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Graduate Program in Communication & Culture

Faculty Profiles

Mona Oikawa

Politics & Policy/ Media & Culture

University   York University
E-Mail Address   oikawa@yorku.ca
Phone Number   (416) 736-2100, ext. 44014
Office Location   Atkinson College, 320
Office Hours   TBA


Education

B.A. (York); M.A.(Toronto); PhD (Toronto)

Biography

Professor Oikawa is Associate Professor of Social Science in the Atkinson School of Social Sciences. She is a faculty member in the BA program in Race, Ethnicity and Indigeneity. She teaches the undergraduate courses, Ethnic Communities in Canada and Theory in Colonialism, Race and Indigeneity. Her research interests include critical race studies, the Internment of Japanese Canadians, sexuality studies, and cultural studies. Mona is currently working on the research project, "Racial Formations in a Settler Society: Japanese Canadians' Relationship to Colonialism," funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. She is also a published poet.

Research Interests

Critical Race Studies, Cultural Studies.

Selected Publications

Cartographies of Violence: Women, Memory, and the Subject(s) of the "Internment." (Forthcoming, University of Toronto Press).
Resist!: Essays Against a Homophobic Culture. (Ed.) with Dionne Falconer and Ann Decter. Toronto: Women's Press, 1994.
Out Rage. (Ed.) with Dionne Falconer, Rosamund Elwin, and Ann Decter. Toronto: Women's Press, 1993.
All Names Spoken. (with Tamai Kobayashi). Toronto: Sister Vision Press, 1992.
"Dis-Orienting the Gaze: Re-viewing Images of Japanese Canadian Women in Internment Narratives." Canadian Journal of Communication. (In revision.)
"Connecting the Internment of Japanese Canadians to the Colonization of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada." Aboriginal Connections to Race, Environment and Traditions, edited by R. Riewe and J. Oakes, 17-26. Winnipeg: Aboriginal Issues Press, University of Manitoba, 2006.
"Cartographies of Violence: Women, Memory and the Subject(s) of the 'Internment.'" Canadian Journal of Law and Society 15, 2 (December 2000): 39-69.
Reprinted in Race, Space and the Law: Unmapping a White Settler Society, edited by Sherene H. Razack, 72-98, 268-272. Toronto: Between the Lines, 2002.
Current research projects/journals:
Racial Formations in a Settler Society: Japanese Canadians' Relationship to Colonialism (SSHRC funded); Unmapping the Hasting Park Incarceration Site.

 

 

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Harold [Innis] taught us how to use the bias of culture and communication as an instrument of research. By directing attention to the bias, or distorting power of the dominant imagery and technology of any culture, he showed us how to understand cultures.
~ Marshall McLuhan