York University

Social Science 3801 6.0A

Understanding Development Planning and Management

 

 

Winter 2005 Class Room: FC 109

Instructor: Dr. Fahimul Quadir Thursdays 11:30-2:30

Tel: 66937

E-mail: fquadir@yorku.ca

Office: 319 Founders College

Office Hours: Thursdays: 10:00 to 11:30 and by appointment

The focus of the winter term will be shifted away from the discussion of planning theories/approaches/techniques to the analysis of development management and evaluation. Our plan is to divide the class into two major sections. While section one will deal with the challenges of development management in the new millennium, the last section is designed to make class-members familiar with the practice of development evaluation. In both sections, the course will aim at bridging the gap between development theory and praxis. Also, it will continue to explore the nature of the triangular relationship between academic research, development policy, and development practice. In particular, the course will examine the ways in which development scholars, policy makers, and practitioners can work together to improve the performance of development co-operation and/or intervention in the twenty-first century.

STRUCTURE OF THE CLASS

We plan to continue to organize the class around a three-hour weekly session consisting of primarily lectures and presentations by class-members. Based on the practice of last term, in the first half the class will meet for lectures on the topic at hand that will serve as the basis for understanding various issues central to development planning, management, and evaluation. The second half will be devoted to mainly student-led presentations, where the class-members will have the opportunity to present group projects on published reports that deal with the challenge of development management/evaluation.

Like the fall term, the course director would like to use the last few minutes to summarize the topic of the day. In both sessions, the class-members will be able to respond to a broad range of relevant issues on development planning, management and evaluation.

 

 

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Please refer to the previous course outline (fall 2004) for a detailed discussion of grading, assignments, and course requirements.

 

Group Presentation:

Each of the class-members will be required to make another presentation to the class during the next 12 weeks. Instead of dealing with a country plan, this time you will be concentrating on a specific development strategy, policy/project/project sponsored and/or introduced by either the World Bank or the UNDP within a particular country. You can pick up a project of your choice by simply visiting the following two web sites (These two sources will allow you to become familiar with various development activities undertaken by the World Bank and the UNDP in different parts of the world):

 

http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/COUNTRIES/0,,pagePK:180619~theSitePK:136917,00.html

http://www.undp.org/regions/countries/

I would strongly encourage you to do some research on your chosen country before selecting the topic of your presentation. If necessary, please consult me before making your mind up.

When presenting, I would expect you to do the following:

  1. Provide a broad overview of the project/program/strategy/policy. Discuss the major objectives of it.
  2. Review it within the wider context of development of the country concerned. In order to do so, you will have to make an effort to become familiar with the state of development of your selected country.
  3. Discuss how the chosen project/policy/strategy creates an opportunity for such different actors as the state, civil society and the market to work together to achieve the goals of it.
  4. Critically examine the ability of the project/program to address the fundamental development concerns of your chosen country.
  5. How is it financed?
  6. What is missing?

 

Be sure to follow the guidelines noted below:

The presenter (s) will be encouraged to use overheads, videos, and other audio-visual aids simply to make the presentation both stimulating and interesting. The presenter (s) will also be required to submit a 2-page written summary (double-spaced) of the presentation topic in advance. Your summary will include, among other things, a brief review of the chosen project/program, an assessment of it, and a bibliography of the works consulted.

In order to facilitate debates and/or discussions, the written summary must be submitted to the instructor via the Internet at least two days prior to the class at which it will be presented.

The presentation schedule will be finalized by the second week of this term.

Design a plan/strategy:

Using both the readings and discussions of this course, each of you will be designing a development plan/strategy for a community/country that interests you most. Your plan/strategy can focus on an issue either at the national or local level. The following is a list of some development issues that you may want to consider for your plan/strategy:

  1. Poverty reduction;
  2. Universal primary education,
  3. Local governance/capacity building at the local level for both the state and civil society;
  4. Preventing HIV/AIDS;
  5. Health and population;
  6. Air pollution;
  7. Empowerment of women/Gender mainstreaming;
  8. Urban poverty reduction

Once you have chosen your issue, your main goal would be to identify the key challenges facing the country/community today. As a planner, your task would be to use your talent, and creative imagination to craft a plan/strategy that can be effectively implemented to address those problems/challenges. You will also have to think about the ways in which the plan would be financially supported. Besides, you will be making an effort to identify the actors that are going to be involved in the entire process of designing, implementing and monitoring your plan/strategy.

Grades will be based on the quality of your research, the effectiveness of your plan/strategy, the use of source materials, and the organization of your essay. The essay should be no more than 12 pages in length, including the bibliography (double-spaced; the font size must be 12 points) which will be due on or before March 10, 2005. Late essays will be marked down 5% per day.

 

Examination:

There will be an in-class final examination which will be held on March 31, 2005.

 

REQUIRED TEXT

The class will use a new Course Kit which would include all the assigned readings for the winter term. You can access the Kit through Scott’s reserve section.

 

OTHER READINGS

The following list is expected to help class-members gain a better understanding of development planning and management. I would strongly encourage you to consult the following books on a regular basis:

Alexander, Ernest R., Approaches to Planning: introducing current planning theories, concepts and issues (New York: Gordon and Breach, 1986);

Beaudoux, E et al., Supporting Development Action (London: Macmillan, 1992);

Brinkerhoff, Derick W. and Benjamin L. Crosby, Managing Policy Reforms: concepts and tools for decision-makers in developing and transitioning countries (Bloomfield, CT: Kumarian, 2002);

Caiden, Naomi and Aron Wildavosky, Planning and Budgeting in Poor Countries (London: Transaction Publishers, 1990);

Chambers, Robert, Whose Really Counts? Putting the first last (London: ITDG Publishing);

Conyers, Daina and Peter Hills, An Introduction to Development Planning in the Third World (New York: John Wiley, 1984);

Cornwall, Andrea and Garett Pratt (eds.), Pathways to Participation: reflections on PRA (London: ITDG, 2003);

Dalal-Clayton, Barry et al., Rural Planning in Developing Countries: supporting natural resource management and sustainable livelihoods (London: Earthscan, 2003);

Eade, Deborah, Development Methods and Approaches: critical reflections (London: Oxfam, 2003);

-------, Capacity-Building: an approach to people-centered development (London: Oxfam, 1997);

Earl, Sarah et al, Outcome Mapping: building learning and reflection into development programs (Ottawa: IDRC, 2001);

Edwards, Michael, Future Positive: international co-operation in the 21st century (London: Earthscan, 2000)

Flaudi, Andreas, A Reader in Planning Theory (Oxford, Pergamon Press, 1973);

Friedmann, John, Planning in the Public Domain: from knowledge to action (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987);

Honadle, George, How Context Matters: linking environmental policy to people and place (West Hartford: CT: Kumarian, 1999);

Horton, Douglas et al, Evaluating Capacity Development: experiences from research and development organizations around the world (Ottawa: IDRC, 2003);

Kaufman, Michael and Haroldo Dilla Alfonso (eds.), Community Power and Grassroots Democracy: the transformation of social life (London: Zed books, 1997);

Kenny, Michael and James Meadowcroft (eds.), Planning Sustainability (London: Routledge, 1999);

Krishna, Anirudh et al., (eds.), Reasons for Hope: instructive experiences in rural development (West Hartford, CT: Kumarian, 1997);

Lewis, David and Tina Wallace (eds.), New Roles and Relevance: development NGOs and the challenge of change (Bloomfield, CT: Kumarian, 2000);

Macdonald, Mandy, Gender Planning in Development Agencies: meeting the challenge (London: Oxfam, 1994);

Marsden, David and Peter Oakley (eds.), Evaluating Social Development Projects (London: Oxfam, 1990);

Oakley, Peter et al. (eds.), Projects with People: the practice of participation in rural development (Geneva: International Labour Office, 1991);

Pye-Smith, Charle et al., The Wealth of Communities (West Hartford, CT: Kumarian, 1994).

Robinson, David et al., (eds.), Managing Development: understanding inter-organizational relationships (London: Sage Publications, 2000);

Saeed, Khalid, Development Planning and Policy Design (Aldershot, England: Avebury, 1994);

Scott, William and Stephen Gough (eds.), Key Issues in Sustainable Development and Learning: a critical review (London: RoutledgeFalmer, 2004);

Slocum, Rachel et al. (eds.), Power, Process and Participation: tools for change (London: ITDG, 1995);

Smillie, Ian and John Hailey, Managing for Change: leadership, strategy and management in Asian NGOs (London: Earthscan, 2001);

Ukaga, Okechukwu and Chris Maser, Evaluating Sustainable Development: giving people a voice in their destiny (Virginia: Stylus, 2004);

Veltmeyer, Henry and Anthony O’ Malley (eds.), Transcending Neoliberalism: community-based development in Latin America (Bloomfield, Kumarian, 2001);

Waterston, Albert, Development Planning: lessons of experience (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1979);

World Bank, Reaching the Rural Poor: a renewed strategy for rural development (Washington, D.C. 2003).

Section One: Planning and Managing Development

Week One

Development Management: the changing boundaries between the state, market and civil society

Recommended:

  • Smillie, Ian and John Hailey, Managing for Change: leadership, strategy & management in Asian NGOs (London: Earthscan, 2001): 1-16.
  • Lewis, David and Tina Wallace (eds.), New Roles and Relevance: development NGOs and the challenge of change (Bloomfield, CT: Kumarian, 2000): 1-14.

 

Week Two

Community-Based Development Management

  • Lynch, Owen and Kirk Talbott, Balancing Acts: community-based Forest management and national law in Asia and the Pacific (Bangkok: World Resources Institute, 1995): 9-29.*
  • Li, Tania Murray, "Engaging Simplifications: community-based resource management, market processes and state agendas in upland Southeast Asia", in World Development 30(2), 2002: 265-283. http://scholarsportal.info/pdflinks/04111314555118120.pdf

Recommended:

  • Metcalfe, Simon, "The CAMPFIRE Program: community-based wildlife resource management in Zimbabwe", in Krishna, Anirudh et al., (eds.), Reasons for Hope: instructive experiences in rural development (West Hartford, CT: Kumarian, 1997): 273-288.
  • Oakley, Peter et al. (eds.), Projects with People: the practice of participation in rural development (Geneva: International Labour Office, 1991): 145-158.

 

 

Week Three

Capacity Building

  • Horton, Douglas et al., Evaluating Capacity Development: experiences from research and development from the world (Ottawa: IDRC, 2003), Chapter 2 (The Basics of Capacity, Organizational Capacity Development, and Evaluation): 37-48. http://web.idrc.ca/en/ev-43616-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html
  • Kaplan, Allan, "Capacity Building: shifting the paradigms of practice", in Eade, Deborah, Development Methods and Approaches: critical reflections (London: Oxfam, 2003): 60-72.*

Recommended:

  • Eade, Deborah, Capacity-Building: an approach to people-centered development (London: Oxfam, 1997).
  • Postma, William, Capacity Building: the making of a curry", in Eade, Deborah, Development Methods and Approaches: critical reflections (London: Oxfam, 2003): 73-85.

Week Four

Rural Development

  • Abed, F.H. and A.M.R. Chowdhury, "The Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee: how BRAC learned to meet rural people’s need through local action", in Krishna, Anirudh et al., (eds.), Reasons for Hope: instructive experiences in rural development (West Hartford, CT: Kumarian, 1997): 41-56.*

Recommended:

  • Chambers, Robert, Whose Really Counts? Putting the first last (London: ITDG Publishing): 15-33.
  • Dalal-Clayton, Barry et al., Rural Planning in Developing Countries: supporting natural resource management and sustainable livelihoods (London: Earthscan, 2003): 185-200.

Week Five

Gender (Planning) Mainstreaming

  • Moser, Caroline, "Gender Planning in the Third World: meeting practical and strategic gender needs", World Development 17(11), 1989: 1799-1825. http://scholarsportal.info/pdflinks/04111312563728402.pdf
  • Macdonald, Mandy (ed.), Gender Planning in Development Agencies: meeting the challenge (London: Oxfam, 1994): 15-22.*
  • Howard, Patricia, "Beyond the ‘grim resisters’: towards more effective gender mainstreaming through stakeholder participation", in Eade, Deborah, Development Methods and Approaches: critical reflections (London: Oxfam, 2003): 124-142.*

 

Recommended:

  • Ashworth, Georgina, "An ABC of Institutionalizing Gender", in Macdonald, Mandy (ed.), Gender Planning in Development Agencies: meeting the challenge (London: Oxfam, 1994): 65-79.
  • Kabeer, Naila, "Gender-Aware Policy and Planning: a social relations perspective", in Macdonald, Mandy (ed.), Gender Planning in Development Agencies: meeting the challenge (London: Oxfam, 1994): 80-97.

Week Six

Gender Management System

Recommended:

  • Gwaba, Regis M., "Reflecting on PRA, Participation and Gender", in Cornwall, Andrea and Garett Pratt (eds.), Pathways to Participation: reflections on PRA (London: ITDG, 2003): 88-93.

Week Seven

Reading Week

 

Week Eight

Planning and Managing Sustainability

  • Honadle, George, How Context Matters: linking environmental policy to people and place (West Hartford: CT: Kumarian, 1999): 11-26. *

Recommended:

  • Meadowcroft, James, "Planning for Sustainable Development: insights from the literature of Political Science", European Journal of Political Research 31(1997): 427-454. http://scholarsportal.info/pdflinks/04111312423726726.pdf
  • Naess, Peter, "Urban Planning and Sustainable Development", European Planning Studies 9(4), 2001: 503-524. http://www.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=article&issn=0965-4313&volume=9&issue=4&spage=503
  • Scott, William and Stephen Gough (eds.), Key Issues in Sustainable Development and Learning: a critical review (London: RoutledgeFalmer, 2004): 22-41.
  • Selman, Paul, "Three Decades of Environmental Planning: what have we really learned?, in Kenny, Michael and James Meadowcroft (eds.), Planning Sustainability (London: Routledge, 1999):148-174.

 

Section Two: Evaluating Development Intervention

Week Nine

The Meaning of Evaluation

  • Horton, Douglas et al., Evaluating Capacity Development: experiences from research and development from the world (Ottawa: IDRC, 2003), Chapter 7 (Using and Benefiting from an Evaluation): 107-120 http://web.idrc.ca/en/ev-43627-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html
  • Mayer, Marion and Naresh Singh, "Two Approaches to Evaluating the Outcomes of Development Projects", in Eade, Deborah, Development Methods and Approaches: critical reflections (London: Oxfam, 2003): 240-248.*

Recommended:

  • Marsden, David and Peter Oakley, "The Meaning and Evaluation of Social Development" in Marsden, David and Peter Oakley (eds.), Evaluating Social Development Projects (London: Oxfam, 1990): 16-39.
  • Earl, Sarah et al., Outcome Mapping: building learning and reflection into development programs (Ottawa: IDRC, 2001): 1-30. http://web.idrc.ca/en/ev-9330-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html

 

Week Ten

Planning an Evaluation

  • Ukaga, Okechukwu and Chris Maser, Evaluating Sustainable Development: giving people a voice in their destiny (Virginia: Stylus, 2004): 7-22.*

 

Recommended:

  • Rahman, Muhammad Anisur, ""Qualitative Dimensions of Social Development Evaltuation", in Marsden, David and Peter Oakley (eds.), Evaluating Social Development Projects (London: Oxfam, 1990):40-50.

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT IS DUE.

 

 

Week Eleven

Organizational Assessment

Recommended:

  • Smillie, Ian and John Hailey, Managing for Change: leadership, strategy & management in Asian NGOs (London: Earthscan, 2001): 17-48.
  • Picciotto, R. and E. Weisner (eds.), Evaluation and Development: the institutional dimension (Washington D.C: World Bank, 1998).

Week Twelve

Review of the course

While there is no assigned reading for this week, you are encouraged to look thorough the following few chapters:

  • Derman, William and Scott Whiteford (eds.), Social Impact Analysis and Development Planning in the Third World (Boulder, CO: Westview, 1985): 1-18. Bigman, David (ed.), Globalization and the Developing Countries: emerging strategies for rural development and poverty alleviation (New York: CABI Publishing, 2002), part 2.
  • Kaplan, Allan, "Understanding Development as a Living Process:, in Lewis, David and Tina Wallace (eds.), New Roles and Relevance: development NGOs and the challenge of change (Bloomfield, CT: Kumarian, 2000): 29-38;
  • Edwards, Michael and David Hulme (eds.), Beyond the Magic Bullet: NGO performance and accountability in the post-Cold-War world (West Hartford, CT: Kumarian, 1996): 1-20;
  • Finsterbusch, Kurt, "Estimating Policy Consequences for Individuals, Organizations, and Communities", in Finsterbusch, Kurt and C. P. Wolf (eds.), Methodology of Social Impact Assessment (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1975): 13-20.

Week Thirteen

Final exam

 

*Please note that articles/book chapters with an asterisk mark are included in the Course Kit.

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