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COURSES

  

 

AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 - INTRODUCTION TO WORLD GEOGRAPHY

 

This course explores geographic approaches to disparities of cultural, economic, political and environmental development in major world regions comprising developed capitalist and socialist countries and underdeveloped nations.

 

Expanded Description:  This course takes up issues particular to specific regions and ecologies, and common themes among them, including past and current significance of both human migrations and commodity flows, the birth and shaky persistence of territorial nation states, the rise of regions, and what is at stake in the creation of regions.  A wide variety of topics is covered from a geographical perspective, including the creation of stereotypes associated with different regions; urbanization and industrialization in the third world, migration to North America, international development, war and imperialism, political protest, food and agriculture, indigenous peoples, ethnicity and race, global environmental change, energy politics, and social inequalities.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 1000 6.00.

Format: Two lecture hours and one tutorial hour per week.

Text: Rowntree et al., Diversity Amid Globalization: World Regions, Environment, Development

Assignments: Short answer tests, essay, final exam.

Instructors:  U. Best, V. Preston, R. Roth (CD) T. Sturm

 

AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00 - PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY

 

A study of the physical-biotic environment through a consideration of the character and processes of its components - atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere - and of the spatial distributions which reflect interaction among these components.

 

Expanded Description:  This course introduces principles behind the interpretation of the earth's surface environment. It is divided into three sections climate, landforms, and biogeography. Interrelations among these environmental components are stressed. Topics include: (a) the atmosphere and climate radiation and heating of the earth atmosphere, atmospheric water and precipitation, weather types and frequencies, large and small scale climate zones, climate change and the greenhouse effect; (b) drainage systems, runoff and water balance, rock weathering and debris movements on slopes, the work of rivers and glaciers, landforms in Canada; (c) the biosphere (natural and modified) energy and ecosystems, small and large scale ecosystems, soils and their development and modification, human impact on the biosphere.

 

Course credit exclusions: AK/GEOG 2510 6.00, AS/GEOG 1400 6.00, SC/GEOG 1400 6.00.

Format: Two lecture hours per week, three laboratory hours normally every second week. Two terms.

Text: de Blij, HJ, Muller, PO, Williams, RS, Conrad, CT & Long P. 2009 Physical Geography: The Global Environment.

Second Canadian Edition.

Assignments: Lab exercises (40%); six in-class tests (60%).

Instructors:  R. Bello, T. Drezner, A. Robert (CD),

  

AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 - HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

 

 An introduction to the study of human geography with an emphasis on the geographical aspects of culture, society, politics, economy, cities, and the environment.

 

Expanded Description:  Human geography seeks to understand both the spatial organization of human activities and the meanings attached to the places and regions where these activities are found. The objectives of this course are to: define geography as a discipline, and introduce its current ideas, especially those of human geography; exemplify various approaches used in studying human geography;  introduce the main sub-fields of human geography (many of which you can study in more detail in subsequent more specialized courses);  introduce at an elementary level some of the techniques and methods of analysis used by geographers; and relate geography to the broader debates in the social sciences

 

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 1410 6.00 and AK/GEOG 2500 6.00.

Format: Two lecture hours per week, two tutorial hours normally every second week.

Required Reading: Knox, Paul L., Sally A. Marston, Alan E. Nash Human Geography: Places and Regions in the Global Context, 3rd Canadian edition, Prentice-Hall.  Other supplemental readings will be assigned.

Assignments: Assignments (54%), two exams (36%), and tutorial participation (10%).

Instructors: R. Basu, B. Erickson, R. Das, S. Tufts (CD),

 

 AP/GEOG 2020 6.00 - GEOGRAPHICAL TRANSFORMATION OF THE CARIBBEAN ISLANDS

 

This course analyzes the geographic status of the Caribbean islands. It examines how interactions between natural-environmental factors and human activities since the beginnings of settlement account for the current appearance, character, problems and prospects for individual islands and for the region.

 

Expanded Description:  This course analyzes the geographical changes that have occurred in the islands of the Caribbean since 1492, including changes in population, economy, environmental conditions, social conditions, and political status. Current economic, social and environmental problems are related to a long series of transformations over the past 500 years, transformations which have led to migration, radical changes in the use of land, reshaping of the landscape, and to the development of unique Caribbean cultures. Geographical changes are traced using texts, maps, data, pictures, and video. Lectures, illustrations, and related data are compiled on the course's comprehensive website.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2020 6.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week.

Coursebook of Selected Readings: (York University Bookstore) MacMillan Caribbean Certificate Atlas (3rd Ed.), MacMillan Caribbean, 2001, Potter, R. et al., "The Contemporary Caribbean", Harlow, Pearson Education, 2004, Rogozinski, J., A Brief History of the Caribbean (Revised Edition), New York,

Penguin Putnam, 2000;

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 2030 3.00 - THE END OF THE EARTH AS WE KNOW IT: GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE

 

This course explores how human society has transformed the earth system and investigates the social, economic and political implications of contemporary environmental change. Topics include deforestation, climate change, biodiversity loss and natural disasters such as hurricanes, flooding and drought. Internet access is required.

 

This course is designed to introduce students to human-environment geography by exploring both historical and contemporary human-induced transformations of the earth system. The objectives are to better understand how and why the global environment is changing; what the societal implications of these changes are; and the ways in which individuals and societies adapt to, respond to, and mitigate environmental change. We will investigate the decision to act and the decision not to act on the part of individuals, governments, activist organizations and corporations.

 

While it is tempting to see global environmental change as a large scale phenomenon and problem, it is not limited to the global scale. Both the impacts of global environmental change (GEC) and responses to it occur across scale and are geographically variable. In order to stress this dimension of GEC, this course will examine the local manifestations of these global processes. Much of our tutorial discussion regarding the effects of and responses to global environmental change will be focused on three locales: Highland Thailand, Urban Canada: Toronto and Arctic Canada.

 

Recommended prerequisites: AP/GEOG 1000 6.00, AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2030 3.00.

Format: Weekly lecture and tutorials

Assignments:  Tutorial component 60%; and final 40%

Required Reading:  To be announced.

Instructor:  R. Roth

 

AP GEOG 2060 3.00 - HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

An exploration of the content of and approaches to historical geography, with a focus on major historical shifts in the geography and geographic knowledge of human beings, such as imperialism, mass migration and urbanization.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2060 3.00.

Format:  Three lecture hours per week.

Required Reading:  To be announced.

Assignments:  To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.

  

AP/GEOG 2070 3.00 - EMPIRE, STATE & POWER: AN INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY

 

This course explores the geography, ideology, expansion and representation of empire, colonialism, settlers and colonized. The historical-geographical perspective will highlight the importance of space and place as mechanisms of control and domination, at multiple scales.

 

Expanded Description:  Throughout this course, emphasis is placed on a critical reading and analysis of the ideology, expansion and representation of empire, colonialism, settlers and the colonized. The historical-geographical perspective will highlight the importance of space and place as mechanism of control and domination, at multiple scales. Topics covered include imperial geography; geography and ideology of empire; British Empire; slave trade; French Empire and colonialism; the Maghreb and colonial rule; Empire of Japan; Japanese colonization of Korea and; Canada and colonialism; empire and culture; and empire, knowledge and scholarship. Throughout the course concepts and discussions of gender, race, sexuality and borders will be addressed and incorporated into each week’s lectures. This course will emphasize not only a critical understanding of empire and colonialism through texts and readings, but also through maps and photographs. Case studies include readings on Jamaica, Morocco, Algeria and Korea.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2070 3.00

Format: Three lecture hours per week

Required Readings:  Please refer to course syllabus for required reading list.

Assignments: Participation (15%), short essay (25%), assignment (25%), final exam (35%)

Instructor: B. Erickson

 

 

AP/GEOG 2075 3.00 - EVERYDAY LIFE - INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY

 

This course critically explores 'everyday life' and the spaces and places through which it is experiences, reproduced, represented and negotiated. Topics covered include, geographies of mobility; urban parks; geographies of capitalism; geographies of cinema; surveillance; geographies of boredom and silence; geographies of deliberation and everyday sites of citizenship and identity formation.

 

Expanded Description:  Throughout this course, emphasis is placed on a critical reading and analysis of ‘everyday life’ and the spaces and places through which it is experienced, represented and negotiated. Students will be introduced to important socio-spatial theorists who have demonstrated that the ‘everyday’, ‘banal’ and ‘common’ are as important as the ‘macro’, ‘global’ and ‘exceptional’, and that, in fact, they are inseparable. As such, the concept of scale and scalar processes will be emphasized in the lectures and assignments. Topics covered include, geographies of mobility; urban parks; geographies of capitalism; geographies of cinema; the banality of surveillance; geographies of boredom and silence; geographies of deliberation and everyday sites of citizenship and identity formation. Other than academic readings, students will be asked to consider other means/media of sharing and constructing knowledge about everyday life, including their own knowledge about everyday life spaces. Photographs, novels, visual art and music will be used to demonstrate how geographies of everyday life are articulated and represented in other practices of everyday life. Notions of gender, class, race, sexuality will be incorporated into each week’s lectures and discussions.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2075 3.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week

Required Reading: Please refer to course syllabus for required reading list.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: B. Erickson

 


AP/GEOG 2105 3.00 - MONEY, POWER AND SPACE:  INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY

 

This course introduces the field of economic geography, addressing spatial dimensions of: wealth and poverty; structures of production and commodity chains; patterns and processes of retailing and consumption; the role of states in economic governance; the struggles of organized labour; the organization of transnational corporations; and, the ways in which ethnic identity and gender shape economic life.

 

Prerequisites: One of AP/GEOG 1000 6.00, AP/GEOG 1410 6.00, AK/GEOG 2500 6.00, or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusions: AP/GEOG 2100 6.00 and AP/GEOG 2105 6.00.

Format:  Three lecture hours per week.

Required Reading: Coe, N. Kelly, P. Yeung, H (2007) Economic Geography:

Assignments:  In-class tests(15%) each, Analytical Assignment (30%) Reading Response Papers (40%)

Instructor: P. Kelly

 

AP/GEOG 2220 6.00 - URBAN GEOGRAPHY

 

In a world where over 50 per cent of the population lives in urban areas, cities play a significant role in shaping the social, cultural, economic, political, and environmental conditions of people's everyday
lives. This course introduces the geographical literature on the urbanization process in historical and contemporary perspective. It provides students with the foundations of urban processes and patterns, urban systems and structure, and urban social/cultural issues from a geographical perspective.


Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 3120 6.00 and AK/GEOG 3430 6.00.
Format:      Three hours per week.
Required reading: Bunting, T., Filion, P. & Walker, R. (eds) (2010) Canadian Cities in Transition: New Directions in the Twenty-First Century, 4th Edition. Toronto: Oxford University Press.
Assignments: Two assignments (60%); participation (10%); and mid-term
and final exam (30%)

Instructor: A. Bain

 

 

AP/GEOG 2300 6.00 - SOCIAL GEOGRAPHY

 

A study of social processes underlying spatial patterns, relationships and interactions within and among social groups. The course examines urban and rural social structures within their spatial settings, focusing on social and environmental problems and solutions.

 

Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Format: To be announced.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.

  

 

AP/GEOG 2305 3.00 – Indentities: Introduction to Social Geography

 

This course examines the production, reproduction and mediation of identities through space and place at various scales. The course will introduce students to the complex relations between space, place and identity, and ask them to think critically about the spaces of their own lives.

 

Expanded Description:  Throughout this course, emphasis is placed on a critical reading and analysis of the production, reproduction and mediation of identities though space, place and scales. This course will introduce students to the complex relations between space, place and identity, as well as the ways in which these relations and their practices are manifested in space and time. Topics covered include imperialism, colonialism and national identities; citizenship and identity politics; mobility and identity; race, class and identity formation, politics and movements; criminalized identities; museums and architecture; global cities; globalization and postmodernity; corporate identities; and sexualities and genders. In addition to academic readings, students will be asked to consider the ways in which architecture, maps, photographs, political slogans, corporate logos, visual art, music, and film help construct, represents and mediate identities.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2305 3.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week.

Required Reading: Gill Valentine (2001), Social Geographies: Space and Society, Prentice Hall.

Assignments: Midterm (20%); three assignments (50%); and final exam (30%).

Instructor: T. Sturm

 


AP/GEOG 2310 6.00 - INTRODUCTION TO REFUGEE AND MIGRATION STUDIES

 

An introduction to the problem of refugees: conceptual issues (definitions, refugee rights, ethical norms), the historical background, Canadian policy and the issues in specific areas of the world - Africa, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and the Middle East.

 

Cross-listed with AP/REI 2000 6.0

Prerequisite: A 1000-level social science course.

Course credit exclusions: AP/SOSC 1130 9.00, AP/SOSC 1139 9.00, AS/GEOG 2310 6.0, AK/SOSC 2000 6.0

Format: Three lecture hours weekly

Required Reading: course kit

Assignment: Mid-term 20%, final exam 20%, two assignments 40%, participation 20%

Instructor: M. J. Kwak

 

AP/SC/GEOG 2340 3.00 - GEOINFORMATICS: INTRODUCTION

 

This course covers fundamental concepts and approaches of geographical information systems, remote sensing and global positioning systems. Students also acquire knowledge and skills in descriptive statistics, map design and interpretation, and basic computer cartography.

 

Expanded Description:  Geoinformatics integrates computer science, geosciences, and certain branches of engineering such that the geographical context of space and location form a critical component in a new information infrastructure. This course will introduce and explore the importance of geodesy, geographic positioning, photogrammetry, remote sensing, geographic information systems, and various other spatial technologies. Suitable for geographers and Education students majoring in geography, this course will provide a foundation to geoinformatics and basic computer cartography. Computers and other geoinformatics technologies will be used in lab sessions and basic computer skills are a prerequisite. Some labs will require outdoor data collection on campus. Basic arithmetic skills required.

 

Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusions: LE/EATS 2610 2.00, SC/ENG 2110 2.00, AP/SC GEOG 2350 3.00

Format: Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week

Required Reading: Shellito, B.A. 2012. Introduction to geospatial technologies. W.H. Freemand and Company: New York. 369 p.

Assignments: Assignments 40%, test 20%, discussion forum 5%, final exam 35%

Instructor: T. Remmel

 


AP/SC/GEOG 2400 6.00 - THE HYDROSPHERE

 

This course examines the physical processes and the environmental factors that govern the movement of water and energy in lakes, rivers, oceans and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. Boundary-layer climates and mechanisms of water movement and storage are emphasized.

 

Expanded Description:  This course examines the movement and storage of water in various phases near the Earth’s surface and the energy driving the hydrologic cycle. The focus is on the interdependency of water and energy in the hydrosphere. The course begins with a discussion of basic atmospheric and hydrologic processes and then traces the flow of energy and water to and beneath the earth’s surface. Then the return of water from the subsurface to the atmosphere is examined, initially in simple vegetation-free environments and finally in more complex forest systems. Aspects of the cryosphere (snow and ice), and the lateral redistribution of water as runoff on slopes and in drainage basins will also be examined. We will also investigate some of the implications for changing land-use and climate change of these processes. The course is designed to combine a theoretical understanding of the hydrosphere with applied field measurements.

 

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00, AK/GEOG 2510 6.00

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 2400 6.00.

Format: Two lecture hours per week, 16 three-hour laboratories over two terms.

Required Reading: Oke, T.R., (1987), Boundary Layer Climates, Methuen & Co. Ltd. Ward, R.C. and T. Robinson, (2001), Principles of Hydrology, Prentice Hall. Supplemental readings will be placed on reserve in the Geography Geographic Resources Centre.

Assignments: Four tests, eight laboratory exercises.

Instructor: R. Bello, K. Young

 

AP/SC/GEOG 2420 3.00 - INTRODUCTORY STATISTICAL ANALYSIS IN GEOGRAPHY

 

This introductory course aims to provide a working knowledge of several statistical techniques which are widely used in many branches of geography. Some attention is also given to broader questions concerning the nature of the scientific method.

 

Expanded Description:  The course aims to provide the fundamental concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics and a working knowledge of several standard statistical techniques which are widely used in many different branches of geography.  Examples of such techniques include measures of central tendency and dispersion (descriptive statistics), comparisons of means and proportions (inferential statistics) and correlation and regression analyses (analyzing relationships and causation).  These techniques are used in numerous disciplines, and are not in themselves 'geographical'.  Consideration will be given to the nature of geographical data and the examples used in lectures and assignments will be geographical in content.  Emphasis will be placed on the concepts underlying each procedure as much as on the mechanics of the numerical calculations.  This policy reflects the belief that "knowing why" is just as important as "knowing how".  Computers will be used in the lab sessions but no prior knowledge of computers or specific computer programs is assumed.

 

Prerequisites: 24 credits successfully completed. This course is intended primarily for students majoring in geography and is normally taken during the second year of study. NCR: AK/GEOG 3520 3.00.

Course credit exclusions: AP/ECON 2500 3.00, AP/POLS 3300 6.00, AP/SOCI 3030 6.00, HH/KINE 2050 3.00, HH/KINE 3150 3.00, HH/PSYC 2020 6.00, HH/PSYC 2021 3.00, SC/BIOL 2060 3.00, SC/MATH 2560 3.00, SC/MATH 2565 3.00, SC/MATH 2570 3.00, AK/ADMS 3320 3.00

Format: Two lecture hours per week, nine two-hour laboratory sessions. One term.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

 

Instructor: T. Drezner (F), S. Tank (W)

 


AP/SC/GEOG 2500 3.00 - INTRODUCTION TO VEGETATION AND SOILS

                                                         

An introduction to the structure and functioning of vegetation and soil systems, emphasizing local patterns and processes, methods of description and sampling, dynamic processes, response to environmental change and human disturbance. Field work is emphasized in laboratories.

 

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00 or ES/ENVS 2500 6.00

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2500 3.00.

Format: Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Course Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/SC/GEOG 2600 3.00 - GEOMORPHOLOGY I

 

This course concentrates on basic principles and fundamental concepts in geomorphology, including energy flows in geomorphic systems, hill slope forms and materials, weathering and landforms, and drainage basin geomorphology and hydrology (with a particular emphasis on Canadian examples). 

 

Expanded Description:  The course opens with a brief survey of the history of geomorphology as a science. It then surveys modes of formulating significant geomorphological questions and predominant modes of investigation. The course then concentrates on basic principles and fundamental concepts in geomorphology (with a particular emphasis on Canadian examples). Being process-oriented, the course is based on a quantitative approach. The main topics addressed include energy flows in geomorphic systems, hillslope forms and materials, weathering and landforms, drainage basin geomorphology and hydrology, the physical geography of Canada, and periglacial geomorphology. A course website is used.

 

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00 or LE/EATS 1010 3.00.

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 2600 3.00,

Format: Three lecture hours per week.

Assignments: Mid-term test: 30%; final exam: 40%; Term paper: 30%.

Required Reading:  Trenhaile, A. 2007. Geomorphology, A Canadian Perspective, (3rd edition), Oxford University Press

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/SC/GEOG 2610 3.00 - GEOMORPHOLOGY II - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course concentrates on geomorphic processes and landforms (with a particular emphasis on Canadian examples). Five main areas are explored: fluvial forms and processes; the glaciation of Canada and glacial mechanics; periglaciation; aeolian processes; and coastal processes and landforms.

 

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 2600 3.00.

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 2610 3.00.

Format:  To be announced.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments:  To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.

 

  

AP/GEOG 3010 6.00 -  GEOGRAPHY OF CANADA

                                                                     

A study of basic physical and human geographical patterns in Canada, stressing the processes which produced the latter, and selected characteristics of major Canadian regions.

 

Expanded Description:  This Canadian regional geography course explores the physical, economic, political, social, cultural, and historical development of Canada as an urbanized nation.  Lectures in the first term use the core-periphery model to frame discussions of the importance of transportation and communication networks to the development of regionally-based staples economies.  Lectures in the second term use the spatial scale of the city-region to frame discussions of contemporary urban issues.

 

Prerequisite: One of AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00.

Course credit exclusions: AK/GEOG 3540 6.00, AS/GEOG 3010 6.00.

Format:  Three lecture hours per week.

Required reading:  Course kit.

Assignments:  Four assignments (60%); and mid-term test/final examination (40%)

Instructor:  R. Anderson

 

AP/GEOG 3020 6.00 - GEOGRAPHICAL TRANSFORMATION OF THE CARIBBEAN ISLANDS

 

This course analyzes the geographic status of the Caribbean islands. It examines how interactions between natural-environmental factors and human activities since the beginnings of settlement account for the current appearance, character, problems and prospects for individual islands and for the region.

 

Expanded Description:  This course analyzes the geographical changes that have occurred in the islands of the Caribbean since 1492, including changes in population, economy, environmental conditions, social conditions, and political status. Current economic, social and environmental problems are related to a long series of transformations over the past 500 years, transformations which have led to migration, radical changes in the use of land, reshaping of the landscape, and to the development of unique Caribbean cultures. Geographical changes are traced using texts, maps, data, pictures, and video. Lectures, illustrations, and related data are compiled on the course's comprehensive website.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2020 6.00, AP GEOG 2020 6.00

Format: Three lecture hours per week.

Coursebook of Selected Readings: (York University Bookstore) MacMillan Caribbean Certificate Atlas (3rd Ed.), MacMillan Caribbean, 2001, Potter, R. et al., "The Contemporary Caribbean", Harlow, Pearson Education, 2004, Rogozinski, J., A Brief History of the Caribbean (Revised Edition), New York,

Penguin Putnam, 2000;

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

 


AP/GEOG 3030 3.00 - PEOPLING OF ONTARIO

 

This course deals with the process of an agricultural population occupying a new territory, gradually developing it, and participating in its transformation from rural - to urban-dominated.  There will be a strong historical emphasis, especially embracing the 19th and early 20th centuries, and a number of specific aspects and demographic trends will be followed into recent decades.  The peopling of Ontario will be placed in the context of the peopling of Canada.  Attention will be paid to emigration and immigration and to the ethnic component at various periods. 

 

Course credit exclusions: AK/GEOG 3550D 3.00 (prior to Summer 2004), AK/GEOG 3550D 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 1998-1999), AK/GEOG 3550 3.00.

Format:  Three lecture hours per week.

Required reading:  To be announced.

Assignments:  To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 3040 3.00 - URBAN ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE

 

This course examines how processes of urbanization result in the unequal spatial and social distribution of environmental goods (e.g., pollution, toxic waste, landfills) in North American cities. It investigates the ways in which cities, as dynamic human ecologies in their own right, have increasingly become sites of environmental contestation, and explores the articulation of social justice, urbanization and environmentalism.

 

Course credit exclusion: AK/GEOG 3520 3.00, AP/HIST 3891 3.00

Format: Three hours of lecture per week.

Assignments: To be announced.

Required text: To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 3050 3.00 - NATURE, POWER & SOCIETY

 

This course examines the geographic understanding of nature-society relationships. We review popular and scientific theories of environmental change, conflict and conservation, and examine the role that politics and power play in shaping ecological problems and issues.

 

Expanded Description:  This course explores the role that politics and power play in shaping ecological problems and issues.  With reference primarily to the developing world, we will review dominant apolitical understandings of environmental issues, such as deforestation, land degradation, pollution and biodiversity loss.  We will then introduce a political ecological approach to understanding environmental change, conflict and conservation.

 

Prerequisites: 54 credits completed including at least three credits in geography (GEOG) or permission of the instructor.

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 3050 3.00 and AS/GEOG 3050 6.00

Format: Three hours of lecture and discussion per week.

Assignments: To be announced.

Required text: To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.

 


AP/GEOG 3060 3.00 - POST-COLONIAL GEOGRAPHIES

 

This course examines the particular landscapes produced by colonialism and the struggles to move beyond it. Attention is paid to the use of space and place as mechanisms of control and liberation. Examples are international, and concern fictional and non-fictional landscapes.

 

Prerequisite: 54 credits successfully completed.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3060 3.00.

Format: Three hours of lecture and discussion per week.

Assignments: To be announced.

Required text: To be announced.

Instructor:  B. Erickson

 

AP/GEOG 3070 6.00 - GENDER, MIGRATION AND POPULATION - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

Characteristics and problems in growth and distribution of human populations, including birth, fertility and death rates, population growth and environment, globalization and migration and population control policies.

 

Prerequisite: 54 credits successfully completed.

Course credit exclusion: AK/SOCI 3880D 6.00, AP/GEOG 4070 6.00

Format: Three seminar hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments:  To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 3080 3.00 - READING LANDSCAPES THROUGH TIME

 

Cultural landscapes change over time. This can result from changes in legal tenure, cultural adaptation, changes in the economic base or historical events. This course considers landscapes in various countries in chronological sequence.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3080 3.00.

Format: Three hours of lecture and discussion per week.

Assignments: To be announced.

Required text: To be announced.

Instructor:  R. Anderson

 

AP/GEOG 3081 3.00 - HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHIES OF MODERN IRELAND - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course explores selected themes on the historical geography of Ireland, concentrating on the period since 1600. Attention is paid to the role and impact of economic, cultural, and political processes (including colonialism, famine, migration, nationalism and partition) that have shaped Irish landscapes and senses of place.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3081 3.00, AP/HIST 3460 6.00

Format: Three hours of lecture and discussion per week.

Assignments: To be announced.

Required text: To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.

 


AP/GEOG 3130 3.00 - THE GLOBAL ECONOMY

                                                                                  

This course examines the evolution of the world economy as well as the major institutions that have supported it, and interprets the new geography of investment, production and consumption that accompanies it.

 

Expanded Description:  The world economy has evolved over a long period marked by the globalization of trade, investment and, more recently, production. The course will begin by tracing this evolution and its geography. The course will then focus on contemporary world economy, and in particular the following elements: patterns of world trade and the Traid; transnational corporations; direct foreign investment and global finance; world cities; international migration; global institutions; and cultural imperialism. It will conclude by examining local-global conflicts.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3130 3.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week.

Required Reading: Course reading kit.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 3140 3.00 - RETAILING, SHOPPING, SOCIETY AND SPACE                                                              

 

This course provides an overview of consumer shopping behaviour, the structure and process of retail location, and various social and economic issues associated with the contemporary retail economy. The geographical perspective is emphasized.

 

Expanded Description:  This course is about the geography of needs, opportunities and enterprises. It aims to provide an overview on consumer shopping behavior, the structure and process of retail location, and the various economic, social and cultural issues associated with the contemporary retail economy.  It also introduces the use of GIS as an analytical tool in retail analysis and location decision-making, and integrate its usage with various data sources. Topics discussed include but are not limited to: geodemographics and market segmentation; store location, store choice and market analysis; corporate spatial strategies; planned commercial development and redevelopment; new retail formats; internalization of retailing; shopping, leisure and lifestyle; impact on the workforce; and culture of consumption.

 

Prerequisites: 54 credits passed, including AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusions: AK/GEOG 3100 3.00, AS/GEOG 3140 3.00.

Format: Lectures and computer labs

Required Reading: Readings will be provided as a course kit.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

AP/SC/GEOG 3200 3.00 - TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS

 

An examination of the structure and function of vegetation and soil systems. The course focuses on such topics as the adjustment of ecosystems to human modification and the role of biogeography in conservation and resource management.

 

Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including one of AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00 or ES/ENVS 2420 3.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3200 3.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: S. Tank

 


AP/GEOG 3220 3.00 - ADVANCED URBAN GEOGRAPHY 

 

This course addresses significant contemporary urban issues that frame geographic understandings of metropolitan change in the twenty-first century.
Attention is directed towards understanding how cities are produced, consumed, and theorized as complex social, economic, ecological, and political systems.  Case studies are drawn from Canada and other countries in the Global North and
Global South. Through lectures, discussion, and assignments students are encouraged to challenge geographical interpretations of the urban world, and to think critically about cities as products of capital investment, as collective public goods, and as socio-cultural spaces.

 

Prerequisites: 54 credits including AP/GEOG 2220 6.00.

Course credit exclusion: AK/GEOG 4180 6.00

Format: Three lecture hours per week

Required reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructors: A. Bain

 

AP/GEOG 3250 3.00 - ENVIRONMENTAL PERCEPTION AND DISASTERS

 

This course assesses the way people perceive their environment. Initially the course considers the theory of environmental perception. Considerable emphasis is placed on appraisal of natural and technological hazards and cultural perception.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3250 3.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week

Required reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: R. Anderson

 

AP/GEOG 3300 3.00 - SPACE/PLACE - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course explores the construction, reproduction and representation of space, place and scale. Students are introduced to important socio-spatial theories that have affected how geographers understand such key concepts, including feminism, Marxism and postmodernism.

 

Prerequisites: 54 credits passed.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3300 3.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: T. Sturm


AP/SC/GEOG 3340 3.00GEOINFORMATICS: GIS I

 

An introduction to the application of GIS to geographical/environmental problems. A broad conceptual overview of GIS approaches and their strengths and limitations. Students gain hands-on experience in the use of raster-based GIS technology with particular reference to resource management and planning topics.

 

Expanded Description:  The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the basic concepts and tools used in GIS. The lectures will review technical aspects, examine various case studies and discuss critical perspectives using GIS.

 

At the end of the course, students should be able to understand how to develop some strategies for using GIS techniques in their own work and research. During the term, assignments will be structured to enable students to undertake their own research investigations using GIS.

 

These assignments will lead up to a final group project depending on the student’s area of interest (e.g. issues related to social, political, economic, planning, health or environmental themes). Students gain hands-on experience using the MapInfo Professional GIS software package.

 

Topics covered during the lectures will include: map as model; data input; cartographic and GIS data structures; data storage, errors and editing; elementary spatial analysis; measurement; map comparison; classification; spatial arrangement; Ethics and GIS: privacy and confidentiality.

 

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 2420 3.00.

Course credit exclusions: ES/ENVS 3520 3.00, AP/AS/SC GEOG 3180 3.00

Format: Two lecture hours and two laboratory hour per week

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.


AP/SC/GEOG 3360 3.00 - MORPHOGENESIS OF SOILS

 

This course is concerned with the systematic study of climate, vegetation, parent material, topography and time on the development, classification and chemistry of soils. A field trip and laboratory work will form part of this course.

 

Course credit exclusions: AK/GEOG 3360 3.00 and AK/GEOG 3360 6.00.

Format: Combination of lecture, labwork, & fieldwork

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: W. Mahaney

 

AP/GEOG 3370 3.00 - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: CRITICAL GEOGRAPHICAL PERSPECTIVES

 

The course deals with conceptual debates on 'Third World' development. It explores issues of development including economic growth and poverty, resource use, agrarian change, industrial transformation, service-sector development, rural-urban inequality, gender relations, neoliberalism and imperialism, and prospect for democracy and macro-level structural social change in the less developed world.

 

Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 3370 3.00, AS/GEOG 4370 3.00.

Format: Three hours per week

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: Midterm 30%, final exam 30%, short paper 25%, project 15%

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 3400 3.00 - DIMENSIONS OF DIFFERENCE: GEOGRAPHY OF GENDER, RACE AND POWER

 

This course considers the construction, reproduction and representation of identity and difference in, through and across space and time. This course will introduce students to important feminist theorists and academics that have affected how geographers understand social relations through space, including gender relations and their intersection with race and power relations.

 

Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3400 3.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor:  T. Sturm

 

AP/SC/GEOG 3421 3.00 - INTERMEDIATE STATISTICAL METHODS IN GEOGRAPHY –

 NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course examines the application of methods of geographical analysis to empirical data sets representing geographical and ecological phenomena. Bivariate linear regression and multiple regression and time/spatial series are emphasized.

 

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 2420 3.00 or equivalent.

Course credit exclusions: AP/SC/MATH 3033 3.00, AP/SC/MATH 3034 3.00, AP/SC/MATH 3230 3.00, AP/SC/MATH 3330 3.00, AP/POLS 3300 6.00, AP/SC/PSYC 2020 6.00, AP/SC/PSYC 2022 3.00, AS/SOCI 3030 6.00 and HH/PSYC 3030 3.00.

Format: Two lecture hours, two laboratory hours. One term.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.

 

AP/SC/GEOG 3440 3.00 - GEOINFORMATICS: REMOTE SENSING I                     

 

This course represents an introduction to the methods in which remote sensing data are collected, processed and analyzed. An emphasis is placed on environmental applications. The synergy between the technologies of remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) is also stressed.

 

Expanded Description:  Remote sensing is introduced as the process of examining, measuring, and studying our planet from a distance, without physical contact. As an extension of photography, remote sensing relies on an understanding and digital recording of energy interactions at or near the surface of the Earth and within the atmosphere. The science of these interactions will be presented as a foundation to understanding the theoretical utility and application of remote sensing techniques. This course will then explore the typical sequence of image acquisition, processing, classification analysis, and accuracy assessment as related to physical and human influenced environments.

 

Cross-Listed:  ES/ENVS 3521 3.00

Prerequisites: AP/SC/GEOG 2420 3.00 or ES/ENVS 2010 6.00 and one 2000-level environmental studies theme foundation course; or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3440 3.00.

Format: Two lecture and two laboratory hours per week.

Required Reading: Campbell, J.B. 2007. Introduction to remote sensing (4th ed.). New York: The Guilford Press. 626 p, Supplementary articles will be provided.

Assignments: 5 assignments 40%; weekly lab exercises 5%; test 15%; discussion forum 5%, and final exam 35%

Instructor: T. Remmel

 


AP/GEOG 3490 3.00 - MAKING CANADA - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course investigates the historical transformations of Canada's geography prior to the 20th century, including settlement by indigenous peoples, resettlement by colonizing and immigrant populations, the expansion of the nation-state's territory, land clearance, resource extraction and related geographies of the labour force, the creation of national parks, and urbanization.

 

Expanded Description:  In clarifying the changing geography of Canada from the eighteenth century to the opening of the twentieth century, this course will highlight transformative developments in the expansion of the country across the continent.  Special topics might include the evolution from colony to self-governing nation, the role and treatment of aboriginal populations, the importance and materials of transportation, the entry of old world populations, way-of-life and cultural comparisons among regions, and the rise of urbanization.

 

Course credit exclusion: AK/GEOG 3490 6.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/SC/GEOG 3500 3.00 - BIOGEOGRAPHY

 

An analysis of the geography of plants and animals emphasizing processes that operate at the population level, the origin and diversity of plants and animals, geographic patterns of diversity, and dynamics of species populations from local to continental scales.

 

Same as SC/BIOL 3500 3.00

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 2500 3.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3500 3.00.

Format: Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 3510 3.00 - METHODS OF SEDIMENT

 

An examination of methods of laboratory analysis of soils and sediments including soil/sediment sampling, particle size, water and organic component analyses, microscopic analysis and data interpretation. Special emphasis is placed on methods of analysis in soil/sediment research.

 

Course credit exclusion: AK/GEOG 3370 3.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor:  W. Mahaney

 


AP/SC/GEOG 3540 3.00 - FIELD STUDIES IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY

 

This course begins with lectures on field research methodology. The second phase concentrates on defining a field problem, leading to data collection in the field.  The final part of the course deals with data analysis, and reviews methodological implications. Two two-hour periods per week (including lectures, seminars and workshops), a three to four day field trip. One term.

 

Expanded Description:  The course is an introduction to research design and methodology in physical geography.  The course integrates on-campus preparation and report writing with off-campus fieldwork during which data collection and preliminary analysis are carried out.  The fieldwork relates to a geographic problem offering scope for the special interests of students in various aspects of physical geography.   

 

Prerequisites: Students must be registered as Honours majors in Geography or Environmental Science and must have successfully completed AP/GEOG 2420 3.00 and one of AP/GEOG 2400 6.00, AP/GEOG 2500 3.00 or AP/GEOG 2600 3.00; or permission of the instructor.

 

Course credit exclusions: AK/MATH 3330 3.00, AS/GEOG 4540 3.00, AS/SC/GEOG 3390B 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2002-2003) and AS/SC/GEOG 3420 3.00.

Format: Two two-hour periods per week (including lectures, seminars and workshops), a three to four day field trip. One term.

Grading: Field participation 20%, seminar presentation 35% and final report: 45%.

Reading and Resource Material: Suggestions for readings will be made once research topics have been identified.

Instructor: K. Young

 

**ADDITIONAL FEES MAY BE INCURRED TO COVER THE EXPENSE OF TRANSPORTATION AND ACCOMMODATION FOR OUT-OF-TOWN FIELD TRIPS.**

 

 

AP/GEOG 3590 3.00 - CONSERVATION IN CANADA - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course investigates the significance of conservation in Canada, charting its history, and examining the socio-political and economic trends that gave rise to a particular vision of conservation.  The course additionally examines the social and environmental effects of conservation policies and practices and the significance of these measures for the Canadian nation-state. 

 

Course Credit Exclusion: AK/GEOG 3590 6.0

Format: Three lecture hours per week

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

 


AP/GEOG 3600 3.00 - NATIONS AND NATIONALISM - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course examines theories, geographies and histories of nations, nationalisms and nation-states.

 

Expanded Description:  The purpose of this course is to investigate the rise of modern nations and nationalisms and the ways in which they shape our lives in both profound and seemingly trivial ways. We will focus in particular on:

 

 

While the course will cover various theories of nations and nationalism, we will explore these within geographically and historically specific contexts.   The course aims to help students develop the conceptual tools to critically evaluate various nations and nationalisms and to see what is at stake—politically, economically, socially, and environmentally—in their formulation.

 

To this end, we will examine nations and nationalisms in relation to several overlapping concepts and areas of inquiry, including space and geography, “nature,” identities and bodies, multicultural and indigenous nationalisms, and globalization.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3600 3.00.

Format: Three hours per week: combination of lecture and discussion

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 3650 6.00 - WIRED CITIES:  COMMUNITY, TECHNOLOGY AND CHANGING URBAN PLACES

 

Examines the impact of technology on urban form, urban function and community. Emphasis is placed on the social, economic and political parameters of urban infrastructure, community formation, and everyday life in the wake of technological change.

 

Expanded Description:  Topics that will be explored will include the following: urban form and function and the impact of technological change on urban places; urban infrastructure and technology; cities as communication nexus and the evolution of communication technologies; community and neighborhood formation in the Information Age; the impact on individuals and the family; privacy issues; access to information; issues of governance; nationalism and globalization; and speculations about the future of cities.

Note: You do not need to be a computer or Internet 'expert' to take this course, but you should have a working knowledge of e-mail and also be somewhat familiar with using a web browser (Internet Explorer, Netscape, Safari, etc.) as the entire course is organized around these two activities.  You may use your own computer at home, or ones located in the University's computer labs to participate in this course.

 

Course credit exclusion: AK/AS/GEOG 3650 6.00.

Format: Internet course. No face-to-face lectures or tutorials. Participation in online course discussion groups is mandatory. Course website: http://www.yorku.ca/lcode/wiredcities/

Required Reading: Graham, Stephen and Simon Marvin (2001). Splintering Urbanism: Networked Infrastructures, Technological Mobilities and the Urban Condition. New York: Routledge. Additional online readings will be indicated during 1st week of classes.

Evaluation: Participation 20%, written assignments 35%, research essay 25%, and final exam 20%.

Instructor: To be announced.

 


AP/GEOG 3700 3.00 - DISASTER! EARTH’S EXTREME EVENTS

 

Geographical perspectives on the physical processes behind extreme natural events (volcanoes, tsunami, tornadoes, hurricanes) and their impact on people. Many case studies and the literature will be used to understand how physical geography impacts human activities and settlements.

 

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 2600 3.00.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Format:  Three lecture hours per week.

Required Reading:  To be announced.

Instructor:  T. Drezner

 

AP/GEOG 3710 3.00 - SOCIETY, SPACE AND ENVIRONMENT IN SOUTH ASIA

NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course deals with the historical-geographical specificities of South Asia that are products of its own internal economic-political evolution and physical environmental context as well as of its historical and contemporary linkages to other parts of the world.

 

Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including at least one of AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00, or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3710 3.00.

Format:  Three lecture hours per week

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: Map quiz 20%, two short essays 25% each, and final exam 30%

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 3730 6.00 - COMPARATIVE URBAN DEVELOPMENT

**(Please Note:  This course is administered through the Department of Social Science)**

 

Significant dimensions of urbanization and urban-rural relationships are examined comparatively across major world regions, with emphasis upon Africa, Asia and Latin America. Students may choose a regional focus for research papers, including North America. Migration patterns, socio-economic structure of cities, values and images of rural and urban life, employment and planning to meet the needs of growing cities are the principal topics covered.

 

Cross-listed with: AP/SOSC 3730 6.00

Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 3730 6.00.

Format:  Three lecture hours per week

Required Reading: To be announced.

Evaluation: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.


AP/GEOG 3740 3.00 - QUALITATIVE RESEARCH IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY 

 

This course examines qualitative research design and philosophical bases of qualitative approaches to knowledge, as well as practical techniques such as questionnaire surveys, participant observations, interview/focus groups, archival research and content/textual analysis. These techniques are applied in practical settings involving fieldwork.

 

Expanded Description:  This course covers qualitative research design and the philosophical bases of qualitative methodological approaches to knowledge, as well as practical techniques such as questionnaire surveys, participant observation, interviewing/focus groups, archival research and content/textual analysis. These techniques will be applied in practical settings involving field projects. The structure of the course is based on the required textbook, although the order of topics is different. The first half of the course will be organized as a series of lectures and seminar discussions based on assigned readings; after Reading Week, there will be more workshop-type activities as various qualitative research methods are both discussed and experienced in the field.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3740 3.00.

Format:  Three lecture hours per week

Required Reading: To be announced.

Evaluation: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 3750 3.00 - AFRICA:  IMPOVERISHMENT OF A CONTINENT - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course critically examines the changing geography and depletion of Africa's resources from the precolonial to the present, with an emphasis on current events. The course covers a range of topics, including agriculture, natural resource extraction, migration, the slave trade, and AIDS.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3750 3.00.

Format:  Three lecture hours per week

Required Reading: To be announced.

Evaluation: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 3760 3.00- The Philippines: Geographical perspectives on Global Integration

 NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course examines the processes through which the Philippines was, and is, incorporated into the global system.  Topics will include precolonial trade and religious networks; colonial integration into Spanish and American empires; modern integration through Developmental institutions, and manufacturing and resource commodity chains.  Filipino migrations will be given careful consideration, especially those that link the Philippines and Canada.

 

Course credit exclusions: None.

Format:  Three lecture hours per week

Required Reading: To be announced.

Evaluation: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

 


AP/GEOG 3770 3.00 - HOUSING POLICY

**(Please Note:  This course is administered through the Department of Social Science)**

 

The course studies Canadian housing policy using the approaches of economics, political science and public administration. The course examines models of housing markets, the effects of housing policies, the politics and process of policy formation and procedures for policy evaluation.

 

Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including one of AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AP/SOSC 2710 9.00 or permission of the course instructor.

Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 3770 3.00.

Format:  Three lecture hours per week

Required Reading: To be announced.

Evaluation: To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 3800 3.00 - GEOGRAPHIES OF WORK

 

This course examines the geographies of productive and reproductive labour at multiple scales, including global, national, regional, urban, domestic and personal.

 

Expanded Description:  This course explores how human struggles to “make a living” simultaneously shape and are shaped by changing economic landscapes.  The course addresses the different theoretical perspectives on work, both paid and unpaid.  With a primary focus on workers in advanced capitalist economies, the course discusses both new and old spatial divisions of labour and the restructuring of work and workplaces at the international, local and household scales.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3800 3.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week

Evaluation: To be announced.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Instructor:  S. Tufts

 

AP/SC/GEOG 3900 3.00 - PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY OF THE CITY - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course explores the natural and physical systems of the city, focusing on the climate, water, geomorphology, biogeography of the urban landscape, including its built environment.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3900 3.00.

Format:  Three lecture hours per week

Required Reading: To be announced.

Evaluation: To be announced.

 

Instructor:  To be announced.

 

  

**UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED, 4000 LEVEL COURSES ARE ONLY OPEN TO GEOGRAPHY MAJORS AND MINORS WHO HAVE SUCCESSFULLYCOMPLETED AT LEAST 54 CREDITS OR HAVE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THECOURSE INSTRUCTOR.**

 

AP/SC/GEOG 4000 6.00 - HONOURS THESIS

**Only thesis topics in physical geography are eligible for Science (SC) credit.**

 

An independent piece of research done under the supervision of a faculty advisor. The thesis must be submitted before the end of classes in the winter term; an exact date is established each year. There is an oral examination on the Honours thesis.

 

Prerequisite: 84 credits passed.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4000 6.00.

Format:  To be announced.

Required Reading: To be announced.

 

Coordinator:  Chair

 

Deadline for application:  May 31st

 

Note:  In consultation with a faculty advisor, Honours students may choose a topic towards the end of their third year of study, allowing a full year for completion. 

The completed thesis must be submitted on a date selected annually by the course coordinator.  Normally this date falls in late March, shortly before the end of regular classes.   An oral defense of the Honours Thesis is required.  The thesis provides Honours students with an opportunity to work on a major research project of their own choosing or on a project proposed by a faculty member.   Students should seek out an appropriate faculty member who will help to formalize the topic and aid in preparing a detailed outline.  This outline must be approved before the end of the winter term in the third year of study.   Students are invited to examine theses written in past years to obtain an idea of the range and scope of topics that have been addressed.  These are kept in the Geographic Resources Centre (S403 Ross).

 

AP/GEOG 4020 3.00 - PROCESSES OF GEOGRAPHIC CHANGE: THE CARIBBEAN ISLANDS SINCE 1492

NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course considers changes in the public perception of the regional character of the Caribbean Islands through five centuries, and then examines the evidence and methods that can be used to assess regional change - both "real" and "imagined". Note: Weekly reflections posted to WebCT.

 

Expanded Description: The course examines the extent to which the geographic features (both human and physical) of the Caribbean Islands have changed since prehistoric times, and presents a number of possible explanations for such change – including changing relationships between human activity and the “natural” world.  Following a brief but intensive review of our understanding of empirical change in the region, the course focuses on the methods used to gather and assess evidence; and critically analyzes the relevance of alternative theories of change.

 

Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed including AP/GEOG 1400 6.00, AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00. AP/GEOG 2020 6.00 is recommended.

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 4020 3.00.

Format: Three seminar hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

 


AP/GEOG 4040 6.00 - URBAN HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

                                                                                 

A course which examines the historical geography of cities, particularly those of 19th-century North America. The major focus of attention is the role of certain economic and cultural factors in the development of spatial arrangements within and among cities.

 

Expanded Description:  This course has three main components.  During the first term attention focuses on the cultural and social geography of nineteenth century cities in Britain, the United States and Canada, including Victorian Toronto.  Processes and spatial patterns associated with such variables as social class, ethnicity, and race are discussed.  The second main emphasis is on the evolution of the North American urban system, especially during the nineteenth century.  The third theme is the urban built environment, including town planning.  In each case both theoretical and substantive issues are addressed.

 

Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed and one of AP/GEOG 1410 6.00, AP/HIST 2600 6.00.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4040 6.00.

Format: Three lecture hours per week.

Required Reading: Course reading kit.

Assignments: Three papers and a final exam.

Instructor:  To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 4050 3.00 - NATURE, NEOLIBERALISM AND POLITICAL ECOLOGY

 NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This seminar explores complementary scholarship on 'first world' political ecology and the commodification of nature in order to critically explore issues of environmental management and resource conflict. It will draw on case studies about rural and urban North American environments.

 

Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed including AP/GEOG 3050 3.00 or permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 4050 3.00

Format:  To be announced.

Required Reading:  To be announced.

Assignments:  To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 4051 3.00 - COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT –

NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course applies a political ecological approach to the understanding of nature-society relationships. Using case studies from Asia, Africa and the America, the course examines the everyday realities of people and landscapes affected by environmental change, conflict and conversation.

 

Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed and AP/GEOG 3050 3.00 or permission of the instructor.

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 4051 3.00, AS/GEOG 3051 3.00

Format: Three lecture hours per week.

Required Reading:  To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.

 

 

AP/GEOG 4060 3.00 - WOMEN IN NORTH AMERICA: HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHIES OF GENDER AND SEXUALITY

NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course explores the changing geographies of women in Canada and the United States over the past three centuries, focusing on the historical and spatial construction of gender.

 

Expanded Description:  A theoretical and substantive exploration of the changing geographies of women in Canada and the United States over the past three centuries.  The course has three principal themes: the historical and spatial production of the concept of gender and gender inequality; the multiple meanings of women's spaces and places, and the impact of changes to those geographies; and a comparison of the experiences of women in Canada with those in the United States. The approach of the class is interdisciplinary.

 

Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed.

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 4060 3.00

Format: Three seminar hours per week.

Required Reading: Course reading kit; Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own.

Assignments:  Short essay, oral history project, original research paper, and class participation.

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 4090 3.00 - URBAN IDENTITIES: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON RACE, ETHNICITY, CLASS AND GENDER IN CANADIAN AND AMERICAN CITIES

 

This course considers the historical and spatial construction of racial, ethnic, gender and class identities in the broader context of urban development in Canada and the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries.

 

Expanded Description:  A consideration of the historical and spatial construction of racial, ethnic, gender and class identities, and the relationships among them, in the broader context of urban development in Canada and the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. Emphasis is on the urban nature of these identities and the production of communities along these lines. Selected topics range from riots to suburbs to AIDS.

 

Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed and one of: AP/GEOG 2220 6.00 or AP/GEOG 4040 6.00 or AP/GEOG 4170 3.00 or AP/GL/WMST 3505 3.00 or AP/SOSC 2710 9.00 or AP/SOSC 3760 6.00 or AP/SOCI 3830 6.00 or AP/SOCI 4055 6.00 or AP/SOCI 4120 6.00, or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 4090 3.00, AS/HIST 4050F 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/HIST 4083 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2005-2006).

Format: Three seminar hours per week.

Required Reading: Course kit

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: T. Sturm

 


AP/GEOG 4095 3.00 - ABORIGINAL; SPACE AND THE CITY: NORTH AMERICAN URBANIZATION AND ABORIGINAL PEOPLE, 1890-1980 NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course considers the historical construction of Aboriginal space in Canada and the US and its relationship to cities, from early colonization to the present.

 

Expanded Description:  The interdisciplinary course explores the historical construction of Aboriginal space in Canada and US, and its relationship to cities. It does so as a cross-border study, examining this process in both Canada and the US, thereby viewing the border as part of this colonial mapping of space in North America. Canada and the United States are predominantly urban nations, and have been since the early part of the century. In contrast, Aboriginal people have remained predominantly rural, tied to reservation lands. This course explores the way in which this difference was imagined, as well as the impact this spatial arrangement had on Aboriginal economies, politics, and identity. It also draws attention to the various ways in which Aboriginal people have responded to this process. An interdisciplinary course, it draws on Geography, History and Native Studies, among others.

 

Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4095 3.00.

Format: Three Seminar hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: Book review (15%), research proposal and bibliography (10%), original research paper (35%), in-class presentation (15%), and class participation (25%)

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 4130 3.00 - PLANNING SUBURBS - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

From garden suburbs to post-war inner- and outer-suburbs, from New Urbanist communities to edge cities, technoburbs, and exurbs, this course critically considers the planning of suburban built form and the suburbanization process in historical perspective. Consideration is given to the mechanisms and the challenges of managing suburban growth, and to the complex socio-cultural geographies and values that shape the suburbs and the suburban way of life. Attention is directed to issues of gender, racialized poverty, unemployment, infrastructural inadequacy, sprawl, and sustainability, and an effort is made to envision alternative futures.

 

Course credit exclusion: AK/GEOG 4130 6.00.

Format: Three seminar hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 4150 3.00 - FOODSCAPES AND AGRI-SCAPES: GEOGRAPHICAL PERSPECTIVES –

NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

The course explores the landscapes and scales of food and agriculture. Questions include: Can we change ourselves and the world through what we eat? Why do we still have world hunger? Who really controls how food is produced and consumed? Emphasis is given to food and agricultural geographies in the global south.

 

Pre-requisites: 84 credits completed.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Format: Three seminar hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: Reading reactions 15%, research assignments 70%, and participation 15%

Instructor: To be announced.

 


AP/GEOG 4170 3.00 - GEOGRAPHIC PERSPECTIVES ON IMMIGRATION, ETHNICITY AND RACE IN MODERN CITIES

 

This course first discusses a number of conceptual issues concerning the residential segregation of ethnic and racial groups. The course then considers several case examples that exemplify the varied experiences of ethnic and racial groups in modern cities.

 

Expanded Description:  This course is divided into two major sections.  In the first section we discuss contemporary migration trends and then focus on the settlement patterns of immigrants in major urban centres and immigrant experiences in local labor and housing markets.  Topics include international population movements, Canadian immigration policies and trends, patterns of segregation, transnational migration, and the reasons for and consequences of segregation.  In the second section we consider how geographies of housing and labour markets are linked and the consequences of labour market segmentation. The focus is primarily on immigrant flows in the post World War Two period.  Examples are drawn from a variety of cities and cultural contexts but particular stress is placed on the Canadian experience and especially immigrant settlement in the Toronto area.

 

Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed, including AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or written permission of the Instructor. Third-year Honours students with 78 credits completed who are also taking summer courses may enrol.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4170 3.00.

Format: Lectures and discussion periods.

Required Reading:  A course reading kit must be purchased.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: V. Preston

 

AP/SC/GEOG 4180 3.00 - LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF ECOLOGICAL MATERIALS

 

This course introduces students to a comprehensive range of laboratory techniques for the analysis of plant, soil and water samples. Laboratory sessions and projects provide students with experience in analytical procedures and the operation of major items of laboratory equipment.

 

Prerequisite: Six credits in physical geography at the 3000 or 4000 level or ES/ENVS 2410 3.00 or ES/ENVS 2420 3.00 or LE/EATS 1010 3.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4180 3.00.

Format:  Four scheduled lecture/laboratory hours, three additional laboratory hours. One term.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor:  S. Tank

 

AP/GEOG 4190 3.00 - GEOGRAPHIES OF THE ETHNIC ECONOMY

 

This course examines how location helps, hinders, or shapes ethnic economies; how various socio-cultural, economic-politico, institutional, and transnational spaces shape ethnic economies; how ethnic economies and other geographically identifiable phenomenon, such as residential segregation or institutional distributions, are related; and how ethnic economies shape the urban landscape.

 

Prerequisites: 84 credits completed; at least one of AS/GEOG 2100 6.00, AP/GEOG 2105 3.0, AP/GEOG 2220 6.00, AP/GEOG 3140 3.00 or permission of instructor.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4190 3.00.

Format:  Lectures and seminars/discussions.

Required Reading: A course kit must be purchased.

Assignments: Participation/seminar discussion (30%); reaction memos (30%); and term paper (40%).

Instructor:  M.J. Kwak

 


AP/SC GEOG 4200 3.00 - WATER QUALITY AND STREAM ECOSYSTEMS - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

The course focuses on selected aspects of river water quality, including hillslope hydrology and the transport of pollutants, the impacts of human activities on water chemistry, nutrient transformations within stream ecosystems, and the effects of water quality on stream biological communities.

 

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00, ES/ENVS 2410 3.00, or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00.

Course credit exclusions: AS/SC/GEOG 4200 3.00

Format:  Two lecture hours weekly, two lab hours every other week

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor:  S. Tank

 

AP/SC/GEOG 4205 3.00 - CLIMATOLOGY OF HIGH LATITUDES

 

A study of the processes of energy and moisture exchanges in polar regions with emphasis on the Canadian north. Topics include atmospheric and oceanic transport of energy, surface microclimate and the sensitivity of high latitude environments to climate change.

 

Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including AP/SC/GEOG 2400 6.00 or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusion: AS/SC/GEOG 4205 3.00.

Format:  Three lecture hours. One term.

Required Reading:  On reserve in GRC (S403 Ross)

Assignments: Four laboratory exercises 40%, term paper 30%, seminar presentation 30%

Instructor:  R. Bello

 

AP/SC GEOG 4210 3.00 – HYDROMETEOROLOGY - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

A study of the relationship between the atmosphere and the hydrosphere with the emphasis on the process of evaporation. The course includes an in-depth review of evaporation models and the instrumentation necessary for data acquisition.

 

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 2400 6.00.

Course credit exclusions: AS/SC/GEOG 4210 3.00. 

Format: Three lecture hours per week, one full-day laboratory session. One term.

Required Reading:  To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.

  


AP/SC/GEOG 4215 3.00 - ECOLOGICAL CLIMATOLOGY - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

The field of Ecological Climatology provides an interdisciplinary framework for understanding how terrestrial ecosystems function in relation to climate systems.  It examines the physical, chemical and biological processes by which landscapes affect and are affected by climate.  The central theme is that ecosystems, through their cycling of energy, water, chemical elements and race gases are important determinants of climate.  The coupling between climate and vegetation is seen at spatial scales from the leaf to biomes and at timescales from seconds to millennia.  Both natural vegetation dynamics and human induced land-use changes are mechanism of climate change.  The course combines a theoretical understanding of ecological climatology with applied experimentation to reinforce the principals involved.

 

Prerequisites: AP/SC GEOG 2400 6.00; and either AP/SC GEOG 2500 3.00  or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00; and either AP/SC GEOG 2420 3.00 Ior  SC/BIOL 2060 3.00 or permission of the Instructor. 

Course credit exclusion: None.

Format:  Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week

Required Reading:  To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor:  R. Bello

 

AP/GEOG 4220 3.00 - GEOGRAPHIES OF INDUSTRY: NEOLIBERAL ERA

NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course draws on contemporary institutional approaches and theories of regulation to interpret trends in industrial production and location in the current neoliberal age. Emphasis is put on concepts of: restructuring; the evolution of post-Fordist systems of production; new regional and global divisions of labour; neo-artisanal production; the mergence of new industrial spaces; cultural production; resource economies; and the social economy.

 

Expanded Description:  This course examines the new geographies of industry that have emerged in the neoliberal age. An examination of changes in modes of production, and then of changes in the regulatory, institutional and cultural environment provides the base for interpreting a series of contemporary changes including: industrial restructuring; flexible, lean, neo-artisanal and other post-Fordist systems of production; various new divisions of labor; the emergence of new industrial spaces and the supply chains that them; the new resource economy in peripheral regions; learning regions, technopoles and hi-tech clusters; new global production arrangements; and the survival of informal work.

 

Prerequisites: 72 credits passed, including one of AP/ECON 1010 3.00, AP/ECON 3230 3.00, AP/GEOG 2100 6.00 (AP/GEOG 2105 3.00), AP/GEOG 2220 6.00, or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4220 3.00.

Format: Three seminar hours per week.

Required Reading: Course pack plus online electronic readings.

Assignments: Two essays (each 1,500 words) (50%); final exam (40%); participation (10%).

 Instructor: To be announced.

 

 

AP/GEOG 4240 3.00 - THE PLANNING OF URBAN PUBLIC FACILITIES

 

Theoretical and practical problems concerning the supply and distribution of public goods and services in urban areas.

 

Expanded Description:  Considerable interest is shown by academics, planners, politicians and the public in the provision of public goods and services to urban dwellers. These goods and services include: emergency services, social services, utilities, recreation, leisure, transportation and communications.  Interest ranges from theoretical treatment of abstract optimization problems to practical issues of conflict resolution.  All recognize that the problem of defining and searching for an ideal level of supply and style of distribution is complex because multiple criteria and goals must be considered.  Not infrequently many individuals and groups are involved in the determination of the criteria and goals.  The search process (involving collection of information) may be lengthy and costly, opinions and preferences may shift during the study, and conflicts can arise. Problems of a theoretical and practical nature concerning the production, consumption and distribution of public goods and services in urban areas will be examined using literature from geography, economics, political science, planning and operations research.  Empirical examples for cities in North America will be used. 

 

Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AP/SOSC 2710 9.00 or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4240 3.00.

Format:  Three lecture hours weekly.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 4250 3.0 - IMAGINED LANDSCAPES

 

This course examines the representation of landscapes in fictional literature, film, visual arts and music. Emphasis is placed on the power, purpose and problems of metaphor, symbolism and representation.

 

Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4250 3.00.

Format:  Three lecture hours weekly.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor:  B. Erickson

 


AP/GEOG 4260 3.00 - APPLIED TRANSPORTATION GEOGRAPHY -   NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014                     

 

This course focuses on urban transportation planning and policy analysis as an area of research. It discusses the theoretical principles governing movement and planning, and analytically examines approaches to policy problems.

 

Expanded Description:  This course focuses on urban transportation planning and policy analysis.  The major objective is to make students aware that:

 

 

Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed, including one of AP/GEOG 2100 6.00 (AP/GEOG 2105 3.00), AP/GEOG 2220 6.00.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4260 3.00.

Format: Lectures and discussions/seminars.

Required Reading: A course reading kit must be purchased.

Assignments:  Two written assignments (50%); term test (20%); and participation/seminar discussion (30%).

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 4280 3.00 - IMAGINING TORONTO:  LITERARY GEOGRAPHIES OF A CITY

NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course explores intersections of literature and place in the Toronto region, exposing students to critical and imaginative works on place, culture, and representation. Close readings of a wide selection of Toronto-based literature are paired with critical scholarly works interrogating how places are invented, (re)presented, and (re)produced.

 

Prerequisite: At least 84 credits successfully completed or permission of the instructor.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4280 3.00.

Format: Three seminar hours per week.

Required Reading: Course kit.

Assignments: Four short pieces 40%, essay 40%, and participation 20%.

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/SC/GEOG 4290 3.00 - DIRECTED READING

 

This course may be used for individualized study, in which case the student requires permission from a faculty member who agrees to supervise the program of directed reading and from the Chair of the department.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4290 3.00.

 

Note: See the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies section of the Undergraduate Programs Calendar for Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies regulations on Independent Reading Courses.

 

Only topics in physical geography are eligible for Science (SC) credit.

Application Process:  An application form is available in the Department of Geography Undergraduate Program Office, N430 Ross.

 

Application Deadline:          

 

March 31 (Summer Term)

 

AP/SC/GEOG 4290 6.00 - DIRECTED READING

 

This course may be used for individualized study, in which case the student requires permission from a faculty member who agrees to supervise the program of directed reading and from the Chair of the department.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4290 6.00.

 

Note: See the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies section of the Undergraduate Programs Calendar for Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies regulations on Independent Reading Courses.

 

Only topics in physical geography are eligible for Science (SC) credit.

 

Application Process:  An application form is available in the Geography Main Office, N430 Ross.

 

Application Deadline:  June 30

 

AP/SC/GEOG 4310 3.00 - DYNAMICS OF SNOW AND ICE    

 

This course examines the formation, distribution, structure and degradation of snow, as well as lake, river and sea ice.

 

Expanded Description:  In this course the occurrence and distribution, formation and degradation and the environmental consequences of snow, lake, river and sea ice are examined.  Additional components of the cryosphere such as massive ice, ground ice and glaciers will be discussed.  Physical processes and fieldwork are emphasized in the course.

 

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 2400 6.00.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4310 3.00.

Format: Two lecture hours and three lab hours every week. One term.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: K.L. Young

 

AP/SC/GEOG 4340 3.00 - GEOINFORMATICS: GIS II

 

Advanced course in geographic information systems (GIS), oriented around raster structures. Computer graphics for mapping introduced and work undertaken on finely divided surfaces. GIS considers both practical and theoretical questions of interpretation. Macintosh computers and raster-based software used for hands-on focus.

 

Expanded Description:  Advanced course in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), will cover: the fundamental concepts of spatial data management and spatial data models involved in modern GIS, file structures and management with ArcCatalog, GIS database construction and georeferencing with ArcScan, vector and raster-based spatial analysis and spatial decision support techniques. This course will present students with the fundamental concepts and advanced techniques of ArcGIS. It will also prepare students for applying GIS-based techniques to hand spatial data in various fields. ArcGIS and various extensions will be used for hands-on exercises. Application examples include site selection, predictive mapping, watershed-based hydrological modeling, stream network analysis, and environmental planning.

 

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 3180 3.00, AP/SC GEOG 3340 3.00.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4340 3.00.

Format: Two lecture hours, and two laboratory hours per week.  One term

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: Q. Cheng

 

AP/GEOG 4380 3.00 - URBAN SOCIAL POLICY

 

A critical examination of the links between urban social problems and state policies. The course studies how policy makers, planners and geographers understand and deal with social problems in the contemporary city and evaluates selected planning policies.

 

Expanded Description:  This course explores the linkages among the geographies of inequalities, state policies and civil society.  We will review a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches that uncover the contested meaning of social policy and note its variations over time and space.  Some questions of concern relate to: how are marginal groups discriminated in the city?  Is the urban form and design of cities exclusionary in nature?  How do societies provide for social welfare that is in need of an equitable, educated, healthy and socially cohesive citizenry?  The focus will be on urban areas and particular emphasis is placed on the Canadian experience, although some examples are drawn from other regions of the world. 

 

Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed, including one of AP/GEOG 1000 6.00, AP/GEOG 1410 6.00, and at least six additional credits in human geography at the 2000 or 3000 level.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4380 3.00.

Format: Two lecture hours followed by one seminar hour.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments:  To be announced.

Instructor:  M.J. Kwak

 

AP/GEOG  4395 3.00 - ASIA PACIFIC DEVELOPMENT: GEOGRAPHICAL PERSPECTIVES 

 

This course examines socio-economic development in the Asian-Pacific region from a Canadian prospective. In particular, the course focuses on geographical flows of migration, trade, investment and aid between Canada and Asia, and corresponding social, political and economic changes in Asian societies.

 

Expanded Description:  The rapid transformation of societies in East and Southeast Asia represents one of the most important shifts in the geographical structure of the global economy in recent decades.  Development in the countries of the Asia-Pacific region is, however, the product of global linkages as well as internal socio-economic and political change.  This course explores such linkages and focuses upon those that integrate and implicate Canada in the socio-economic development of the region.  In particular, the course examines the geographical flow of migration, trade, investment, and aid between Asia and Canada, and relates these flows to social and economic change in Asian societies.  Topics to be covered will include: approaches to understanding Pacific Asian development; the construction of Pacific regionalism; development and restructuring processes in East and Southeast Asian societies; the social and economic dimensions of Canadian aid and human rights advocacy in Asia.  Students will have opportunities to conduct studies of the Asian communities that have emerged in Toronto, and their place of origin.

 

Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusions:  AS/GEOG 4395 3.00.

Format: Two lecture hours and one tutorial hour per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: M.J. Kwak

 


AP/SC/GEOG 4400 3.00 - PHYSICAL HYDROLOGY AND WATER RESOURCES

 

An intermediate course in the physical principles of hydrological and water resource systems. Topics to be discussed include groundwater storage and flow, deterministic hydrological models and physical hydrological aspects of current water resource problems.

 

Expanded Description:  The course examines the physical principles of hydrological and water resource systems.  Emphasis is placed on developing a conceptual understanding of:

 

 

Prerequisite: AP/SC/GEOG 2400 6.00.

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 4400 3.00 

Format: Two lecture hours, two laboratory hours. One term.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments:  To be announced.

Instructor: K.L. Young

 

AP/SC/GEOG 4410 3.00 - DESERT ECOSYSTEMS

 

This course focuses on the vegetation of the desert, species adaptations to high temperature and aridity and the interactions between organisms, and between plants and their environment.

 

Prerequisites: One of: AP/GEOG 1400 6.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 6.00.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4410 3.00.

Format: To be announced.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments:  To be announced.

Instructor: T. Drezner

 

 AP/SC/GEOG 4420 3.00 - PROJECT EXPERIENCE IN GEOGRAPHYNOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course enables Honours students to apply work experience in geography to their degree program. It provides students an opportunity to put their classroom learning into practice in a non-academic environment. The objective is to encourage students to put geographic skills to work in the addressing of real world problems.

 

Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor. Students must be registered in an Honours Geography Program and must have successfully completed at least 84 credits, including AP/SC/GEOG 3420 3.00.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4420 3.00.

Format: To be announced.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments:  To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

 


AP/SC/GEOG 4440 3.00 – Geoinformatics: Remote Sensing II

                                                                                                                  

Sophisticated methods and techniques for collecting, processing and analyzing remote sensing data are examined. Special topics include image enhancement techniques (e.g. texture transforms), non-traditional image classification and data integration for incorporation of remote sensing data products into geographic information systems (GIS).

 

Expanded Description:  This course aims to provide every student with a working knowledge of sophisticated methods and techniques for collecting, processing and analyzing remote sensing data along with the theories and practices of undertaking remote sensing projects.  Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on image processing, image analysis, image classification, and data integration. The goal is to apply remote sensing in geographical analysis and environmental monitoring. This course is composed of lectures, laboratories, individual and group analysis, a term paper, and student presentations.

 

Cross-listed: ES/ENVS 4521 3.00

Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 3440 3.00 or ES/ENVS 3521 3.00 or LE/EATS 4220 3.00 or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4440 3.00.

Format: Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.  Supplementary articles will be provided.

Assignments: Two assignments 25%, weekly lab exercises 5%, group presentation 10%, term paper 45%, and test 15%.

Instructor: T. Remmel

 

AP/SC/GEOG 4500 3.00 - NORTHERN FOREST ENVIRONMENTS - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

An examination of the northern forested regions of Canada: Coastal, Subalpine, Montane, Columbian, Boreal, Great Lakes-St. Lawrence and Acadian Forests. Various aspects of each region are explored, including vegetation composition and development, environmental conditions and major disturbance regimes.

 

Prerequisites: 84 credits successfully completed, including AP/SC/GEOG 2420 3.00, and AP/SC/GEOG 2500 3.00 or SC/BIOL 2050 4.00 or permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4500 3.00.

Format:  Two lecture hours, two laboratory hours. One term.

Required Reading:  To be announced.

Assignments:  To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.

 


AP/GEOG 4520 3.00 - RESEARCH DESIGN AND FIELD STUDIES IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

 

The course is an introduction to research design and methodology in human geography. The course integrates on-campus preparation and report writing with off-campus fieldwork during which data collection and preliminary analysis are carried out. The fieldwork relates to a geographic problem offering scope for the special interests of students in various aspects of geography.

 

Prerequisites: Students must be registered as Honours majors in geography and must have successfully completed 54 credits, including AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00 or AP/GEOG 2510 6.00; AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00; AP/GEOG 2500 6.00; AP/SC/GEOG 2420 3.00; orAP/SC GEOG 3740; or permission of the Department.

Course credit exclusions: AK/MATH 3330 3.00, AS/SC/GEOG 3390B 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2002-2003), AS/GEOG 3420 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2007-2008), AS/GEOG 4520 3.00 and AS/SC/GEOG 4540 3.00.

Format: A combination of lectures, workshops, seminars and field trip.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: R. Anderson (W), B. Erickson(W), L. Lo (F),

 

**ADDITIONAL FEES MAY BE INCURRED TO COVER THE EXPENSE OF TRANSPORTATION AND ACCOMMODATION

FOR OUT-OF-TOWN FIELD TRIPS.**  PLEASE CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM OFFICE (N430 ROSS) FOR ADDITIONAL DETAILS.

 

AP/SC/GEOG 4541 3.00 - ADVANCED FIELD STUDIES IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY

 

This course applies geographic principles and field techniques to problems in physical geography during a field trip of at least one weeks duration to a location outside of Ontario.

 

Prerequisites: AP/GEOG 1400 6.00, AP/GEOG 2420 3.00.  **AP/GEOG 3540 3.00 recommended**

 

Priority will be given to Geography Honours and Environmental Science students having already completed 84 credits.

 

Course credit exclusions: None.

Format: To be announced.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments:  To be announced.

Instructor:  R. Bello

 

AP/SC/GEOG 4600 3.00 - RIVERS:  ENVIRONMENT AND PROCESS - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course provides fundamental knowledge of river mechanics and related environmental conditions. It provides an integration of physical, environmental and spatial aspects of river behaviour. The course involves the application of principles of hydrology, geomorphology, sedimentology and fluid mechanics.

 

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4600 3.00.

Format: To be announced.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments:  To be announced.

Instructor:  To be announced.


AP/GEOG 4605 3.00 - THE GREATER TORONTO AREA – A GEOGRAPHICAL PERSPECTIVE

 

This course examines the processes and issues of urban growth and change in the Greater Toronto Area, including the forces shaping growth, the consequences of growth, and planning initiatives/proposals for managing growth.

 

Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed or permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4605 3.00.

Format: Three seminar hours per week

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 4610 3.00 - GEOPOLITICS

 

This course examines the geographic basis of the political evolution of the nation-state, from its emergence in Western Europe to its varied diffusions throughout the world. It explores notions of turf and territory, nationalism and the growth of geopolitical awareness.

 

Expanded Description:  This course examines how concepts and practices of turf, territory, nationalism and the nation-state have come to order the world and dominate its politics. A central focus of the course is on the ‘state’, and how it has altered its geographical expression over the past half-millennium. This focus will be used to explore the structure and evolution of the geopolitical map of the world into the transnational, and perhaps postnational, 21st century.

 

Prerequisites: At least 72 credits successfully completed, including AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4610 3.00.

Format: Three hours per week of combined lecture and discussion.

Required Reading: O'Tuathail et al., The Geopolitics Reader. Other readings will be available on reserve.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: T. Sturm

 

AP/GEOG 4700 3.00 - THE CRITICAL GEOGRAPHIES OF EDUCATION

 

This course explores the complex interactions between education, space and civil society. Particular emphasis is placed on the effects of policy restructuring on the geographies of educational landscapes. Theoretical and empirical studies are used to explore, analyze and critically engage in current debates.

 

Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed including one of AP/GEOG 1410 6.0, AP/GEOG 1000 6.0 or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4700 3.00.

Format: Three seminar hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: Assignment 1 (15%); Assignment 2 (15%); Presentation (20%); Class Participation (20%); Final Research Paper (30%).

Instructor: R. Basu

 


AP/GEOG 4750 3.00 - GEOGRAPHY OF DISABILITIES

 

This course explores the inter-relationships between disability, space and environment. It investigates the ways in which these have been treated in the social science literature, examines both individual and collective experiences, explores aspects of planning and design, especially in cities, and seeks paths towards an enabling geography.

 

Prerequisites: AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00, and 72 credits successfully completed or permission of instructor.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4750 3.00.

Format: Three seminar hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: Two tests 15% each, short assignment 15%, major paper 40%, participation 15%

Instructor:  J. Radford

 

AP/GEOG 4800 3.00 - GEOGRAPHIES OF ORGANIZED LABOUR - NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course explores the contemporary struggles of workers and their institutions to remain relevant actors in the making of economic landscapes. The central theme is the dynamic and multi-scalar nature of organized labour's response to aggressive and increasingly mobile capital.

 

Expanded Description:  Geographies of Organized Labour examines the struggles of workers and their institutions to remain relevant actors in the shaping of contemporary economic landscapes. The focus of the course is largely on the experience of workers and unions in Canada, the US, Britain and Australia.  The first part of the course establishes the theoretical foundations for understanding the attack on organized labour by capital and neo-liberal states from a geographical perspective.  The current spatial mismatch between increasingly global capital and ‘local’ organized labour will be addressed.  The bulk of the course will focus on workers’ concerted efforts to regulate capital and shape economic production to its advantage through organizing (and, in many cases, reorganizing) at multiple scales, from the home and the worksite to the formation of international networks. The course will examine new spatial formations from community unionism and Living Wage Campaigns to Global Unionism.  At the completion of the course students will appreciate the multi-scalar actions of organized labour to remain relevant in the 21st century.

 

Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 4800 3.00.

Format: Three seminar hours per week

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: To be announced.

Instructor: To be announced.

 

AP/GEOG 4850 3.00 - THE STATE, CIVIL SOCIETY AND SPACES OF DEVELOPMENT

NOT OFFERED FW2013-2014

 

This course deals with theoretical and empirical understandings of the ways in which the state and civil society organizations co-determine the geography of development.

 

Prerequisites: 72 credits successfully completed, including one of AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AP/GEOG 2100 3.00 or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusion:  AS/GEOG 4850 3.00.

Format: Three seminar hours per week.

Required Reading: To be announced.

Assignments: Participation 20%, Mid-term 25%, Research Paper 25%, Take-home exam 30%

Instructor: To be announced.


AP/GEOG 4880 3.00 - SPACES OF CONFLICT, VIOLENCE, AND POWER

 

This course examines the spatial aspects of conflict, violence, and power across various scales from the body to the transnational arena. Topics include territory and state violence, terrorism, forced migration, environmental conflict, and the spatial dimensions of resisting violence.

 

Expanded Description:  In this course we will examine the spatial dimensions of conflict, violence, and power across various scales from the body to the nation-state and transnational arena. We begin with the premise that space is not simply the static backdrop upon which conflict unfolds and power relations play out. We will examine, rather, how conflict, violence, and power relations emerge from particular spatial relations such as territorial boundaries and access to environmental resources. We will investigate, moreover, how conflict, violence, and power relations reshape spaces, from the redrawing of territorial boundaries to the emergence of warscapes, prisons, and traumatized bodies. Building from this, we will investigate the ways in which goods, capital, and people move across—as well as create—spaces of conflict by looking at forced migration and displacement and extractive economies such as those of diamonds and oil.  Ultimately, by bringing space, violence, and power into conversation, we will attempt to unearth and understand some of the root causes of conflict and violence in the modern world and what might be done to prevent and address them.

 

Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed.

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 4880 3.00.

Format:   Three hours per week; seminar/discussion.                    

Required Reading: Course kit

Assignments:  Research paper 40%, presentation 10%, six short reading commentaries 25%, and participation 25%

Instructor:  U. Best

 

AP/GEOG 4900 3.00 - PUBLIC SPACE

 

This course examines the existence, genealogies, qualities, significance, and use of public space, as well as past and emergent challenges and threats to public space.

 

Expanded Description:  This course examines the ways in which the meaning and the purpose of public space have been (re)defined and (re)shaped in contemporary Western cities. We will critically reflect on the implications of the private production of a traditionally public amenity and on the implications of the increase in consumption, corporate branding, security, and surveillance in public space. Through discussion we will debate the qualities, significance, and use of public space in order to determine whose space is public space.  Artists working with public space as a medium are at the forefront of many of the themes addressed in the course and provide compelling and playful examples to illustrate course material

 

Prerequisite:  72 credits successfully completed.

Course credit exclusions:  AS/GEOG 4900 3.00

Format:  Three seminar hours per week.

Required reading:  PDF articles available on-line on Moodle.

Assignments:  Participation 20%; on-line journal entries 20%; research paper 30%; and research paper 30%

Instructor:  A. Bain