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Graduate Program in Communication & Culture

Faculty Profiles

David Skinner

Politics & Policy

University   York University
E-Mail Address   skinnerd@yorku.ca
Phone Number   (416)736-2100 ext. 33853
Office Location   TEL Building, 3019
Office Hours   TBA

Education

B.A. (SFU); M.A. (Concordia); Ph.D. Communication (SFU)

Biography

Professor Skinner joined the Communication Studies Program in the Division of Social Science at York University in July 2002. Before coming to York he was the founding chair of the Bachelor of Journalism at Thompson Rivers University and taught undergraduate communication courses at five Canadian universities. David is currently researching and writing in the fields of independent media and media reform in Canada.

Research Interests

Political Economy of Communication, Media and Communications Policy,
Alternative and Community Media, Media Democracy

Selected Publications

Lorimer, Rowland, Mike Gasher, & David Skinner. (2007) Mass Communication in Canada, Sixth Edition. Oxford University Press.
Skinner, David. (2007) “Broadcasting in Canada.” In David Ward and Anthony McNicholas (Eds.). Television and Public Policy: Change and Continuity in an Era of Liberation. New Jersey: Lawrence Earlbaum Associates Inc.
Skinner, David, “Alternative Media In Canada.” (2005) In Paul Attallah and Leslie Regan Shade (Eds.). Mediascapes: New Patterns in Canadian Communciation, 2nd Ed. Toronto: Thomson Nelson. Pp. 213-229.
Skinner, David, James Compton, and Mike Gasher (Eds.), (2005) Converging Media, Diverging Interests: A Political Economy of News in the United States and Canada. Lexington Books.
Skinner, David, (2005), “Divided Loyalties: The Early Development of Canada’s ‘Single’ Broadcasting System.” Journal of Radio Studies. 12 (1) pp. 136-155.

 

 

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Harold [Innis] taught us how to use the bias of culture and communication as an instrument of research. By directing attention to the bias, or distorting power of the dominant imagery and technology of any culture, he showed us how to understand cultures.
~ Marshall McLuhan