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Graduate Program in Communication & Culture

Faculty Profiles

Jennifer Fisher

Media and Culture

University   York University
E-Mail Address   jefish@yorku.ca
Phone Number   416-736-2100; ext 33410
Office Location   CFA 252
Office Hours   TBA


Education

B.F.A. (NSCAD); M.A. (University of Montreal); Ph.D. (Concordia)


Biography

Professor Fisher's research engages cultural studies approaches to examine contemporary art, curatorial practice, display culture and the aesthetics of the non-visual senses. She is a founding member of the curatorial collaborative DisplayCult which produced the exhibitions Odor Limits (2008), Do Me! (2006), Linda Montano: 14 Years of Living Art (2003), Museopathy (2001), Vital Signs (2000), and CounterPoses (1998), among other projects. She co-directed UnCommon Senses: The Senses in Art and Culture (2000), an interdisciplinary conference at Concordia University, and recently edited an anthology on the sixth sense.


Research Interests

 

Selected Publications

“Tangible Acts,” The Senses in Performance, eds. Sally Banes and Andre Lepinki, New York & London: Routledge, 2007.

“Exhibitionary Affect,” n.paradoxa, special issue “Curatorial Strategies,” 18 (2006): 27-33.

“In Noritoshi Hirakawa’s ‘Garden of Nirvana,’” The Smell Culture Reader, ed. Jim Drobnick (Oxford & New York: Berg, 2006), 320-327 (co-author).
"Oral Logics of the Museum," Public #30, "Eating Things," ed. Scott McFarlane, Winter 2005.
"Out and About: The Performances of Shawna Dempsey and Lorri Millan," Caught in the Act, eds. Johanna Householder and Tanya Mars, Toronto: YYZ Books, 2005.
"Ambient Communities and Association Complexes; Aernout Mik's Awry Socialities," in Aernout Mik, ed. Stephanie Rosenthal, Munich: Haus der Kunst (co-author), 2004.
"Tactile Affects," Tessera, 2003.
Museopathy, exhibition catalogue, Kingston: The Agnes Etherington Art Centre in association with DisplayCult (co-author), 2002.
Edited Books
Technologies of Intuition, editor, Toronto: YYZBOOKS & Winnipeg: MAWA, 2006.

 

 

By Field of Study


Alphabetical

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Harold [Innis] taught us how to use the bias of culture and communication as an instrument of research. By directing attention to the bias, or distorting power of the dominant imagery and technology of any culture, he showed us how to understand cultures.
~ Marshall McLuhan