NOV 21, 2017

TERM REVIEW

LECTURE 11

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The objective of the course is to introduce a critical understanding of the role of justice in the lives of children (pre-adolescence, adolescence and youth) as well the social and historical constitution of the changing rights of children.

To this end, the historical development of the concept of the “child” and the current social realities of children will be examined as well as they influence institutions of child socialization such as the family, friends, schools, law, and media.

 

Essentially, this course introduces students to think about and study the differential impact of culture in shaping the relationship(s) between justice and children.

The study of the impact of implicit and deliberate social policies on the constitution of childhood identity will be supplemented with a more fundamental concern for the child as social actor who is able to negotiate and resist forms of social pressure.  

The concept of childhood is examined in terms of the "social self", that is, the complex relationship between self and society (identity and ideologies).

This course moves beyond social psychology by investigating conceptually the “institutionalized” reproduction of the social "child".

Our inquiries into socialization implicate social, political and economic struggles that reflect fundamental issues of injustice and inequality.

Institutional forms of socialization are examined in terms of their respective relationship(s) with the state, political economy, law and culture. Children as offended against and as offenders (acting subjects and subjected actors) within the cultural calculus, are linked to hegemonic practices. For example, the social conditions of troubled children and children in trouble (poverty, abuse, violence, delinquency, etc.) informal and formal interventionist strategies and the consequences of containment, accommodation and resistance are highlighted. This course examines the relationship(s) of the self, groups, community and institutions; the interpretive framework for appreciating social realities; the location of agency and structure; generic processes of the situation; contexts, consequences and contests of meanings; challenges and prospects of linking the actor and community; theoretic convergences; and the  philosophy of the psychoanalysis.

Specifically, this course directs attention to the dynamic, dialectical and yet differential impact of ideologies on identities and institutions. We will investigate how ideologies shape policies and practices as well as the behavior and beliefs of children. How for example does law advance justice for children?

After completing this course, students should be able to interrogate how discourses and practice create children as ideologically appropriate subjects and how theories form and inform conflicting narratives of hegemonic articulations of dependencies and the actual experiences of injustice.

 

This course confronts contradictions inherent in liberal democratic (capitalist) states especially in the “official” authoritative treatment of children and related issues of fundamental equality.

This course seeks to provide a critical reading of children as a site of inquiry within comparative and historical contexts of political economy, cultural reproductions and hegemonic state and corporate practices".

 

Justice, as a set of texts, as narratives of inequality and as moments of morality are further contrasted. Moving well beyond the limitations of mainstream child socialization, this course encourages a progressive, strategic and engaged ‘praxis’ as a strategic site of social change.  

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Teaching and learning about justice and children allows students to understand the importance of treating people equitably and the responsibilities we all have to protect the rights of others. Upon the successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

The aims of this course are threefold:

First, to challenge the intellectual curiosities of students re.  Justice for children and youth   and facilitate the acquisition of intellectual tools:

Second, this course seeks to assist students in demonstrating a familiarity with the impact of ideologies on institutionalizing injustices in an effort to argue that the inherent normative nature of socialization in Canadian society exacerbates justice.

        Lastly, students are urged to engage in debates about the role of culture in framing consciousness, law, popular media, public perception and current controversies regarding diverse interventive strategies.

Key concepts: Culture, Children, Justice

Theme: The Impact of culture on the relationship between justice and children

Conceptual Framework: the role of ideologies in institutionalizing identities

 

 

 

 

 

GRADING EVALUATION for AP/HREQ 1800 6.00   A

Legend:

    E: Excellent; VG: Very Good; G: Good; W: Weak; I: Incomplete; NA: Not Applicable

Common Grading Scheme for Undergraduate Faculties

Approved by Senate Committee on Examinations and Academic Standards

GRADE,  GRADE POINT,  PER CENT RANGE  AND  DESCRIPTION

 

A+. 9. 90-100%. Exceptional Thorough knowledge of concepts and/or techniques and exceptional skill or great originality in the use of those concepts, techniques in satisfying the requirements of an assignment or course. 90%-100%

 

A. 8. 80-89%.  Excellent Thorough knowledge of concepts and/or techniques with a high degree of skill and/or some elements of originality in satisfying the requirements of an assignment or course.

 

B+. 7. 75-79%. Very Good Thorough knowledge of concepts and/or techniques with a fairly high degree of skill in the use of those concepts, techniques in satisfying the requirements of an assignment or course.

 

B. 6. 70-74%. Good Good level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques together with considerable skill in using them to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course.

 

C+. 5. 65-69%. Competent Acceptable level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques together with considerable skill in using them to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course.

 

C. 4. 60-64%. Fairly Fairly Competent Acceptable level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques together with some skill in using them to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course.

 

D+. 3. 55-59%. Passing Slightly better than minimal knowledge of required concepts and/or techniques together with some ability to use them in satisfying the requirements of an assignment or course.

 

D. 2. 50-54%. Barely Passing Minimum knowledge of concepts and/or techniques needed to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course.

 

E. 1. Marginally Failing

 

F. 0. Failing

 

 

FOCUS, CLARITY, CONSISTENCY AND LOGIC ARE VERY IMPORTANT ELEMENTS

 

ANALYSIS

Comprehension of material/concepts discussed

Application of relevant analysis

Logic, clarity, and consistency of analysis: quality not quantity of paragraphs/ pages

Linking together of theory and application  

 

Weak; superficial depth, missing persuasiveness, descriptive/not analytical counter, ill-informed/ opinions/ journalistic/ (stream of consciousness) not thoughtful etc.

 

Substantiate all arguments raised; defensible position; supportable; thematically arranged; new ideas raised; innovative; courageous; bold; timid; ambitious; too informal; circular; trite\ cliché\ shallow\; how defensible/tenable is the analysis/

 

 

 

SKILL

Accuracy and skill at applying concepts/techniques; thoroughness of application

 

Comprehension of assumptions necessary to render concept/technique/method applicable to problem. Inadequate/ inappropriate use of theory to support argument; unclear theoretical perspective; method inconsistent with theoretical perspective

 

Absence of rationale for theoretical perspective or method

 

CONTENT: quality of arguments:

poorly researched;

current trends and theories short shrifted; appreciation of the literature; related explicitly to the course headings; funnel approach

 

DEVELOPMENT OF ISSUE(S):

Asking the appropriate questions (very important).

Indication of thinking through the thinking process

 

Setting out of main points and central issues (grounding the arguments)

 

Provision of background context and/or history

Integration of course material into development and presentation of argument.

 

Application of “hourglass” shape of development (general-specific-general).

Shape a) general

b) specific

c) general.

 

Circular?  well corroborated, demonstrates critical capacities; clearly stated thesis; levels of articulation; levels of coherence; direction, flow and logical sequencing; too discursive /descriptive; too many issues raised and foci buried; deplete of foci/ ; muddled interpretations/ excessive jargon/ clichés/slogans;  

Is the Main Argument Supported; How so?  What kinds of evidence (empirical?); loses sight of the salient themes

 

Development: unclear logical or thematic development; relation to course material unclear; incomplete/distorted/contradictory argument

 

ISSUE(S) STATEMENT

 Expression of issue(s) and their respective significance.

Identification and explanation of theory/ methods/ policy implications.

Thesis statement focus. (Significance; utility; originality; too general, too much territory; focus; too narrow - insensitive to related issues).

 

 

 

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AP/HREQ 1800 6.00   JUSTICE FOR CHILDREN

Department of Equity Studies

Tuesday, November 28th , 2017

 

TEST #1 : (20%) 

  ESSAY BASED RESPONSES

On the front cover page of your answer booklet please place:

1) your student identification number;

2) your signature;

3) your printed name;

4) name of your Teaching Assistant: 

 

Kirk Atkinson   

Thibault Biscahie

Hazal Ungan Caliskan

Sukaina Dada

Daryoush Ayvazian Kari

Shila Khayambashi          

Sofia Noori

Patricia Robinson

Kat Kai Tam

Onyinyechukwu Udegbe

 

 

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Drawing upon the relevant readings, tutorial discussions and lectures you are asked to respond with clear, consistent and logical analyses, answer only two of the following three questions.

Please note that each answer is worth 10 marks.

Only ONE (1) test booklet is to be used.

ANSWER ONLY TWO (2)   OF THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS 

 

 

 

 

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 Three questions from three different Modules on the test from which you select only two questions

 FROM THESE FOUR MODULES THREE GENERAL QUESTIONS WILL BE CREATED. YOU WILL BE ASKED TO SELECT TWO OF THE THREE ON THE TEST

 

 

 

REVIEW FOUR MODULES

 

1. LECTURE TWO: CONCEPT OF THE CHILD

Sept 19th, 2017

(also relevant: Lecture 9: THE BEHAVIOR OF LAW  Nov 07, 2017)

 

 

2. LECTURE FIVE: THE FAMILY     

Oct 10th, 2017.

 

3. LECTURE SIX:  SCHOOLING

Oct  17th , 2017 

 (also relevant lecture  10. NOVEMBER 14th, 2017 Bullying)

 

4. LECTURE SEVEN: POPULAR CULTURE Oct 24th , 2017.   

(also relevant guest lecture  10. Bullying Nov14th   2017)