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First Year Courses 2013-14

ANTH1120 6.0 Making Sense of a Changing World: Anthropology Today

Course Directors: Profs. David Murray, Tania Ahmad

Time: Monday 10:30-12:30 VC 135

OR

Wednesday 12:30-2:30 ACW 109

In this course you will use anthropological approaches to increase your understanding of global issues in diverse locales. This course challenges you to engage with other ways of knowing and being, and to rethink your taken-for-granted knowledge and beliefs through the comparative analysis of the human condition. This course will take a problem-based approach to a range of topics such as: the effects of race and racism, sources of religious conflict, alternate genders and sexualities, First Nations and health, international development and issues of social inequality. Students are encouraged to bring their own knowledge and experience as the first step in "thinking like an anthropologist" (i.e. rethinking the taken-for-granted). The emphasis in this course is developing skills (analytical thinking, writing).

This course will be team taught by two professors, each sharing and exploring their own research.

An intensive 6 credit, one term section of this course will also be offered in the winter term.


David Murray                Tania Ahmad
 

ANTH 1130 6.0 Images of Resistance / Irresistible Images: Anthropology Through the Visual

Time: Thurs. 2:30-4:30 TEL 001

This course uses film, video, visual art, photography and social media such as webcams to explore foundational concepts in anthropology. We examine race, ethnicity, nationality, globalization, power, authority, politics, religion, gender, class, and sexuality through images produced by anthropologists as well as commercial and documentary filmmakers, photographers and artists. The course also examines visual representations of non-western cultures within and outside of western contexts, and asks questions about how visual technologies that can look deep into our bodies as well as far out into space are changing our understandings of what it means to be human in the 21st century.


Zulfikar Hirji