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Graduate Program in Communication & Culture

Faculty Profiles

Jan Hadlaw

Technology in Practice/ Media & Culture

University   York University
E-Mail Address   jhadlaw@yorku.ca
Phone Number   416-736-2100; ext 22600
Office Location   TEL Building, 4008
Office Hours   TBA


Education

B.F.A. Visual Arts (Concordia); M.A. Media Studies (Concordia); Ph.D. Communications (SFU)

Biography

Professor Hadlaw is an Associate Professor of Design Studies at York University. Her work focuses on the history of ubiquitous technologies, in particular the modern telephone and more recently, the mobile telephone, and the ways in which their design and representation have acted to influence the conceptions and ideals of everyday life. Her current research explores design’s role in the performance of Canadian national identity in the 1960s and 70s.

Research Interests

Communication and media history, cultural history of telephony, the design and representation of technology, technologies and the social imaginaries of time and space, media and everyday life, advertising and consumer society, modern design and Canadian nationalism

Selected Publications

 “Technological Pragmatism, Modern Design, and Canadian National Identity: A Case Study of the Contempra Telephone,” Journal of Design History (forthcoming 2012).


 “Saving Time and Annihilating Space: Discourses of Speed in AT&T Advertising, 1909–1929.” Space and Culture 14, no. 2 (2011): 85-113.

 “The Design Competition: The Function, Form, and Meaning of the Bell Telephone, 1920–1939,” in B. Darras and S. Belkhamsa (eds.) Object et Communication. MEI (Mediation et Information) no. 30-31 (2009): 329-340. 

“The London Underground Map: Imagining Modern Time and Space,” Design Issues 19, no. 1 (2003): 28-35. 

Plus ça Change: The Telephone and the History of the Future,” M/C: A Journal of Media and Culture 3, no. 6 (2000)

<http://www.api-network.com/mc/0012/plus.php>.

 

 

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Harold [Innis] taught us how to use the bias of culture and communication as an instrument of research. By directing attention to the bias, or distorting power of the dominant imagery and technology of any culture, he showed us how to understand cultures.
~ Marshall McLuhan