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Graduate Program in History

Courses > General Information


| General Information | Course Descriptions |     2012-2013 Timetable    2013-2014 Tentative Timetable

5000-LEVEL SEMINARS:
(Combine reading, presentations and discussion and a research paper based on primary sources.)

The following courses are those which, from time to time, are offered by the Graduate program in History (GPH). However, the GPH is small and the resources are limited. The courses formally offered each year are, therefore, few in number. Moreover, with the commitment to research and the high rate of publication, members of the GPH are the recipients of an unusually large number of research grants, as well as the customary sabbatical leaves. The decisions about the course offerings and the faculty assigned to teach them, therefore, often cannot be finally made until the winter, or unfortunately even the spring. However, in addition to the formally mounted courses, the GPH attempts to provide students with Directed Reading Courses when other courses in their field of interest are not available.

Courses in history, as well as those which are taken in other disciplines, are selected in consultation with the director and supervisors so that the pattern of studies undertaken by the candidate is intellectually coherent and does justice to the close connections between fields of study.

See 5000-level course descriptions.

SPECIAL TOPICS:
In any given year, one or more courses may be offered on topics which combine the interest of a faculty member and students, and which is not included in the usual course offerings.

DIRECTED READING COURSES:
primarily for Ph.D. candidates preparing for qualifying examinations, and for M.A. candidates when the current field seminar does not satisfy the candidate's research interests. Reading courses will normally require written work.
History 5060.03/06, 5070.03/06, 5080.03/06, 5090.03/06: DIRECTED READINGS

RESEARCH DIRECTION:
History 5000.06: M.A. Major Research Paper History 5010.06: Ph.D. II Research Paper Depending on the research subject, reading knowledge of foreign language(s) may be required.

TRANSFER REGISTRATION:
Candidates at York University and the University of Toronto may, in any single academic year, register for one course in the university in which they are not a candidate for a degree, provided that (a) the director at the home university and the director and instructor at the other university approve, (b) the home university does not offer an equivalent course, and (c) a place is available in the course in the other university. Further details on this matter are provided at the time of registration.

LANGUAGE AND COGNATE REQUIREMENTS:
Candidates for the Ph.D. degree are asked to demonstrate an ability to read such foreign languages as are necessary to enable them to use the major primary and secondary sources in the field in which they are writing their dissertation. For Canadianists, a reading knowledge of French is required. Candidates may be asked to take an examination to indicate reading proficiency. (Putative dissertation supervisors, with the assistance of their colleagues, as required, will be asked to indicate that the candidate has the required language skills.) When appropriate, other skills (e.g., statistics, computer science, survey research) are required as an alternative to or in addition to language requirements. In addition, many courses have language requirements.

6000-LEVEL CONFERENCE COURSES:
(Primarily designed for the field examination.)
The following courses are those which, from time to time, are offered by the Graduate program in History (GPH). However, the GPH is small and the resources are limited. The courses formally offered each year are, therefore, few in number. Moreover, with the commitment to research and the high rate of publication, members of the GPH are the recipients of an unusually large number of research grants, as well as the customary sabbatical leaves. The decisions about the course offerings and the faculty assigned to teach them, therefore, often cannot be finally made until the winter, or unfortunately even the spring. However, in addition to the formally mounted courses, the GPH attempts to provide students with Directed Reading Courses when other courses in their field of interest are not available.

Courses in history, as well as those which are taken in other disciplines, are selected in consultation with the director and supervisors so that the pattern of studies undertaken by the candidate is intellectually coherent and does justice to the close connections between fields of study.

See 6000-level course descriptions.

SPECIAL TOPICS:
In any given year, one or more courses may be offered on topics which combine the interest of a faculty member and students, and which is not included in the usual course offerings.

DIRECTED READING COURSES:
primarily for Ph.D. candidates preparing for qualifying examinations, and for M.A. candidates when the current field seminar does not satisfy the candidate's research interests. Reading courses will normally require written work. History 6001.03/06, 6002.03/06, 6003.03/06: DIRECTED READINGS

RESEARCH DIRECTION:
Depending on the research subject, reading knowledge of foreign language(s) may be required. History 6000.00: M.A. Thesis Research History 7000.00: Ph.D. Dissertation Research

TRANSFER REGISTRATION: Candidates at York University and the University of Toronto may, in any single academic year, register for one course in the university in which they are not a candidate for a degree, provided that (a) the director at the home university and the director and instructor at the other university approve, (b) the home university does not offer an equivalent course, and (c) a place is available in the course in the other university. Further details on this matter are provided at the time of registration.

LANGUAGE AND COGNATE REQUIREMENTS:
Candidates for the Ph.D. degree are asked to demonstrate an ability to read such foreign languages as are necessary to enable them to use the major primary and secondary sources in the field in which they are writing their dissertation. For Canadianists, a reading knowledge of French is required. Candidates may be asked to take an examination to indicate reading proficiency. (Putative dissertation supervisors, with the assistance of their colleagues, as required, will be asked to indicate that the candidate has the required language skills.) When appropriate, other skills (e.g., statistics, computer science, survey research) are required as an alternative to or in addition to language requirements. In addition, many courses have language requirements.