: Oxfam, 1995);   
  • World Bank, World Development Reports 2003, 2004 and 2005 (Washington, DC: World Bank);

 

Class members are also expected to keep informed of contemporary issues of development through various journals and periodicals.  A list of relevant major journals is included in the appendix for convenience.

 

Section One: Understanding Development

Week One: The State of Development Studies: Past, Present, and Future            

Desai and Potter, Chapters: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4 and 1.5

Petras, James and Henry Veltmyer, System in Crisis: the dynamics of free market capitalism (Halifax, Fernwood Publishing, 2003), pp. 2-22.*

 

Recommended:

  • Escobar, Arturo, “The Making and Unmaking of the Third World Through Development”, in Rahnema, Majid (ed.), The Post-Development Reader (London: Zed Books, 1997), pp. 85-93.

 

Week Two: What Development Means?   

  • Desai and Potter, Chapters: 1.9, 1.10 and 1.12
  • Rist, Gilbert, The History of Development: from western origins to global faith (London: Zed Books, 1997): 69-79.*
  • Sen, Amartya, Development As Freedom  (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 1999), pp. 13-34.*

Recommended:

  • Allen and Thomas, Poverty and Development into the 21st Century (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000), pp. 23-48.
  • .De Rivero, Oswaldoo, The Myth of Development: the non-viable economies of the 21st centurt (London: Zed Books, 2001).
  • Esteva, Gustavo, “Development”, in Wolfgang Sachs (ed.), The Development Dictionary: a guide to knowledge as power (London: Zed Books, 1992), pp. 6-25.
  • Harris, John, Depoliticizing Development: The World Bank and Social Capital (London: Wimbledon Publishing Company, 2001), pp. 1-13.
  • Haq, Mahbub Ul, Reflections on Human Development (New York: Oxford University Press, 1994), pp. 13-23.
  • Martinussen, Martinussen, John, Society, State and Market: A Guide to Competing Theories of Development (London: Zed Books, 1997), pp. 34-45.
  • UNDP, Human Development Report 1994 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1994), pp. 13-21.

Week Three:    Conceptions and Dimensions of Poverty

 

Recommended:

  • Allen and Thomas, Poverty and Development into the 21st Century (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000), pp. 3-21.
  • Burkett, Paul, “Poverty Crisis in the Third World: The Contradictions of World Bank Policy”, Monthly Review 42(7), December 1990, pp. 20-31.
  • Illich, Ivan, “Development as Planned Poverty”, in Rahnema, Majid (ed.), The Post-Development Reader (London: Zed Books, 1997), pp. 94-101.

Week Four: Measuring Development: Social and Economic Indicators

Payne, Anthony, The Global Politics of Unequal Development (London: Palgrave, 2005):49-72.*

UNDP, Human Development Report 2004 (New York: UNDP, 2004), 139-42.

http://hdr.undp.org/reports/global/2004/pdf/hdr04_HDI.pdf

World Bank, World Development Report 2005 (NY: Oxford University Press, 2004), pp. 253-65.

http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTWDR2005/Resources/complete_report.pdf

 

Book Review Due.

 

Week Five:  Pathways to Development: Modernizing Cultures through Institutional Efforts 

  • Desai and Potter, Chapters: 2.1, 2.4 and 2.5
  • Black, Maggie, The No-Nonsense Guide to International Development (Toronto: Between the Lines): 10-29.*
  • Shrestha, Nanda, “Becoming a Development Category”, in Schech, Susanne and Jane Haggis (eds.), Development: A cultural studies reader (Oxford; UK: Blackwell Publishers): 103-114.*

 

 

Recommended:

  • Blomstrom, Magnus and Bjorn Hettne, Development Theory in Transition: the dependency debate and beyond –Third World responses (London: Zed Books, 1984), pp. 19-26.
  • Dube, S.C., Modernization and Development: the search for alternative paradigms (Tokyo: The United Nations University Press, 1990), pp. 15-34.
  • Martinussen, Martinussen, John, Society, State and Market: A Guide to Competing Theories of Development (London: Zed Books, 1997), pp. 56-72.
  • Rist, Gilbert, The History of Development: from Western origins to global faith (London: Zed Books, 1997), ch. 6 (“Modernization Poised between History and Prophecy”), pp. 93- 108.
  • Leys, Colin, “Samuel Huntington and the End of Classical Modernization Theory”, in Alavi, Hamza and Teodor Shanin (eds.), Introduction to the Sociology of “Developing Societies” (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1982), pp. 332-49.

  

Week Six:  The Failure of Development and the Emergence of the Critical Perspectives 

 

  • Desai and Potter, 2.8, 2.7, 2.9 and 2.10
  • Kothari and Minogue, chapter 1 (“Critical Perspectives on Development: an introduction”): 1-15.
  • Shutt, Harry, A New Democracy: alternatives to a bankrupt world order (London: Zed Books, 2001), pp. 86-105*.

 

Recommended:

  • Blomstrom, Magnus and Bjorn Hettne, Development Theory in Transition: the dependency debate and beyond (London: Zed Books, 1984), pp. 56-78.
  • Martinussen, Martinussen, John, Society, State and Market: A Guide to Competing Theories of Development (London: Zed Books, 1997), pp. 85-100.
  • Frank, Andre Gunder, “The Development of Underdevelopment,” in Stuart Corbridge (ed.), Development Studies: a reader (London: Arnold, 1995), pp. 27-37.
  • Rist, Gilbert, The History of Development: From Western Origins to Global Faith (London: Zed Books, 1997), pp. 109-122.
  • Smith, Tony, “The Underdevelopment of Development Literature: the case of dependency theory”, World Politics 31(2), January 1979, pp. 247-88.
  • Lall, Sanjaya, “Is ‘Dependence’ a Useful Concept in Analyzing Development”, World Development 3, November 1975, pp. 799-810.
  • Packenham, Robert A., The Dependency Movement: Scholarship and Politics in Development Studies (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1992), pp. 7-32.

 

 

 Week Seven:    The New Narratives of Development: Post-Modernism

 

  • Desai and Potter, Chapters 2.2 and 2.13
  • Smart, Barry, Postmodernity (London: Routledge, 1993), pp. 11-39.*

                                                       

Recommended:

  • Esteva, Gustavo and Madhu Suri Prakash, Grassroots Post-Modernism: remaking the soil of cultures (London: Zed Books, 1998), pp. 19-49.
  • Kaufman, Michael, “Community Power, Grassroots Democracy, and the Transformation of Social Life”, in Kaufman, Michael and Dilla Alfonso (eds.), Community Power and Grassroots Democracy: the transformation of social life (London: Zed, 1997), pp. 1-23.
  • Dubois, Marc, “The Governance of the Third World: a Foucaudian perspective on power relations in development”, Alternatives 16, 1991, pp. 1-30.
  • Escobar, Arturo, “Discourse and Power in Development: Michel Foucault and the relevance of his work to the Third World”, Alternatives 10, Winter 1984-85, pp. 377-400.
  • Parpart, Jane L. and Marianne H. Marchand, “Exploring the Canon: an introduction/conclusion”, in Parpart, Jane L and Marianne Marchand (eds.), Feminism /Postmodernism /Development (London: Routledge, 1995).
  • Johnston, Deborah S., “Constructing the Periphery in Modern Global Politics” in Craig N. Murphy and Roger Tooze (eds.), New International Political Economy (Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1991), pp. 149-70.
  • Wood, Ellen, “What is the ‘postmodern’ Agenda? An introduction”, Monthly Review 47(3), July-August 1995, pp. 1-12.

 

Essay Proposal is Due.

 Section Two: The New International Context of Development

 Week Eight: Going Beyond Territorial Boundaries: Understanding Globalization

 

  • Desai and Potter, Chapter s: 4.3 and 4.2
  • Kothari and Minogue, chapter 2 (“The Political Economy of Globalization”): 16-34.

               

Recommended:

Brecher, Jeremy and Tim Costello, Global Village or Global Pillage: economic reconstruction from the bottom up 2nd edition (Boston: South End Press, 1998), pp. 49-63.

  • Ghosh, Jayati, “Globalization, Economic Restructuring and the Implications for Democracy in Developing Countries”, in Quadir, Fahimul and Jayant Lele (eds.), Democracy and Civil Society in Asia, Volume 1 (London: Palgrave and Macmillan, 2004), pp. 29-55.
  • Khor, Martin, Rethinking Globalization: critical issues and policy choices (London: Zed Books, 2001), pp. 7-23
  • Mittelman, James H., “The Dynamics of Globalization”, in Mittelman (ed.), Globalization: critical reflections (Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner, 1997), pp. 1-19.
  • Nayyar, Deepak, “Globalization: the game, the players and the rules”, in Gupta, Satya Dev (ed.), The Political Economy of Globalization (Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997), pp. 13-40.
  • Lechner, Frank J. and John Boli (eds.), The Globalization Reader  (Malden; MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2000); Part I and II (Debating and Explaining Globalization)
  • McGrew, Anthony, “Susuatinable Globalization: the global politics of development and exclusion in the new World Order”, in Tim Allen and Alan Thomas (eds.), Poverty and Development into the 21st Century (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000), pp. 345-64.
  • Sjolander, Claire T., “The Rhetoric of Globalization: what’s in a wor(l)d?”, International Journal 51, Autumn 1996, pp. 603-16.
  • Mann, Michael, “Has Globalization Ended the Rise and Rise of the Nation-state”? Review of International Political Economy 4(3), Autumn 1997, pp. 472-96.
  • Mittelman, James H., “The Globalisation Challenge: surviving at the margins”, Third World Quarterly 15(3), September 1994, pp. 427-44.
  • Bienefeld, Manfred, “The New World Order: echoes of a new imperialism”, Third World Quarterly 15(1), March 1994, pp. 31-48.   
  • Stallings, Barbara (ed.), Global Change, Regional Response: the new international context of development (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995), pp. 349-88.

 

Week Nine:  The Crisis of External Dependence: Foreign Aid and Structural Economic Reforms 

  • Desai and Potter, Chapters: 2.6, 10.2 and 10.3 
  • Kothari and Minogue, chapter 9 (“Neo-liberalism, The World Bank and the New Politics of Development”).
  • Handa, Sudhanshu, “Adjustment with a Human Face? Evidence from Jamaica”, World Development 31(7), July 2003: 1125-45 (available online)

http://scholarsportal.info/pdflinks/05050217542901114.pdf

 

 

Recommended:

  • Black, Maggie, The No-Nonsense Guide to International Development (Toronto: Between the Lines): 30-49Campbell, Bonnie, “New Rules of the Game: The World Bank’s Role in the Construction of New Normative Frameworks for States, Markets and Social Exclusion”, Canadian Journal of Development Studies 21(1), 2000: 7-30.
  • Glover, David, “A Layman’s Guide to Structural Adjustment”, Canadian Journal of Development Studies 12(1), 1991, pp. 173-86.
  • Brecher, Jeremy and Tim Costello, Global Village or Global Pillage: economic reconstruction from the bottom up 2nd edition (Boston: South End Press, 1998), Chapters 2 & 4.
  • Chossudovsky, Michel, The Globalization of Poverty: impacts of IMF and World Bank reforms (London: Zed Books, 1997).
  • Dasgupta, Biplab, Structural Adjustment, Trade and the New Political Economy (London: Zed Books, 1998).
  • Diwan, Romesh, “Economic Reform as Ideology”, Economic and Political Weekly 30(30), 29 July 1995, pp. 73-86.
  • Sogge, David, Given and Take: what is the matter with foreign aid (London: Zed books, 2002), pp. 24-39Stalker, Peter (ed.), “Painful Adjustment: the social costs of structural adjustment” in Peter Stalker (ed.), The States of Disarray (Geneva: UNRISD, 1995), pp. 36-56.
  • Williamson, John, “What Washington Means by Policy Reform” in Williamson (ed.), Latin American Adjustment: how much has happened? (Washington DC: Institute of International Economics, 1990), pp. 8-17.

Week Ten: Moving Toward the Market: Issues of Free Trade and Labor  

  • Deasi and Potter, Chapters: 2.3, 4.4 and 4.5
  • Khor, Martin, Rethinking Globalization: critical issues and policy choices (London: Zed Books, 2001), pp. 27-52*.

 

Strongly Recommended: 

  • Munck, Ronaldo, Globalisatio and Labour: The new ‘great transformation’, (London: Zed Books, 2002): 1-23.

 

Recomended:

  • Brecher, Jeremy and Tim Costello, Global Village or Global Pillage: economic reconstruction from the bottom up 2nd edition (Boston: South End Press, 1998), pp. 67-80.
  • Dasgupta, Biplob, Structural Adjustment, Global Trade and the New Political Economy of Development (London: Zed Books, 1998), pp. 137-206.
  • Khor, Martin, Rethinking Globalization: critical issues and policy choices (London: Zed Books, 2001), pp. 27-52.
  • Klein, Naomi, No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies (New York: Picador, 1999), pp. 231-57.
  • Peter Waterman, Globalization, Social Movements and the New Internationalisms (London: Mansell, 1998), pp. 45-78.
  • Robbins, Richard, Global Problems and the Culture of Capitalism (Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1999), pp. 35-63.
  • Lechner, Frank J. and John Boli (eds.), The Globalization Reader  (Malden; MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2000), pp. 148-190.

 

Week Eleven:  The Decline of National Sovereignty: The Emergence of Transnational Corporations

* Desai and Potter, Chapters: 2.16 and 4.1

* Martinussen, Martinussen, John, Society, State and Market: A Guide to Competing Theories of Development (London: Zed Books, 1997), pp. 114-128.*

 

Recommended:

  • Robbins, Richard, Global Problems and the Culture of Capitalism, pp. 113-44.
  • Carnoy, Martin, “Multinationals in a Changing World Economy: Whither the Nation-State”, in Carnoy et al., The New Global Economy in the Information Age (University Park, Pennsylvania, The Pennsylvania State University Press, 1993), pp. 45-96.
  • Martin, Hans-Peter and Harald Schumann, The Global Trap: Globalization and the Assault on Democracy and Prosperity (London: Zed Books, 1998), Chapter 8.
  • Lechner, Frank J. and John Boli (eds.), The Globalization Reader  (Malden; MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2000), pp. 195-239.

 

Week Twelve:  What Future Lies Ahead: “Good Governance” and the Resurgence of the Modernization Paradigm 

  • Desai and Potter, Chapter: 10.4
  • Kothari and Minogue, chapter 7 (“Power to the People? Good Governance and the Reshaping of the State”).
  • World Bank, World Development Report 2005 (NY: Oxford University Press, 2004), chapter 2, pp: 36-55. (available online)

http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTWDR2005/Resources/complete_report.pdf

 

Strongly Recommended:

  • Fukuyama, Frances, “The End of History”, The National Interest 16, Summer 1989, pp. 3-18.
  • Zanotti, Laura, “Governmentalizing the Post-Cold War International Regime: The UN debate on democratization and good governance”, in Alternatives: 30(4): October 2005: 461-87.

 

Recommended:

  • Kaplan, Robert, “The Coming Anarchy”, Atlantic Monthly 273(2), February 1994, pp. 44-75.
  • Storm, Servaas and J. Mohan Rao, “Market-Led Globalization and World Democracy can the twin ever meet”, Development and Change 35(3), June 2004, pp. 567-81.
  • Huntington, Samuel, “The Clash of Civilizations?” Lechner and Boli (eds.), The Globalization Reader, pp. 27-33.
  • Barber, Benjamin, “Jihad vs. McWorld”, Lechner and Boli (eds.), The Globalization Reader, pp. 21-26.
  • Diamond, Larry, “The Globalization of Democracy”, in Lechner and Boli (eds.), The Globalization Reader, pp. 246-54.
  • Potter, David, “Democratization, Good Governance and Development”, in Tim Allen and Alan Thomas (eds.), Poverty and Development into the 21st Century (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000), pp. 365-82.
  • Martin, Hans-Peter and Harald Schumann, The Global Trap: Globalization and the Assault on Democracy and Prosperity (London: Zed Books, 1998), Chapter 6
  • World Bank, Governance: the World Bank’s experience (Washungton, DC: World Bank, 1994).
  • Islam, Nasir and David R. Morrison, “Introduction: governance, democracy and human Rights”, Canadian Journal of Development Studies 1996, Special Issue, pp. 5-18.
  • Hammond, Allen, Which World: Scenarios for the 21st Century (Washington DC: Island Press, 1998), pp. 26-61.
  • J ‘Bayo Adekanye, “Structural Adjustment, Democratization and Rising Ethnic Tensions in Africa”, Development and Change 26(2), April 1995, pp. 355-74. 

 

*Please note that articles/book chapters with an asterisk mark are included in the Course Kit.

  

 

Development-Related Some Major Journals

 

Africa

African Affairs

Africa Today

Africa Recovery

Alternatives

American Journal of Economics and Sociology

Asian Development Review

Asian Survey

Bangladesh Development Studies

Canadian Foreign Policy

Canadian Journal of Development Studies

Comparative Politics

Competition and Change: The Journal of Global Business and Political Economy)

Conflict, Security and Development

Contemporary History

Current HistoryDaedalus

Development (Journal of the Society for International Development)

Development and Change

Development Dialogue

Development Digest

Development Forum

Development in Practice

Development Policy Review

Economic Development and Cultural Change

Economic Development Quarterly

Economic and Political Weekly

Environment and Planning

Environment and Urbanization

Feminist Review

Feminist Studies

Finance and Development

Foreign Affairs

Foreign Policy

Gender, Place and Culture

Gender and Society

Global Governance

IDS Bulletin

Information Technologies and International Development

International Feminist Journal of Politics

International Organization

Journal of Democracy

Journal of Developing Areas

Journal of Development Economics

Journal of Development Studies

Journal of International Development

Journal of Modern African Studies

Journal of Peasant Studies

Middle East Journal

Monthly Review

New Left Review

New Political Economy

Population and Development

Progress in Development Studies

Public Administration and Development

Review of African Political EconomyReview of International Political Economy

Social Movement Studies

Studies in Comparative International Development

Third World Quarterly

Women and International Development Annual

World Bank Economic Review

World Development

World Policy Journal