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Graduate Program in Communication & Culture

Faculty Profiles

Irene Gammel

Media & Culture

Area of Concentration: Media & Culture
University: Ryerson University
E-Mail Address: gammel@ryerson.ca
Website: www.ryerson.ca/mlc

 

Education

Ph.D. English (McMaster University); M.A. English (McMaster University); Staatsexamen (MA Equivalent), English, French (Universität des Saarlandes, Germany).

Biography

Irene Gammel is Professor of English and holds the Canada Research Chair in Modern Literature and Culture and at Ryerson University, Toronto, where she also directs the Modern Literature and Culture Research Centre. Irene Gammel is well-known for her scholarship and teaching on gender, modernism, visual culture, and the avant-garde. Her research has helped uncover the earliest roots of modern and feminist performance art, contributed to the consolidation of L.M. Montgomery Studies as an academic field, and claimed women’s confessional discourses as a sub-discipline of autobiographical studies.

“Modern Literary Circles: A Cultural Approach,” the graduate course Irene Gammel is contributing to the Communication and Culture programme, studies the culture of the early twentieth-century modernist salons in several world cities including New York, Paris, and London with a focus on New York Dada, the Left Bank Moderns, and Bloomsbury. The course explores a range of cultural expressions including print culture, visual culture and performance.

Irene Gammel has served as president of the Canadian Comparative Literature Association, editorial board member of Canadian Literature, co-chair of the L. M. Montgomery Institute, vice-president of the Canadian Comparative Literature Association, and director of Women’s Studies at UPEI. She has held visiting professorships at the Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena and Erfurt Universität in Germany (Spring 2001). For more detail, see Irene Gammel’s webpage: www.ryerson.ca/mlc

Research Interest

Modernism; the avant-garde; World War I literature and culture; trauma; visual culture; performance studies; life writing; everyday modernity; popular magazines; Fashion; digital culture; affect; gender; editing. 

Selected Publications

Ed. (with Suzanne Zelazo). Body Sweats: The Uncensored Writings of Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2011.
Ed. (with Suzanne Zelazo). Crystal Flowers: Poetry and a Libretto by Florine Stettheimer. Toronto: BookThug, 2010.
Ed. (with Benjamin Lefebvre). Anne’s World: A New Century of Anne of Green Gables. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2010.

Looking for Anne of Green Gables: The Story of Lucy Maud Montgomery and her Literary Classic. Toronto: Key Porter Books; New York: St. Martin’s Books, 2008.

Looking for Anne of Green Gables: The Story of Lucy Maud Montgomery and her Literary Classic. Toronto: Key Porter Books; New York: St. Martin’s Books, 2008.

Ed., trans. Mein Mund ist lüstern / I Got Lusting Palate: Dada Verse von Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. Berlin: Ebersbach, 2005.
Ed. The Intimate Life of L.M.Montgomery. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2005.
Die Dada Baroness: Das wilde Leben der Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. Berlin: Ebersbach, 2003.
Baroness Elsa: Gender, Dada, and Everyday Modernity. A Cultural Biography. Cambridge and London: MIT Press, 2002.
Ed. Making Avonlea: L.M. Montgomery and Popular Culture. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2002.
Ed. Confessional Politics: Women’s Sexual Self-Representations in Life Writing and Popular Media. Southern Illinois University Press, 1999.
Ed. (with Elizabeth Epperly) L. M. Montgomery and Canadian Culture. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1999.
Sexualizing Power in Naturalism: Theodore Dreiser and Frederick Philip Grove. Calgary: University of Calgary Press, 1994.
Link to Personal Website: www.ryerson.ca/mlc

 

 

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Harold [Innis] taught us how to use the bias of culture and communication as an instrument of research. By directing attention to the bias, or distorting power of the dominant imagery and technology of any culture, he showed us how to understand cultures.
~ Marshall McLuhan