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1000 Level Courses

ARB 1000 6.0 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN STANDARD ARABIC

This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Arabic and focuses on developing proficiency in reading, writing, listening and speaking the standard Arabic language. It begins with learning of the script and phonology, and works rapidly into vocabulary and grammar by using short sentences and moving into texts of different lengths and topics. By the end of this course, students are expected to be able to read and understand short texts of Arabic and translate them from Arabic into English, and vice versa.

PREREQUISITE: None; not open to native speakers of Arabic.

EVALUATION: Tests (written and oral), 30%; two longer term tests, 40%; assignments and quizzes, 10%; class participation, 20%.

TEXT: Photocopied material prepared by the instructor at cost; Eckehard Schulz et al. Standard Arabic: An Elementary-Intermediate Course, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000; : Al-Kitaab fii Tacallum al-cArabiyya: A Textbook for Arabic, Part I, by Brustad, Al-Batal & Al-Tonsi, Georgetown University Press, 1995; Hans Wehr. A Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic (any edition).

CH 1000 6.0 Elementary Modern Standard Chinese

This is an Introductory course for English speakers who have no knowledge of Chinese. Students are expected to learn to carry on simple everyday conversations in the national language and to read and write approximately 500 Chinese characters. Pattern drills are used primarily in addition to grammatical analysis. Note: Students whose native dialect is Cantonese are directed to AP/CH 3010 6.00.

Course credit exclusions: None.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/CH 1000 6.00.

CH 1010 6.0 Elementary Chinese for Advanced Beginners

This course presents three aspects of Modern Standard Chinese: pronunciation, grammar, and writing system. Lectures, classroom practice, audio tapes, and interactive computer programs. Pinyin (Chinese Romanization) is used in teaching approximately 500 characters by the end of the course. Note: This course prepares for entry into AP/CH 2000 6.00, AP/CH 2030 6.00, or with permission of the department, AP/CH 3000 6.00.

Course credit exclusion: AP/CH 1000 6.00.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/CH 1000 6.00 and AS/CH 2010 6.00.

GK 1000 6.0A ELEMENTARY CLASSICAL GREEK

FACULTY: AP

This course is designed for those who have little or no training in Classical Greek. In this course, students acquire the fundamentals of reading Classical Greek through practice with translation, vocabulary, grammar, syntax, composition, and pronunciation. At the end of this course, students are able to go on to AP/GK 2000 6.0, the second-year Classical Greek course at York University.

PREREQUISITE: None. No previous knowledge of the language is assumed. No one who has completed an upper-level university Classical Greek course may enroll in this course. No one may enroll in this course and an upper-level Classical Greek course simultaneously.

EVALUATION: Quizzes: 40%? Class work: 15%? Midterm examination 20%? Final examination 25%.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

HEB 1000 6.0A ELEMENTARY MODERN HEBREW

FACULTY: AP

This course is an introduction to Modern Hebrew designed only for students with no previous knowledge of Hebrew. Classes are communicative, with a focus on conversational skills. Students will learn the Hebrew alphabet and acquire basic vocabulary and an elementary grasp of Hebrew grammar. New vocabulary and grammatical structures are practiced through speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students will use computers for additional practice and review of vocabulary and grammar taught in class.

PREREQUISITE: None. Not normally open to anyone ever having studied Hebrew before either formally or informally. Departmental Course Entry Authorization slip required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT.

EVALUATION: Written assignments -20%; quizzes - 15%; first term test - 15%; oral presentation - 10%; class participation - 20%; final examination - 20%.

TEXTS: Chayat S., Israeli S., Kobliner H., Hebrew from Scratch (Part 1).

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

HND 1000 6.0 Elementary Hindi-Urdu

This course is an introduction to standard written and spoken Hindi-Urdu designed for students with no formal training in or knowledge of Hindi or Urdu. Introduction to both Hindi and Urdu vocabulary, but only the Hindi (Nagari) script is used.

Course credit exclusions: None.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HND 1000 6.00.

HUMA 1100 9.0A WORLD OF ANCIENT GREECE & ROME

FACULTY: AP

 

Note: Successful completion of this course fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

A study of the classical world with a view to understanding the origin and evolution of some of the literary, philosophical and political ideals of ancient Greece and Rome. Materials for this study will be drawn from Greek and Roman literature in translation, with illustration from the plastic arts.

COURSE DIRECTOR: S. Blake

RESERVED SPACES: All spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/HUMA 1710 6.00

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HUMA 1100 9.00, AK/HUMA 1710 6.00

 

HUMA 1105 9.0A MYTH & IMAGINATION IN ANCIENT GREECE & ROME

FACULTY: AP

Note: Successful completion of this course fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

The mythical narratives of the ancient Greeks and the Romans constitute a continuous tradition that extends from before the reach of history to the present day.  Myths survive in literary texts and visual art because their narratives have continued proved compelling and fascinating in different languages, historical eras, and social contexts (the myths of Odysseus, Heracles, and Oedipus are just a few examples).  Literature and art of all kinds have been inspired to retell and represent their stories, while the search for the meaning of mythic stories has informed and profoundly influenced a great range of intellectual disciplines including literary criticism, anthropology, and psychoanalysis.  In these ways, myths have and continue to exercise a fundamental influence on western culture and, in consequence, even today they maintain a certain cosy familiarity.  On the other hand, the historical contexts in which the Greeks and Romans told and retold these mythical narratives are to us in the twenty-first century culturally alien and unfamiliar.

The aim of the course is two-fold: insofar as Greek and Roman culture is fundamental to the development of western culture, students will achieve a deeper historical understanding of the latter; yet because the world of the Greeks and Romans is in many ways radically different to our own, students will develop the conceptual tools for comprehending another culture and so enhance their ability to understand and critique their own cultures.  The course is also one of the Foundations courses and as such is intended to provide students with a solid grounding for undergraduate study by cultivating generally applicable and transferable skills; these include the development of clear and logical academic writing, critical and analytical skills for reading and understanding texts, constructive participation in group discussion and debate (in tutorials), and basic methods and techniques of research.

COURSE DIRECTOR: D. Burke (Section A)

RESERVED SPACES: All spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 1105 9.00.

HUMA 1110 9.0A GREEK & BIBLICAL TRADITION

FACULTY: AP

Note: Successful completion of this course fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

 A study of early Mesopotamian, Greek, Jewish and Christian literature (1) to understand its original meanings and (2) to explore its relevance to our search for personal ethical norms, images of female and male, models of the just society and conceptions of transcendent reality. The course aims (3)  to teach students methods of literary criticism, textual interpretation, historical inquiry, conceptual analysis, and cross-cultural comparisons. ASSIGNMENTS: Four essays (25% each).  

 
 
 
 
 
REPRESENTATIVE READINGS: On-line editions are used. Myths from Mesopotamia; Tanakh (Bible); Hesiod, Plato; the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides; Pirke Avot: Jewish Ethics; Early Christian literature. 

              COURSE DIRECTOR: S. Ford 

 

RESERVED SPACES: All spaces are reserved for Year 01 students

 

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/HUMA 1710 6.00. 

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 1710 6.00, AS/HUMA 1110 9.00.

 

HUMA 1125 9.0A Civilization of Medieval and Renaissance Europe

 

Note: Successful completion of this course fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

 The course explores two stages in European civilization -- the Middle Ages and the Renaissance -- to which our present politics, religion, intellectual and artistic culture owe much.  We look for the themes, tensions, habits of thought, values and manias that link and distinguish these two eras.  The Middle Ages began when Rome collapsed (ca. 500) and shaded slowly into the Renaissance (1350-1630), just after the Black Death swept through Europe.  The Middle Ages were not "dark." Though turbulent and at first impoverished, they produced feudal kingdoms, gothic cathedrals, and brilliant logical philosophy.  In the first term we meet medieval hermits, saints, dragons, knights, crusaders, burghers, and assorted lovers, happy and unhappy. The Renaissance saw the beginnings of modernity emerge out of the medieval past. Great individual achievements blossomed in a world reshaped by commercial expansion, political consolidation and religious crisis. It was a time of cultural flux and growth, where novelty challenged tradition, and optimism vied with deep anxiety.  In the second term, we encounter poets, storytellers, philosophers, sly politicians, acute scientists, and, again, men and women of deep faith.  As a Foundations course, Humanities 1125 9.0 puts great stress on critical skills, and particularly on writing. ASSIGNMENTS: Short papers: 50%; Mid-term: 15%; Final: 25%; Participation: 10%. (subject to change) REPRESENTATIVE READINGS: Beowulf, The Letters of Abelard and Heloise, Abelard, History of his Calamities, The Song of Roland, Gottfried von Strassburg, Tristan, Dante, The Divine Comedy, Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, Saint Catherine of Siena, Selected Letters, Raimundo of Capua, The Life of Catherine of Siena, Benvenuto Cellini, Autobiography, Thomas More, Utopia, Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince, Montaigne, Essays, Shakespeare, The Tempest. (subject to change) COURSE DIRECTOR: T. Cohen RESERVED SPACES: All spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/HUMA 1800 6.00. 

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 1800 6.00, AS/HUMA 1120 9.00, AS/HUMA 1125 9.00 and AS/HUMA 1130 9.00.

 

HUMA 1300 9.0A CULTURES OF THE RESISTANCE IN THE AMERICAS

FACULTY: AP

NOTE: Successful completion of this course fulfils General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

This course addresses the ways in which diasporic Africans have responded to and resisted their enslaved and subordinated status in the Americas. Resistance is first addressed in relationship to slavery, but later in the course resistance is seen in a much broader context: in response to post-colonial and post-civil rights, and as an engagement of national, economic, cultural and social forces. Thus, resistance might be understood as a continuing legacy of black peoples' existence in the Americas. Resistance is, first, read in relationship to European domination in the Americas and, second, to national and other post-emancipation forms of domination which force us to think of resistance in increasingly more complex ways. The "anatomy of prejudices"-sexism, homophobia, class oppression, racism-come under scrutiny as the course attempts to articulate the libratory project. The course focuses, then, on the cultural experiences of African diasporic peoples, examining the issues raised through a close study of black cultures in the Caribbean, the United States and Canada. It critically engages the ways in which cultural practices and traditions have survived and been transformed in the context of black subordination. It addresses the aesthetic, religious and ethical practices that enable black people to survive and build "communities of resistance" and allow them both to carve out a space in the Americas they can call home and to contribute variously to the cultures of the region.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/HUMA 1300 9.0.

EVALUATION: Essay (15%), textual analysis (15%) research assignment (20%), oral report (15%), class participation (10%), final exam (25%). (subject to change)

TEXTS: Henry Louis Gates Jr, ed., The Classic Slave Narratives; Gloria Naylor, Mama Day; Earl Lovelace, The Dragon Can't Dance; Edwidge Danticat, Breath, Eyes, Memory; Course Kit of articles from selected journals and anthologies.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

HUMA 1400 9.0A Culture and Society in East Asia

Introduction to traditional East Asian civilization by examining daily life in 18th-century Peking and Edo (Tokyo), and their rural hinterland. Topics include the physical setting, social distinctions and occupations, arts and crafts, religion, literature and entertainment.

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit.

Course credit exclusions: None.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 1400 9.00.

HUMA 1710 6.0A ROOTS OF WESTERN CULTURE

FACULTY: AP

NOTE: Successful completion of this course fulfils General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

This course begins by considering the look back into such ancient times when stories were reworked and transmitted for generations through oral culture, and orienting students to the emerging cultural identities of the ancient Greek and ancient Hebrews. For example we will study the documentary hypothesis which suggests that the Hebrew Bible is a composite work from several sources, and we will consider how our knowledge of "the Greeks" is often based on scant physical remains, fragmentary literary sources dependent on second and third hand authors, and is always interpretative. Students will be introduced to many kinds of literature which emerged in the ancient period: epic poetry, lyric poetry, fables and parables, dramatic works, philosophical and medical treatises and historical prose. We will want to engage in close readings of primary texts with a view to understanding key themes and ideas, historical, political, and social contexts, and religious beliefs and practices. Thus, along the way, we might consider parallels to, and influences from, even more ancient civilizations; highlight certain Greek gods and goddess and their festivals; and, consider the social status of women, or cultural differences between the Spartans and Athenians. We will always want to engage with the texts critically which will involve examining the perspectives of ancient authors, the use of art and literature for ideological ends, as well as our own assumptions about the past. In addition to excerpts from the Old and New Testament, we will engage with a number of Greek and Roman authors which will include many of the following: Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Aesop, Aeschylus, Aristophanes, Pythagoras, Plato, Herodotus, Thucydides, Hippocrates, Livy, Virgil, Lucretius, Epicurus, Epictetus, Apuleius and Ovid. It was in the climate of the Roman world that the two major stands of Western thought, the Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian, came together. After having spent some time on Archaic and Classical Greek writers, we will examine the adoption of Greek culture by the Romans who gave it their own personality. We will end the course with a look at the early Christian authors as they attempted to distinguish themselves both from the Law of the Jews and Greco-Roman polytheism.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/HUMA 1110 9.0. Prior to Fall 2009: AK/HUMA 1710 6.0, AS/HUMA 1110 9.0.

EVALUATIONS: Two essays (1500 words): each worth 15%; Two tests: each worth 15%; Weekly Response papers: 30%; Two tutorial presentations: 10%

TEXTS: There will be two Course kits, one for each term. A couple of inexpensive paperbacks, titles yet to be determined.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Carol Bigwood

HUMA 1850 6.0A THE BIBLE & MODERN CONTEXTS

FACULTY: AP

NOTE: Successful completion of this course fulfils General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

The course examines selected biblical texts, their social and historical contexts, and selected current issues such as the goddess, role of women in religion, social critique, sexual ethics, spirituality and biblical interpretation.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: Prior to Fall 2009: AK/HUMA 1850 6.0.

TIME: Tuesday 19:00-22:00

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

HUMA 1860 6.0A THE NATURE OF RELIGION

FACULTY: AP

NOTE: Successful completion of this course fulfils General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

Explores the nature of religious faith, religious language (myth and symbol) and clusters of religious beliefs through an examination of the primary texts of several major world religions. Methodologies for the study of religion will also be examined.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/HUMA 2800 9.0, AP/SOSC 2600 9.0. Prior to Fall 2009: AK/HUMA 1860 6.0, AS/HUMA 2800 9.0, AS/SOSC 2600 9.0.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

HUMA 1870 6.0A THE BIBLE & THE ARTS

FACULTY: AP

NOTE: Successful completion of this course fulfils General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

This course looks at selected passages from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and their interpretative reflection in the western artistic tradition, including pictorial/representational art, music, literature, and cinema. The Hebrew Bible/Old Testament is one of the most influential works of western literature. Over the course of the centuries it has been the subject of myriad interpretations. In addition to traditional sectarian and scholarly readings, the text has served as the inspiration for countless artistic creations, ranging from novels, plays, short stories, paintings, and sculptures, to operas, oratorios, movies, and television shows (including The Simpsons!). Each one of these representations and retellings of these time-worn tales is also an interpretation, reflecting the specific perspective of the author/creator. In this course, we will read selected biblical stories and compare them to selected examples of their re-imagined and reinterpreted versions. The aims of the course are to teach first-year students (1) how to read texts in their broadest sense, (2) how to interpret texts, (3) how to compare differing versions of the same tale/tradition, (4) how to identify and comprehend the ideology and/or theology underlying a text, (5) how to read different types of texts, and (6) how to appreciate various types of artistic creations whose study and enjoyment may be new to them. In addition, the wide range of artistic creations examined in this course serves to introduce students to the temporal and genre-based wealth of the western cultural tradition.

EVALUATION: 10% Participation grade (based on attendance and participation in tutorial sections); 20% First term paper; 20% Second term paper; 20% Mid-year exam; 30% Final exam. (subject to change)

TEXTS: Literature: Stefan Heym, The King David Report; Zora Neale Hurston, Moses, Man of the Mountain; Sigmund Freud, Moses and Monotheism; Joseph Heller, God Knows; John Milton, Paradise Lost & Samson Agonistes; Lion Feuchtwanger, Jephthah and His Daughter; Thomas Mann, Joseph and His Brothers. Art Resources: Régis Debray, The Old Testament through 100 Masterpieces of Art; Joan Goodnick Westenholz, Images of Inspiration; Chiara de Capoa, Old Testament Figures in Art; Ellen Frankel, Illustrated Hebrew Bible. Music: Gioachino Rossini, Mosè in Egitto; Cristiano Giuseppe Lidarti, Esther; Carl Nielsen, Saul og David; Arnold Schoenberg, Moses und Aron; Camille Saint-Saens, Samson et Dalila; George Frideric Handel, Samson; Giuseppe Verdi, Nabucco. Films: The Ten Commandments (1923 & 1956 versions); Samson and Delilah (1949); David and Bathsheba (1951); The Story of Ruth (1960); King David (1985). (subject to change)

COURSE DIRECTOR: Carl Ehrlich

JP 1000 6.0 Elementary Modern Standard Japanese

Basics of spoken Japanese, with strong emphasis on immediate practical usefulness in everyday situations, the two kana syllabaries, approximately 150 Kanji (Sino-Japanese characters) and elementary reading are covered. Simple sentence grammar is focused on. No previous knowledge of the language is assumed.

Course credit exclusions: None.

YDSH 1000 6.0A ELEMENTARY YIDDISH LANGUAGE

FACULTY: AP

The course focuses on basic literacy, grammar and conversation. New vocabulary and grammatical structures are practiced through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students are introduced to aspects of Yiddish culture through film and music.

PREREQUISITE: None. This course is an introduction to Yiddish designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language, no formal training in the language and with little family background, if any. Department Course Entry Authorization slip required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT.

EVALUATION: Class participation and attendance - 20%, assignments - 20%, quizzes - 20%, mid-term tests (2) - 20%, final examination - 20%

TEXTS: Uriel Weinreich. College Yiddish. New York:YIVO, 1994, or other editions and Course Kit.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA