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Graduate Program in Communication & Culture

Faculty Profiles

Murray Pomerance

Media & Culture

University   Ryerson University
E-Mail Address   mpomeran@ryerson.ca
Phone Number   (416) 979-5000, ext. 6154
Office Location   JOR-301
Office Hours   TBA


Education

M.A. (SUNY Buffalo)

Biography

Since 1973, Murray Pomerance has taught more than 50 courses at Ryerson University in such subjects as media and society, Hollywood and society, and popular culture at the undergraduate level. Within the Joint Programme in Communication & Culture, Professor Pomerance has created unique seminar classes that examine representation, structure, meaning, performance, and other aspects of film. For 10 years he was also cross-appointed to Film & Photography at Ryerson. He served as Chair of the Sociology Department between 1997 and 2006. In 1995, Murray Pomerance created the Media Studies Working Group with John Sakeris and he has co-chaired conferences on intellect and ideology in media culture, the representation of youth in film and television, and on media and guns. He is also a member of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies and of the Film Studies Association of Canada. His fiction has been published in The Paris Review, The Kenyon Review, New Directions, The Boston Review, Descant and other places. Murray Pomerance has been the recipient of an O. Henry Award and
appears in Best Canadian Stories 2004.

He is editor of the “Techniques of the Moving Image” series at Rutgers University Press and the "Horizons of Cinema" series at SUNY Press, and co-editor, with Lester D. Friedman and Adrienne L. McLean respectively, of the "Screen Decades" and “Star Decades” series at Rutgers University Press. He is a member of the editorial board of the "Contemporary Cinema" series at Editions Rodopi, Antwerp and the journal In Short.


Research Interests

Cinema Studies; Sociology of Narrative; Hitchcock, performance theory, celebrity.

Selected Publications

The Horse Who Drank the Sky: Film Experience Beyond Narrative and Theory. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2008.
A Family Affair: Cinema Calls Home. Edited by Murray Pomerance.London: Wallflower Press, 2008.
Popping Culture, 5th ed. Edited by Murray Pomerance and John Sakeris. Boston: Pearson Education, 2008.
City That Never Sleeps: New York and the Filmic Imagination. Edited by Murray Pomerance. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2007.
Cinema and Modernity. Edited by Murray Pomerance. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2006.
From Hobbits to Hollywood: Essays on Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings. Edited by Ernest Mathijs and Murray Pomerance. Amsterdam: Editions Rodopi, 2006.

American Cinema of the 1950s: Themes and Variations. Edited by Murray Pomerance. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press, forthcoming.

Johnny Depp Starts Here. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2005.
Savage Time. Ottawa: Oberon Press, 2005.
Where the Boys Are: Cinemas of Masculinity and Youth. Edited by Murray Pomerance and Frances Gateward. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2005.

An Eye for Hitchcock. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2004.

BAD: Infamy, Darkness, Evil, and Slime on Screen. Edited by Murray Pomerance. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2004

Enfant Terrible! Jerry Lewis in American Film. Edited by Murray Pomerance. New York: New York University Press, 2002

Sugar, Spice, and Everything Nice: Cinemas of Girlhood. Edited by Frances Gateward and Murray Pomerance. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2002.

Ladies and Gentlemen, Boys and Girls: Gender in Film at the End of the Twentieth Century. Edited by Murray Pomerance. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2001.

Magia D'Amore. By Murray Pomerance. Los Angeles: Sun & Moon Press, 1999.
Link to expanded profile page: www.ryerson.ca/mgroup/murray.html

 

 

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Harold [Innis] taught us how to use the bias of culture and communication as an instrument of research. By directing attention to the bias, or distorting power of the dominant imagery and technology of any culture, he showed us how to understand cultures.
~ Marshall McLuhan