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Graduate Program in Communication & Culture

Faculty Profiles

John Caruana

Media and Culture

University   Ryerson University
E-Mail Address   jcaruana@ryerson.ca
Phone Number   416-979-5000; ext 7414
Office Location   JOR-620
Office Hours   TBA


Education

B.A. (McGill); M.A. (York); Ph.D. Social and Political Thought (York)

Biography

John Caruana joined Ryerson's Department of Philosophy in 2003. Previously, he had taught courses in philosophy at both Ryerson and York University. In addition to contemporary European philosophy, he is also interested in the study of film, in particular, the philosophical and religious undercurrents of cinema. He is presently doing research on the cinema of Abbas Kiarostami and Krzysztof Kieslowski.

http://www.ryerson.ca/~jcaruana

Research Interests

Philosophy and film, post-structuralism, Frankfurt School, contemporary European thought, psychoanalysis, religion and culture.

Selected Publications

"The Drama of Being: Levinas and the History of Philosophy," Continental Philosophy Review (forthcoming 2006).

"'Not Ethics, Not Ethics Alone, but the Holy': Levinas on Ethics and Holiness," Journal of Religious Ethics (forthcoming 2006).

"Levinas," in Essentials of Philosophy and Ethics, ed. M. Cohen (London: Hodder & Stoughton (forthcoming 2006).

"Levinas's Critique of the Sacred," International Philosophical Quarterly 42: 4 (2002), 519-534.

"The Catastrophic 'Site and Non-Site' of Proximity: Redeeming the Disaster of Being," International Studies in Philosophy 30:1 (1998), 33-46.
"Mourning and Mimesis: The Freudian Ethics of Theodor Adorno," Canadian Journal of Psychoanalysis 3:2 (1996), 89-108

 

 

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Harold [Innis] taught us how to use the bias of culture and communication as an instrument of research. By directing attention to the bias, or distorting power of the dominant imagery and technology of any culture, he showed us how to understand cultures.
~ Marshall McLuhan