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Course Descriptions

AP/WRIT 1000 3.0 Academic Writing in the Social Sciences

The aim of WRIT 1000, Academic Writing in the Social Sciences, is to help students become more effective and persuasive essay writers. The major task for each student is the successful completion of a research essay, which begins in September and ends in April. During this time, students will learn to develop both pre-writing and writing skills, with a major emphasis on analysis of the assignment, thesis development, and research and reading skills in the ?pre-writing? component of the course; and on revision and composing for an audience in the 'writing' section of the course. While the focus is on Social Science writing students will develop strategies that they can apply in a wide variety of writing contexts.

Evaluation:
Evaluation will be based on short, skills-oriented writing assignments, a course journal, a major research essay both in draft and revised form, as well as class participation.

Required Texts: Tom Greenwald, Essay Writing Strategies, Captus (2001)

Course Instructor: Tom Greenwald

Projected Enrolment: 25

Format: 90 minute lecture

AP/CAW 1100 3.0 Studies in the University

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of university education. It combines an examination of York University as an institution in its historical, political and social context with instruction in reading, thinking and writing at a university level.

The course takes the University itself as its object of study as a way of making students aware of the demands and opportunities of environment within which they operate. It looks at the history of York University in the context of the development of universities as institutions of higher learning in Europe and North America. It explores the present structures and practices of York University and seeks to relate these to the University's social and political setting within Toronto, Ontario and Canada. Special attention is given to current issues which directly affect students, such as accessibility, the curriculum, teaching and evaluation, student fees and student services, as well as to some of the educational and developmental theories which inform present practices.

This is also a writing-intensive course intended to help students develop their abilities to read, think and write at a university level. It offers explicit instruction in strategies for reading different kinds of texts, for analysing the arguments of others, for developing one's own ideas and arguments, and for presenting these ideas and arguments in writing.

Evaluation:

Details of evaluation will vary from section to section but will be based primarily on written assignments and in-class writing exercises. Assignments will be done in stages, with incentives for revision.

Summary of an argument 5%
Reading Strategy Sheet (Literature) 5%
Journal on educational issues (weekly) 20%
Reflection on Journal (1 per term: 10% each) 20%
Oral report on an aspect of the University 10%
Essay on an aspect of the University, 2 drafts 20%
In-class writing exercises 20%

Instructor: TBA

Projected Enrolment: 20

Format: 90 minute lecture

AP/WRIT 1200 3.0A Academic Reading, Thinking and Writing in the Humanities

This course seeks to help students develop the critical skills (reading, thinking, writing) required to write effective essays in the Humanities. Since academic writing is the result of clear thinking, sound reasoning, and the correct interpretation and use of scholarly texts, this course does not focus solely on the production of essays, but on the intellectual journey that must be undertaken in order to achieve it. Writing and related critical skills, however, are best learned within a specific academic or thematic context, and the novel and short readings in theory and literature found in the course kit will serve as microcosms for this exploration.

Evaluation: To be announced

Required Texts: To be announced

Course Instructor: TBA

Projected Enrolment: 25

Format: 90 minute lecture/workshop

AP/WRIT 1300 3.0 Theories of Writing

This course assists students to examine and apply some of the recent research findings on the act of writing from a variety of disciplines. The course content will emphasize the main writing theories stemming from the work of cognitive psychologists, linguists, communication theorists, and educationists. Through this research we will analyze such issues as reading theory, grammar and style, idea generation, the writing process, composing, technology and writing, and writing genres.

Evaluation:

Research Essay: 25%
Class Presentation and Participation: 35%
Mid-term Examination: 20%
End-term Examination: 20%

Course Readings:

WRIT 1300 3.0 Course kit (to be purchased at York Bookstore)

Course Director: TBA

Projected Enrollment: 125

Format: Two hour lecture and one hour tutorial

AP/WRIT 1400 6.0 Critical Thinking, Reading and Writing:

This is a full year course, designated to help students early in their programs improve their academic skills in reading a text, evaluating the point of view expressed in the text, expressing ideas orally and in written form and learning research methods and the use of resources. The course uses material from the social sciences and humanities to explore a variety of social issues. Small class size, frequent writing assignments and opportunity for class presentations provide an intensive focus on academic skills that will serve you well in your later work.

Evaluation: To be announced

Sample/Required Readings: To be announced

Course Director:  TBA

Projected Enrolment:  30

Format:  Three hour seminar

AP WRIT 1500 3.0 Writing and Computers
In this course, we will explore some of what we have learned from the recent research on the writing process, on writing with computers and on writing online webtexts.   We will also consider how digital writing will continue to alter, often in radical ways, the ways humans go about the act of writing, and some of the ways we will have to adapt our own writing in this new digital world.  In addition to our weekly readings and tutorial discussion, we will also use a course wiki to interact online and to produce our own webtexts.

Evaluation:

Class and Online Participation: 20%
Writing Assignment One 10%
Writing Assignment Two 25%
Group Presentation 25%
Final Examination 20%

Required Texts:

All readings will be available online through the York Libraries.

Course Instructor: John Spencer

Projected Enrolment: 25

AP/WRIT 1600 3.0 Academic Writing: Developing Sentence Sense

This course examines theoretical issues and debates around the role of grammar and style in the writing process, while providing students with strategies for dealing with sentence-level issues in their own university writing. Some of the contested issues to be considered include: 1) the politics of correctness: oppression or liberation; 2) responses to the much-cited studies of the 1960s and 70s showing that traditional grammar instruction has no positive effect on improving student writing and that there is little, if any, transfer of formal grammar instruction to the writing that students themselves do; and 3) current discussions about the most effective ways to ?reconnect grammar and writing.

Exercises and assignments focus on exploring the rhetorical effects of stylistic choices (in vocabulary, syntax, and matters of usage, e.g.) both in what students read and, more centrally, what they write. Particular attention is given to sentence structure and to experimenting with syntax as a way to generate ideas and clarify the relations among them. By increasing awareness of the stylistic and syntactic options at their disposal, the course aims to help students become stronger and more sophisticated writers of academic essays and better editors of their own work.

Evaluation:

A writer's log 10%
In-class writing exercises (to include work on sentence-combining and sentence generating) 20%
2 short essays (3-4 pages) with emphasis on revision 40%
Test 20%
Class participation 10%

Required Texts:

WRIT 1600 3.0 Course kit (to be purchased in York Bookstore)

Course Instructor: TBA

Projected Enrollment: 25

Format: 90 minute lecture

AP/WRIT 1980 9.0 Professional Writing: Process and Practice

(Cross-listed as AP/EN 1700 9.0 and AP/HUMA 1980 9.0)

"Professional Writing: Process and Practice" is a Foundations course and the introductory course for the Professional Writing Programme. Throughout the academic term, it considers fiction and nonfiction, including short stories, novels, memoirs, critical essays and reviews. The process of writing is fore grounded, with emphasis on theories of composing, writer and reader based prose, audience, voice, rhetoric and revision. The interrelationship of critical reading, thinking and writing is central to the course.

Evaluation:

Active participation in Peer Workshops - 20%
Collaborative writing assignment - 15%
Three essay assignments - 15% each
Final examination - 20%

Representative Readings:

WRIT/HUMA 1980 / EN 1700 9.0 Course kit (to be purchased in York Bookstore)
The Broadview Guide to Writing, (Broadview Press)
Huxley, A., Brave New World
Kaysen, S., Girl Interrupted
Martel, Y., Life of Pi
Orwell, G., Nineteen Eighty-Four
Postman, N., Amusing Ourselves to Death
Berger, J., Ways of Seeing
Spiegelman, A., Maus

Required Films and Videos:

An Inconvenient Truth
Frida
Mickey Mouse Monopoly

Instructor: TBA

Projected Enrolment: 200

Format: 2 hour lecture, 2 hour tutorials

AP/WRIT 2000 3.0 Writing and Research in Business:

This course develops writing and research skills, with a focus on contemporary issues relevant to Canadian business concerns.  The goal of the course is to develop critical thinking, reading, research, and writing skills using material germane to students' chosen field of study. Research skills will include Internet searches and source evaluation; and library resources.  Elements of effective presentations, including use of PowerPoint, will also be discussed.

Evaluation:: To be announced

Required Texts: To be announced

Course Instructor: TBA

Projected Enrolment: 25

Format: Three hour Seminar

AP/ WRIT 2100 3.0 Stories in Non-Fiction

WRIT 2100.03 will introduce students to the history and practice of several nonfiction genres, from the personal essay to magazine articles and reviews, profiles and investigative journalism. Online, students will find lectures on the history of prose, on genre, style and rhetoric, along with lectures modeling rhetorical and stylistic analyses of each week?s reading. Also online, students will engage in class discussion, responding each week to the reading and to one another's opinions and arguments, and engaging with writing as craft and process on several levels: grammar, rhetoric, style, and argument. NB: This is a half course in the Winter term consisting of weekly classes of 90 minutes in a computer lab or online. Previous computer experience is not required.

Course Rationale:

In the computer lab you will engage in dialogue, in writing - written conversation. You will gain the "experience of reasoning in writing," and the competence you already have in speech and informal writing when reasoning about public issues and conflicts will begin to show up in your performance of written reasoning. Although you are all competent when talking and arguing, you are likely to be less competent when writing university essays. Written conversation, informal reasoning in writing, can be a bridge to, and a tempering of, the kind of analytic rigour required in academic papers, where you have to defend a precisely stated thesis in a logically developing argument.

Evaluation:

Reflections (750 words) 15%
Magazine article analysis 15%
Essay (1500 words) 30%
Conferencing (12 online class discussions) 30%
Participation 10%

Required Texts:

Phillip Lopate, ed. The Art of the Personal Essay, 1994.

Some readings will be available on the course web site or elsewhere online.

Course Instructor: Dr. John Blazina

Projected Enrollment: 50

AP/ WRIT 2200 3.0 New Challenges in Academic Writing

This course addresses the question: where is the essay going in a multicultural, pluralistic setting like York? In doing so, it explores the developing range of expectations which students face in their writing in university, from both a practical and theoretical point of view.   It considers how the practices of the university have changed in attempting to respond to demands and rights of an increasingly mixed student body and society. 

Practically it looks at the range of 'voices' students are likely to encounter in their course readings, and the corresponding changes in the expectations, difficulties and possibilities they may face in their writing assignments. By analyzing and working on representative readings and writing assignments from a variety of disciplines, including those from courses which the students are presently enrolled in, the course outlines the conventions of argumentation in essay writing that have prevailed in the university, and more recent departures from those, in order to help students determine what is appropriate and possible in the case of each assignment.  Negotiating these assignments from the position of a personally-held orthodoxy (religious, political) is a particular area of concern.  Theoretically, the course looks at the evolution of ideas of pluralism, and their manifestations in the Canadian setting and particularly in the contemporary university, with York as a striking example.

Theoretically, the course looks at the evolution of ideas of pluralism, and their manifestations in the Canadian setting and particularly in the contemporary university, with York as a striking example.

Evaluation:

Essays (1 per term): 40%
Oral presentations (1 per term): 30%
Discussion papers (2 per term): 20%
Class participation: 10%

Reading List:

Course Kit

Course Instructor: Brenda McComb

Projected Enrolment: 25

Format: 90 minute lecture

AP/ WRIT 2300 3.0 A Writer's Introduction to Research

A practical introduction to strategies for using library, online and other resources, this course develops students? abilities to formulate research plans, to evaluate and organize information, and to present it effectively and responsibly.

This course focuses on developing the research skills needed by professional writers working in non-academic settings. It approaches both research and writing, as recursive, problem-solving processes, seeing research as part of the writing process. Thus it places the formulation of research plans and research questions within the context of overall rhetorical planning for a piece of writing.

Students are taught how to develop search strategies and techniques for using libraries, the Internet and other sources, such as archives and people, to find answers to their questions. As students learn to integrate what they have found in their sources into their own writing, special emphasis is placed on the need to evaluate sources critically and methods for doing so, as well as on the ethical and legal issues involved.

This is a hands-on course with lectures and lab tutorials in alternate weeks. Bi-weekly lab assignments will give students experience in working with the issues and methodologies presented in lectures.

NB: Lectures are always on Tuesdays, but students must enroll and attend one of four labs, one of which is held in the same time slot as the lecture.

Evaluation:

4 marked lab assignments (10% each): 40%
Selected, annotated list of sources with research journal for major assignment: 15%
Major writing assignment:

Proposal: 5%
First Draft: 5%
Final Draft (not accepted without first draft): 20%
Class participation (including completion of unmarked lab assignments): 15%

Required Text:

Booth, Wayne C. et al. The Craft of Research. University of Chicago Press, 1995.

Course Instructor: Scott McLaren

Projected Enrollment: 125

Format: 90 minute lecture and 90 minute lab on alternate weeks.

AP/WRIT 2400 3.0 Writing History

This course explores and examines differing modes of historical writing and critical, conflicting interpretations of the past. In the process, we analyze how history as a discipline reflects a variety of methodologies, experiences, backgrounds, and perspectives/ideologies, while offering a diversity of viewpoints and writing styles.

The weekly classes consist of interactive, dynamic, and critical discussions and presentations, together with informative and insightful commentary, and lectures. Students read, and critically discuss monographs, articles, essays, and documents, honing both the critical skills involved in writing and an appreciation of different genres needed to complete their writing assignments. In crafting their papers and preparing for class, students implement the critical and historical skills stipulated by the variety of assignments and themes. Toward this end, the course offers students a number of intellectually stimulating and writing enhancing opportunities to capture and cultivate both disciplinary and stylistic elements of the course..

Evaluation:

3 writing assignments of approximately 4-5 pages long 10% each (10 X 3 = 30%)
in-class writing exercises 20%
class attendance & participation 20%
oral presentations 10%
final test 20%

Required Texts:

WRIT 2400 3.0 Course kit (to be purchased in York Bookstore)

Brooks, Stephen. America Through Foreign Eyes. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2002

Hofstadter, Richard. The American Political Tradition and the Men Who Made It. New York: Random House, 1989

Marius, Richard & Page, Melvin E.. A Short Guide to Writing About History, 6th Edition. Toronto: Pearson Education Incorporated, 2006

Course Instructor: Dr. Benjamin Lowinsky

Projected Enrolment: 25

Format: 90 minute lecture

AP/WRIT 3900 3.0 Professional Writing For Nurses:

This course develops writing skills appropriate to the professional needs of nurses. Focus on university research papers and health educational materials using Nursing curriculum-appropriate materials. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify effective strategies for locating research materials from nursing and related fields; define key elements of a research paper; describe strategies for giving successful formal and informal presentations; prepare written materials for a variety of audiences (professionals, patients, caregivers).

This course is open only to students in the Internationally Educated Nurses (IEN) program.

Evaluation: To be announced

Sample/Required Readings: To be announced

Course Director: TBA

Projected Enrolment: 30

Format: Three hour seminar

AP/WRIT 3988 3.0 Effective Writing and Research:

This course meets the needs of students further on in their degrees who would like to improve their ability to research and write university research papers. This one term course helps you to develop better library and internet research skills, and to write up your research more effectively. If writing research papers overwhelms you, or you are not doing as well as you would like to do in your courses, this course may be for you.

Prerequisite: 12 General Education credits or the equivalent.

Evaluation: To be announced

Sample/Required Readings: To be announced

Course Director: TBA

Projected Enrolment: 25

Format: Three hour seminar

AP/WRIT 3989 3.0 Writing in the Workplace:

This course is designed for students in a variety of professional courses. It examines various types of workplace related writing and oral communication. Examples are report writing, executive summary, business plan, presentation and collaborative writing. If you want to improve your writing and to understand the writing demands that await you, this course is for you.
Prerequisite:12 General Education credits or the equivalent.

Evaluation: To be announced

Sample/Required Readings: To be announced

Course Director: TBA

Projected Enrolment: 25

Format: Three hour seminar

AP/WRIT 4000 3.0 Activist Rhetorics

What are activist rhetorics? What are the relationships between activist rhetorics and democracy? How do activist rhetorics emerge from and/or motivate moments for social justice? How are political activist using multimedia to redefine activist interventions and activist rhetorics? What role does writing play in effecting social change? In this course students will engage with a wide range of activist rhetorics from around the world including manifestos, direct actions, zines, demonstrations, rallies, community newsletters, webcasts, webblogs and parades of resistance. We will also examine rhetorical/critical theory about the form and functions of politically effective discourses, and produce our own activist rhetorics/interventions.

Evaluation:

Reading Responses 30%
Presentation 10%
Campaign Profile 25%
Final Activist Rhetoric Project 35%

Students must complete all assignments successfully in order to be eligible to receive a passing grade for the course.

Required Texts:

Del Gandio, Jason. Rhetoric for Radicals: A Handbook for 21st Century Radicals. Gabriola Island, BC, Canada: New Society, 2008.

McKenzie-Stevens, Sharon and Patricia Malesh, Eds. Active Voices: Composing a Rhetoric for Social Movements. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2009

Course Instructor: TBA

Projected Enrollment: 25

Format: 3 hour lecture, one term only