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Graduate Program in Communication & Culture

Faculty Profiles

Evan Cameron

Politics and Policy

University   York University
E-Mail Address   ewc@yorku.ca
Phone Number   (416) 736-5149, ext. 88686
Office Location   CFT 216
Office Hours   TBA


Education

A.B. (Knox College); M.S. (Boston); Ph.D. Philosophy (Boston)

Biography

Professor Cameron has taught screenwriting, design and production in Canada, England and the United States, and was for ten years head of a prize-winning educational, documentary and anthropological film company. Two of his students have won Academy Awards, two others Academy Award nominations and three others Student Academy Awards. He was invited to deliver the 2002 Leonard Lecture at the University of Nevada (Reno), Department of Philosophy, speaking upon the topic "Wittgenstein, Gödel and Collingwood: How We Learn (and Learn to Write Screenplays)."

Research Interests

With appointments to the graduate programmes in Cultural Studies, Film & Video and Philosophy, Professor Cameron has published widely in both film and philosophy, pondering especially the historical and philosophical roots of screenwriting and classical film theory. His interests focus upon the intersection of filmmaking and philosophy, pondering from an advanced historical and philosophical point of view how, when and why our working conceptions of screenwriting have evolved as they have, incorporating an increasingly severe critique of a family of common presumptions concerning the logic of identifying, negating and quantifying.

Selected Publications

"Filmmaking, Logic and the Historical Reconstruction of the World". Film & Philosophy II, 1995. pp. 88-104.

"Spengler's List: Screenwriting, the Wilderness and the Civilizing Death of the Arts", Journal of Arts Management, Law and Society, 24, Number 2 (Summer 1994). 174-184.

"Kant's Station; the Lumières' Train: Seeing Things by Means of Film". Canadian Journal of Film Studies, 1, Number 1 (1990). 36-56.

 

 

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Harold [Innis] taught us how to use the bias of culture and communication as an instrument of research. By directing attention to the bias, or distorting power of the dominant imagery and technology of any culture, he showed us how to understand cultures.
~ Marshall McLuhan