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ANTHROPOLOGY

 

AP/ANTH 2100 6.00  FROM EMPIRE TO GLOBALIZATION:    

                                       ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES

Course Director: A. Sorge

 

This course analyzes and critiques the social and cultural foundations of historical and contemporary forms of capitalism, development and globalization from an anthropological perspective. As part of this critique we examine forms of on-the-ground resistance around the world.

 

Course credit exclusions: AP/ANTH 2100 3.00, AP/ANTH 2100 6.00 (prior to Fall 2012).

Prior to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/ANTH 2100 6.00.

 

 

AP/ANTH 3570 6.00 ANTHROPOLOGY, ISLAM AND MUSLIM SOCIETIES

Course Directors: T. Ahmad

This course examines debates amongst anthropologists about the study of Islam and Muslim societies, and Muslim expressions of Islam according to anthropological themes including the body, space, ritual, knowledge, agency and representation. Students design and undertake a field-based research project.

Course credit exclusion: AP/ANTH 4180 6.00 (prior to Fall 2013).

 

 

AP/ANTH 4350 3.00 (FALL) PERSPECTIVES IN VISUAL

                                                       ANTHROPOLOGY

Course Director: TBA

 

This course examines how humans produce, receive and use visual media (i.e., photographs, film, etc.) in different societies and cultures, how the visual is differentiated from other forms of expression, and the social and cultural apparatus that support such processes.

 

Prior to Fall 2009: Course Credit Exclusion: AS/ANTH 4350 3.00.

 

 

ENGLISH

 

* AP/EN 3031 6.00 DIASPORA THEORY

 

 

 This course explores theories of Diaspora, exile, transnationalism, dispossession, and borderlands as lenses for thinking through contemporary literary and cultural movements.  This course full integrates academic writing and critical thinking as means of learning complex literary and cultural theories, as well as literary form and content; it attends to the aesthetics as well as the politics of diasporic and transnational writing.  Students are expected to produce scholarly research papers that demonstrate substantial engagement with the theoretical material.

  

Prior to Fall 2009: AP/EN 3031 6.00 (Diaspora Theory) was AS/EN 3442 6.00 (Diaspora

Literature and Theory)

 

*NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

*AP/EN 3240 6.00 RACIAL MINORITY WRITING IN CANADA

 

 An examination of the meaning of post-coloniality in the Canadian context by focusing on the work of writers of Native, Caribbean and South Asian backgrounds. It would be fruitful to study them together as their work provides a foreground to the experience of colonialism.

Course credit exclusions: None.

 

Prior to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/EN 3440 6.00.

  

*NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

  

 

*AP/EN 3430 6.00 SOUTH ASIAN LITERATURE

 

 The course introduces students to the literature and theory currently categorized as Post- Colonial by means of a focus of texts written in English by authors originating in the geographical region known as South Asia (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka).

 

 Course credit exclusions: None.

 

Prior to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/EN 2372 6.00.

*NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

 

 

GEOGRAPHY

 

 

AP/GEOG 3370 3.00 (FALL) INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT:

                                            CRITICAL GEOGRAPHICAL PERSPECTIVES

Course Director: J. Hyndman

The course deals with conceptual debates on 'Third World' development. It explores issues of development including economic growth and poverty, resource use, agrarian change, industrial transformation, service-sector development, rural-urban inequality, gender relations, neoliberalism and imperialism, and prospect for democracy and macro-level structural social change.

 

Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or written permission of the Instructor.

Course credit exclusions: AS/GEOG 3370 3.00, AS/GEOG 4370 3.00.

 

*AP/GEOG 3710 3.00 SOCIETY, SPACE AND ENVIRONMENT IN SOUTH

                                        ASIA

 

This course deals with the historical-geographical specificities of South Asia that are products of its own internal economic-political evolution and physical environmental context as well as of its historical and contemporary linkages to other parts of the world.

 

Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including at least one of AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AP/SC/GEOG 1400 6.00, or written permission of the course director.

Prior to Fall 2009: Prerequisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including at least one of AS/GEOG  1000  6.00  or  AS/GEOG  1410  6.00  or  AS/SC/GEOG  1400  6.00,  or  written permission of the course director.

Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3710 3.00.

 

*NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

 

 

HISTORY

 

*AP/HIST 1065 6.00 THE INDIAN OCEAN, 1500-1800

This course investigates themes in the history of the Indian Ocean from 1500 to 1800 prior to European domination. Special attention s placed on the role played by the  peoples inhabiting the Islamic regions as well as the problem of European penetration.

 

Course Credit Exclusion: AS/HIST 1000M 6.00.

 

*NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

AP/HIST 2790 6.00A  ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION, 622 – 1400

Course Director: T. Abdullah Sam

This course will survey the diverse history of Islamic societies from the seventh to the thirteenth centuries. Topics include: the pre-Islamic Middle East; Arabian society; Muhammad and the rise of the new religion; the expansion of Islam in Asia, Africa, and Europe; the fundamental belief system of Islam; the Caliphate of Baghdad; the development of various schools of Islamic theology, mysticism, philosophy, science, and the arts; the commercial revolution of the Middle Ages; and the problems of continuity and change. Political, social, cultural, and economic institutions will receive roughly equal treatment. While the course considers trends affecting the Islamic world as a whole, the primary focus will be the central Islamic lands of the Middle East. Students will be introduced to several primary source materials in translation such as selections from the Qur’an and from poetry and medieval fiction, as well as from travellers’ accounts.

Course Credit Exclusions: Prior to Fall 2009: AK/HIST 3530 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2000-2001), AS/HIST 2790 6.00, AS/HIST 3790 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2000-2001).


 

*AP/HIST 3791 6.00 THE ISLAMIC GUNPOWDER EMPIRES

 

 This course studies, in a comparative fashion, the rise, consolidation and decline of the three major early modern Islamic empires (the Ottoman Turks, the Safavids of Persia and the Mughals of India) between 1500 to 1800.

 

Class Format: Three-hour lecture a one-hour tutorial

Prior to Fall 2009: Course Credit Exclusion: AS/HIST 3791 6.00.

 

*NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

 

 

*AP/HIST 3795 6.00 MODERN INDIA

  

This course examines the development of modern India, from the late Mughal era through the British colonial period to the present.

   

Course Credit Exclusions: AP/HIST 3796 3.00, AP/HIST 3797 3.00.

Prior to Fall 2009: Course Credit Exclusions: AK/HIST 3910 6.00, AS/HIST 3795 6.00, AS/HIST 3930E 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004).

*NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

 

 

*AP/HIST 3796 3.00 MODERN INDIA: MUGHAL ERA THROUGH 19TH

                                     CENTURY

  

Examines  the  development  of  modern  India,  from  the  late  Mughal  era  through  the consolidation of British colonial rule.

 

Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 3795 6.00.

 

* NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 


*AP/HIST 3797 3.00 INDIA IN THE 20th CENTURY

 

 

Examines  the  history  of  India  in  the  20th  century,  including  British  colonial  rule,  theIndependence movement, Partition, and the development of the Republic of India since 1948.

 

 Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 3795 6.00.

 

* NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

 

 

 

*AP/HIST 3798 3.00 TOPICS IN MODERN INDIAN HISTORY

  

Examines on a rotating basis key topics in the history of India in the 18th to 20th centuries. Details will vary from year to year, depending on the Course Director's choice.

 

* NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

 

 

HINDI – DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES,

LITERATURES AND LINGUISTICS

 

AP/HND 1000 6.00 ELEMENTARY HINDI-URDU

Course Director: S.Nijhawan

The objective of this course is to learn the Hindi writing system (Nagari script) and to develop basic oral and written skills of modern standard Hindi. You will be introduced to formal grammar and essential vocabulary of Hindi and we will practice grammatical concepts and conversational skills in class and in the multimedia language centre. Equal time is spent on reading, writing, listening and speaking comprehension. Texts used in this course provide cultural information about South Asia and the diaspora.

Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of Hindi or Urdu.  Departmental Course Entry Authorization slip is required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HND 1000 6.00.

 

 

* AP/HND 2000 6.00 INTERMEDIATE HINDI-URDU

  

The course continues the work covered at the elementary level, and introduces students to the Urdu (Nastaliq) script. It focuses on the acquisition of more complex grammatical structures, studying idiomatic expressions, expanding vocabulary and practice of conversational skills. Readings provide cultural information about South Asia and the diaspora. They are selected from Hindi literature (prose and poetry), popular movies and documentaries as well as songs.

 

Class Format: Four class hours per week

Prerequisite: AS/HND1000 6.00 or basic knowledge of the Nagari script (reading and writing)

and knowledge of modern standard Hindi grammar. Students who have not completed HND1000 but have studied Hindi in other contexts (school, home, through movies) must take a placement test prior to enrolment. This course is not open to native speakers.

 

* NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

 

AP/HND 2700 6.00  SOUTH ASIAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Course Director: S. Nijhawan

 

The objective of this course is to acquire an understanding of the diverse manifestations of South Asian culture in history and the present day. We explore how South Asian culture is imagined and how cultural traditions are embedded in vernacular literature and the popular media. In discussing questions of ideology, representation and cultural memory through the lens of analytical concepts as gender, class and caste, we will investigate how mainstream cultural manifestations are transmitted, contested and/or reified in literature and film.

 

Class Format: Three class hours per week

Projected Enrolment: 30

Course credit exclusions: None

Prior to Fall 2009:Course credit exclusion: AS/HIND 2700 6.00.

 

AP/HND 3600 3.00  (FALL) SOUTH ASIAN FEMALE LITERARY ACTIVISM

Course Director: S. Nijhawan

 

The course introduces students to the writings, political activism and films of women from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and the South Asian diaspora in the last century and the present day. All texts are in English translation.

 

Prior to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIND 3600 3.00.

 

AP/HND 3610 3.00 (WINTER)  WRITINGS OF PREMCHAND (1880-1936)

Course Director: S. Nijhawan

Premchand (1880-1936) is one of the most eminent writers of modern Hindi-Urdu fiction. The course introduces students to his oeuvre as it emerged in a period of heightened nationalist consciousness and anti-colonial activism.

 

Note: Knowledge of Hindi and/or Urdu is not required. All readings are available in English translations. Students with advanced knowledge of Hindi and/or Urdu are encouraged to read the original test.

 

*AP/HND 3710 3.00 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURES OF THE SOUTH

                                      ASIAN DIASPORA

 

The course investigates the phenomenon of South Asian diaspora in modern, postcolonial, and global contexts. It examines an interdisciplinary literature in English from the Humanities and Social  Sciences  in  order  to  establish  the  social  features  of  diaspora  and  the  cultural expressions of the diasporic condition through a consideration of theoretical, literary, and ethnographic texts.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Note: Knowledge of Hindi and/or Urdu is not required.

 

* NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

HUMANITIES

 

AP/HUMA 1846 6.00 INDIA: LIFE, CULTURE AND THE ARTS

Course Director: S. Krishnamurti

Note: This is an approved LA&PS General Education course.

This course examines contemporary life and society in India as it is going through a process of all round development, reintegrating traditions and responding to new influences.

Course credit exclusion: AP/HUMA 2440 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014).

 

*AP/HUMA 1855 9.00 BUDDHISM AND ASIAN CULTURES

  

Note: This is an approved LA&PS General Education course

 

This course introduces students to the diversity of Buddhist ideas and practices in Asia. Exploring Buddhism as a living tradition, the course focuses on the impact and interpretation of Buddhism in historical and contemporary cultures.  The course develops a background in basic Buddhist philosophy in order to explore its broader cultural impact in literature, art, ritual, ethics, economics, social interaction and politics.

 

* NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

AP/HUMA 1865 6.00 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD RELIGIONS

Course Director: A. Goldberg

Note: This is an approved LA&PS General Education course.

A comparative examination of the history, literature, practices and social aspects of the religious traditions of South Asia (Buddhism, Hinduism), East Asia (China, Korea, Japan), Europe and West Asia (Judaism, Christianity and Islam), Africa and Native America. Note: Not all traditions will be offered in any given year. Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

Cross-listed to: AP/SOSC 2600 6.00

Course credit exclusions: AP/HUMA 1860 6.00, AP/HUMA 2800 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014), AP/SOSC 2600 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014)

 

*AP/HUMA 3801 6.00 THINKING RELIGION IN SOUTH ASIA: TEACHINGS

                                        AND ORIENTALISM

  

This  course  explores  the  teachings  of  selected  religious  traditions  of  South  Asian  and examines the category of religion as it is applied to South Asia in the context of oriental discourses.

 

Course credit exclusions: None.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 3801 6.00.

* NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

AP/HUMA 3802 3.00 (FALL)  SIKH HISTORY AND THOUGHT:   

                                          DEVELOPMENT AND INTERPRETATION

 Course Director: TBA

 

This course introduces Sikhism by exploring its main historical developments and religio-philosophical teachings. To understand these historical and religious discourses within their broader social settings a number of themes and contexts are explored: scripture, interpretation, gender, colonialism and the diaspora.

 

Cross-listed to: AP/MIST 3802 3.00

 

 

*AP/HUMA 4770 3.00 BUDDHISM IN MODERN SOUTHEAST ASIA:

                                       COMMUNITY, CONFLICT AND CHANGE

 

Explores Buddhist responses to the changing conditions of modernity in Southeast Asia. Seeking to understand Buddhism as a living religion, it investigates how Buddhists have drawn on religious narratives, symbols and rituals to respond to social and political challenges from the nineteenth century to the present, including issues of religious reform, colonialism, nationalism and ethnicity.

 

*NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

AP/HUMA 4816 6.00A WOMEN IN ISLAMIC LITERATURES 

Course Director: TBA

 

The course focuses on the representation of Muslim women in modern Islamic literatures (novel and short stories) and other forms of Islamic cultural production, such as photography and film.

 

Prior to Fall 2009: Course Credit Exclusions: AS/HUMA 4890C 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004)

 

LINGUISTICS (DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES, LITERATURES AND

                            LINGUISITCS)

 

* AP/LING 2460 3.00 SOUTH ASIAN LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY

 

 

A survey of the diversity and unity of language in the South Asian cultural area and in South Asian diasporic communities focusing on the role of language in defining identity and in mediating social and cultural change.

 

Prior to Fall 2009: Course Credit Exclusion: AS/LING 2460 3.00.

 

*NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

PHILOSOPHY

 

AP/PHIL 2035 3.00 (WINTER)  ASIAN PHILOSOPHICAL TRADITIONS

Course Director: S. Ranganathan

An introduction to the major philosophical traditions of India and China.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/PHIL 2035 3.00.

 

AP/PHIL 3095 3.00 (WINTER) PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

Course Director: G. Naddaf   

How do theistic philosophies deal with the fact of evil? Are religious language and forms of knowing distinct from other forms? What are the moral and ethical issues inherent in religious propagation?

Prerequisite: AP/PHIL 2090 3.00 or at least six credits in philosophy.

Course credit exclusions: None. 

 

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

 

AP/POLS 3560 6.00  THE GLOBAL SOUTH: POLITICS, POLICY AND

                                        DEVELOPMENT

Course Director: TBA

 

This course explores various dimensions of the global south, with emphasis on political-economy and development. It examines the similarities and differences between various local experiences in the global south and explores their contemporary dynamic in a historical context.

 

Prior to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/POLS 3560 6.00.

 

* AP/POLS 4265 3.00 HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY IN ASIA

  

The course examines the international politics of human rights and democracy in the region as a window on theoretical and other debates over the universality, origins and purposes of these norms and related institutions in a context of globalization.

 

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/POLS 4265 3.00, AS/POLS 4705 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004).

 

*NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

 

AP/POLS 4480 3.00 (WINTER) INDIA IN THE 21st CENTURY: JUSTICE,

                                                          DEVELOPMENT, DEMOCRACY

Course Director: A. Mukherjee-Reed

The course explores 21st century India, its spectacular growth, its staggering inequalities and its struggles for justice. How does economic growth affect the substance of democracy? How should deeply unequal democracies negotiate competing visions of justice? What could a just democracy look like? Beginning with theoretical explorations of justice, development and democracy, it analyzes Independent India, particularly since the eighties.

 

 

* AP/POLS 4590 3.00 POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTH ASIA

(formerly Political Development in India)

 

This course explores various dimensions of South Asian political development, with emphasis on political-economy and developmental issues. It examines the similarities and differences between different South Asian nations and explores their contemporary dynamic in a historical context.

 

Class Format: Three-hour lecture

Projected Enrolment: 25

Integrated with: GS/POLS 5590 3.00.

 

*NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015


 

* AP/POLS 4595 3.00 ASIA IN THE NEW GLOBAL ORDER

(formerly Southeast Asia in the New Global Order)

 

 

Using Southeast Asia as its focus, this course addresses questions relating to economic development,  political  change  and  regional  security  in  the  emerging  global  order.  It  will stimulate interest in politics and international relations of developing countries in Southeast Asia.

 

Class Format: Three-hour lecture

Projected Enrolment: 25

 

*NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE (GLENDON)

 

*GL/POLS 4685 3.00 THE FOREIGN POLICY OF MAJOR ASIAN STATES

 

A comparative study of the foreign policies in China, Japan and India, with an emphasis on policy-making  and  policy  outputs.  Examples  will  be  drawn  from  territorial,  security  and economic issues. Prerequisite: GL/POLS 2920 6.00 or permission of the instructor.

 

Course Credit Exclusion: GL/POLS 4010 3.00 (Fall/Winter 2001-2002).

 

* NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

 

SOCIAL SCIENCE

 

AP/SOSC 1430 9.00   INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL

                                        DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

Course Director: E. Canel

 

Note: This is an approved LA&PS General Education course.

 

This foundation course introduces students to the field of International Development Studies. It adopts an interdisciplinary approach to study the theory and practice of development, and draws from the works of historians, sociologists, political scientists, anthropologists, and economists to introduce relevant concepts and theories of development. The course examines various approaches to development and explores their theoretical and cultural assumptions, and their concrete application in diverse historical and social contexts. The course helps students understand the processes that created underdevelopment, the forces that contribute to the persistence of this condition, and the struggles for equitable and sustainable development in the current global system. As part of the General Education Program, this course has been especially designed to help students develop specific academic skills in the areas of critical thinking, reading and writing, and to challenge them to apply these skills to the field of international development studies.

 

Course Credit Exclusion: AS/SOSC 1439 9.00.

 

AP/SOSC 1750 9.00 THE DEVELOPMENT OF URBAN ECONOMIES:

                                      COMPARING CANADA AND THE THIRD WORLD

Course Director: I. Rajagopal

 

Note: This is an approved LA&PS General Education course.

 

This course compares urban economic development in Canada and the Third World in terms of industrialization, urbanization and economic dependency. Themes are: colonial cities and industrial dependence; the multinational corporation, technological dependence and urban employment; urban problems and alternative solutions. 

 

Course credit exclusions: AP/SOSC 1740 9.00. 

Prior to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 1740 9.00.

 

* AP/SOSC 3541 3.00 LAND, FOOD AND DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA AND

                                        SOUTH ASIA

 

This course explores the culture and political economy of food in Africa and South Asia, first in historical   and   comparative   perspective,   and   second   in   the   context   of   international development. The study of local and international struggles over land and resources focus the enquiry.

 

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 3541 3.00.

 

* NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

AP/SOSC 3970 6.00 INDIA: CULTURE AND SOCIETY

Course Director: V. Agnew

The course examines some of the major political and social developments in India since independence. India has made some significant progress in the last fifty years but it is constantly faced with new political, social, and economic challenges. A majority of India's population struggles with poverty and deprivation in rural and urban India. We examine some of the causes of poverty, political and economic initiatives to alleviate it, and the social movements that it has spawned. The course will discuss some themes in detail such as the women's movement, caste politics, Congress and the BJP government, and the emergence and growth of religious conflict. It will include readings from a variety of disciplines and will integrate novels and films, which deal with relevant themes.

 

*AP/SOSC 4170 6.00 Gender Relations in the Third World

 

 The course draws from feminist theory, pre- and post-colonial political economy, and theories of discourse and ideology to explore the social relations of gender in the Third World. Africa provides the focus; other regions form the basis for comparative study.

 

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 4170 6.00.

 

* NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

 

AP/SOSC 4436 6.00 INDIA AND GLOBALIZATION

Course Director: V. Agnew

This course analyzes the extent to which globalization has transformed India. It considers whether the process has exacerbated inequalities in the distribution of resources and income within the country. We do this by focusing on (a) the economy, particularly service and information technologies; (b) social transformation through use of various communication technologies; and (c) the emigration of professional and educated elites.

Course credit exclusion: None.

Prior to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 2435 6.00.

 

SOCIOLOGY

 

AP/SOCI 3430 6.00 (Sections A & M) ETHNICITY, POWER AND IDENTITY

(Formerly Race & Ethnic Relations in Western Society)

Course Directors: H. Park/ TBA

This course introduces students to contemporary issues in ethnicity, power and identity in international perspective. Sociological and anthropological theories on ethnicity, race, culture and identity form the conceptual basis for this course. 

Course credit exclusions: AP/MIST 3580 6.00, AP/REI 3580 6.00 (prior to Fall 2013).

Prior to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/SOCI 3430 6.00, AK/SOCI 3580 6.00, AK/SOSC 3350 6.00.

 

AP/SOCI 3650 3.00/6.00 THE SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION

Course Director: TBA

This course explores the persistence of religion in contemporary societies. Particular attention is given to the theorists of the sociology of religion, such as Durkheim, Weber and Peter Berger.

Course credit exclusion: AP/SOCI 3650 6.00.

Prior to Fall 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/SOCI 3650 6.00.

 

AP/SOCI 4450 6.00 WOMEN IN DEVELOPMENT

Course Director: S. Bawa

This course critically explores the notion of “Women in Development” in its different meanings in terms of politics, economy and culture.

The first part of the course examines the idea of “development” both as an analytical concept and a socio-economic and political situation in a national and global context. In doing this, we will also look at culture and the roles it plays in the civil society.

The second part concentrates on locating women as agents and subjects within the general framework of “development” and in assessing their mutual relations. It examines “gender” in relation to globalization, nationalism, class and ‘race’/caste.

 

CULTURAL SUTDIES - FINE ARTS

 

* FA/FACS 3900A 6.00 ARTS AND CULTURES: SOUTH ASIA

 

Focuses on issues of post coloniality and art from various cultural contexts in South Asia such as India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. We will draw from these specific cultural contexts, as well as from traditional and contemporary artists and performers which work and live within the South Asian postcolony. Participation may include field trips to museums, art galleries, dance and music performances, cinemas or theatres.

 

Prerequisite: FA/FACS 1900 6.00 and third-year standing or permission of the course director.

 

* NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

MUSIC - FINE ARTS

 

 

FA/MUSI 1500 6.00 THE MUSIC OF BOLLYWOOD FILMS

Course Directors: S. Viswanathan & TBA

Examines the use of music in Indian popular cinema (the Bollywood musical) through a detailed analysis of the genre. The careful consideration of music as it relates to story lines and plots, styles and forms, cultural roots, historical development, financial structures, and social implications of the genre will attempt to show why the music of Bollywood cuts across the cultural, religious, and socio-economic borders to form an important part of India's national and diasporic identify. Music directors and composers/performers studied will include: Naushad, S.D. Burman, Shanker-Jaikishen, O.P. Nayyar, Usha Khanna, Madan Mohan, R.D. Burman, Bappi Lahiri, A.R. Rehman.

Prerequisite: None. No previous musical training is required. This course is directed towards non-majors.

 

* FA/MUSI 2040 6.00 SOUTH INDIAN MUSIC

  

Practical training in the performance styles of South Indian Classical music. Some of the appropriate theory, terminology and cultural background is considered.

 

 Prerequisite: Permission of the course director, by audition. No prior experience is necessary

 

* NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

* FA/MUSI 3040 6.00 SOUTH INDIAN MUSIC

 

 

Practical training in the performance styles of South Indian Classical music. Some of the appropriate theory, terminology and cultural background is considered.

A continuation of FA/MUSI 2040 6.00.

 

Prerequisites: FA/MUSI 2040 6.00 and permission of the course director, by audition.

 

* NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015

 

FA/MUSI 3320 3.00 (FALL) MUSIC OF INDIA

Course Director: TBA

 

Studies theoretical systems and contemporary performance styles in relation to one another and in the context of a number of closely related aspects of Indian culture.

Prerequisites or corequisites: Foundation courses. Open to non-majors/minors by permission of the course director.

 

* FA/MUSI 4040 6.00 SOUTH INDIAN MUSIC

  

Practical training in the performance styles of South Indian Classical music. Some of the appropriate theory, terminology and cultural background is considered. A continuation of FA/MUSI 3040 6.00.

 

Prerequisites: Permission of the course director, by audition.

 

* NOT OFFERED IN 2014-2015