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Graduate Program in Communication & Culture

Faculty Profiles

Markus Reisenleitner

Media & Culture

University York University
E-Mail

mrln@yorku.ca

Phone Number (416) 736-2100 ext. 55613
Office Location Vanier College, 217
Office Hours TBA

Education

MA, PhD University of Vienna

Biography

Before joining York's Division of Humanities in 2006, Markus Reisenleitner taught at the University of Vienna, the Vienna campus of the University of Oregon's International Program, the University of Alberta, and Lingnan University in Hong Kong, where he was Head of the Department of Cultural Studies from 2004-2006.

Research Interests

Visual and textual interpretations of global cities; European urban culture; history, memory and nostalgia in popular and digital culture.

Selected Publications

Morris, M., M. Reisenleitner and C. Turner (eds.). (2008). Urban Imaginaries. Spec. Issue of Inter-Asia Cultural Studies 9(4): Routledge.

 Reisenleitner, M. (2007). There's No Place Like Charmed: Domesticity, the Uncanny, and the Utopian Potential of the City. Investigating Charmed: The Magic Power of TV. K. Beeler and S. Beeler. London; New York, L.B.Tauris: 143-165.  

Reisenleitner, M. (2007). Beyond Bildung: The "Disciplinarity and Dissent" of Cultural Studies in the Global Managerial Academy. Hyphenated histories: articulations of Central European Bildung and Slavic studies in the contemporary academy. A. C. Gow. Leiden; Boston, Brill: 19-41.

 Ingram, S. and M. Reisenleitner (2006). "Polarizing Avalon: The European Virtuosity and Global Virtuality of Mamoru Oshii's Filmic Imaginary." New Cinemas: Journal of Contemporary Film 4(2): 129-138. 

Lutter, Christina, and Markus Reisenleitner. Cultural Studies: eine Einführung [Cultural Studies: an Introduction]. 6 ed. Vienna: Turia + Kant, 2009 [1999]. (in German)

Link to personal website: http://www.yorku.ca/mrln

 

 

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Harold [Innis] taught us how to use the bias of culture and communication as an instrument of research. By directing attention to the bias, or distorting power of the dominant imagery and technology of any culture, he showed us how to understand cultures.
~ Marshall McLuhan