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Graduate Program in Communication & Culture

Faculty Profiles

Darcey Callison

Media and Culture

University York University
E-Mail

callison@yorku.ca

Phone Number

(416) 736-2100 ext. 22463

Office Location

317 Accolade Building East

Office Hours Upon Request

 

Education

BFA (Victoria), MA (Simon Fraser), PhD (York)

Biography

Darcey Callison is a choreographer, dance scholar and cultural theorist whose performance study includes extensive research into with Authentic Movement, the physical voice, Viewpoints and post-modern theatrical dance. His creative studio-based research integrates new media and cultural studies with postmodern dance methodologies. He is also a physical trainer whose Personal Body Work workshops focus on diverse improvisational techniques and the somatic investigations for personal creativity and the development of authentic physical expressions.

Professor Callison currently serves as director of the MFA Graduate Program in Dance at York University.

Research Interests

Choreography, Dance Dramaturgy, Popular Culture and Dance, Performance Studies and Gender (masculinity)

Selected Publications:

"Being Rita Hayworth", Review for Pacific Historical Review, Portland Oregon (2005).


"Men and Dance" in the Encyclopedia of Masculinity, Routeldge (2005).


"Dancing the Voice and Voicing Dance Part II", in Dance Current, March (2004).


"Dancing the Voice and Voicing Dance Part I", in Dance Current, February (2004).


"Western Theatrical Male Dancers", Encyclopedia of Masculinity, editor Michael Kimmel (2004).

" Hollywood Male Dancers", Encyclopedia of Masculinity, editor Michael Kimmel (2004.


"Astaire's Feet and Travolta's Pelvis: Maintaining the Boy Code" - *torquere* the Journal of Canadian Lesbian and Gay Studies (2002).


"The Optimistic Rise of Gene Kelly and Marlon Brando’s Honest Fall: American Men Living and Dancing in Paris", Society of Dance History Scholars, Philadelphia (2002).

By Field of Study


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Harold [Innis] taught us how to use the bias of culture and communication as an instrument of research. By directing attention to the bias, or distorting power of the dominant imagery and technology of any culture, he showed us how to understand cultures.
~ Marshall McLuhan