DATT 1939
Making Interactive New Media Art
Week 6

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// Skip down to: W6 Lecture Agenda / In Week 6 Lab / To do after week 6 lab... //


   Labs 3-4: w6 labs are on Thurs., Oct. 12
   ** Week 6 Lecture is Wed., Oct. 18 **
   Labs 1-2: w6 labs are on Wed., Oct. 18

In Lecture: A2, Procedural Rhetoric, JavaScript Intro

if they give you ruled paper, write the other way
- Juan Ramón Jiménez (Nobel prize-winning poet)

W6 Announcements:

  • The A1 must be submitted to the server by midnight on the day after your lab this week (week 6) on Oct. 13 (for labs 3 & 4) or Oct. 19 (for labs 1 & 2).

  • If you haven't already, please email your lab leader IF you are taking lateness for A1! Then, after your A1 is done and is up on the server, email them again to let them know they can mark it now.
    See the explanation for how assignment 1 lateness is calculated, if needed.

  • If anyone using PC computers is experiencing issues with the VPN client software, be aware that Frank (the lab technician) cannot troubleshoot this particular aspect of connecting to the server. Any issues getting the VPN client software working should be taken to IT Service Desk (http://itservicedesk.yorku.ca/).
    Once you can successfully establish a VPN connection using the Junos Pulse software, you should be able to log in to the DM server.

  • Are you getting this error? (viewing your A1 through your student work page):
    Forbidden
    You don't have permission to access /web/yourusername/datt1939/a1/ on this server.


    FIX THIS by fixing permissions problems with A1 files/folder WHILE YOU ARE IN LAB. You cannot fix permissions problems from home.

    You need to adjust permissions for things (.html pages, images, .css files) you've put onto the DM server. See the week 5 section of the Resources page


  • The 2nd Moodle quiz is week 7 at the beginning of lab (Oct. 19 for labs 3-4, Oct. 25 for labs 1-2)!

  • In week 6, we are forming A2 groups during labs. Be there, or have little to no say in whether you are designated individual or group for A2!
    If you missed week 6 lab, make sure you get in a group or settle your A2 G/I designation during week 7 lab!

  • Labs 3-4, you need to attend lecture next week, Wed. Oct. 25, but there is no lab next week on Thursday Oct. 26th.


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W6 Lecture Agenda:

  • Tips for Moodle Quiz 2 (which will be at the beginning of your week 7 lab)

  • Full Introduction of Assignment 2: Scripting Play

  • Processes based on Rules/Patterns, creatively expressed and represented:

    (sorting algorithms in dance, displayed in lecture)

  • Relevant Examples: A playful web experience, and a flow-based example of an art-game:



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In Week 6 Lab/Tutorial

  • Consider the Assigned Reading: part of Ian Bogost's "The Rhetoric of Video Games" (PDF)

    You should have read from the beginning to the heading "Ways of Using Procedural Rhetoric: Interrogating Ideology" (This stopping point is on page 12 in your pdf reader software, and on page 128 printed in the PDF chapter itself.)

    Discuss the following:

    • What is Katie Salen and Eric Zimmerman's definition of the term play?

    • "...imposing rules does not suffocate play, but makes it possible in the first place." (bottom of page 120, or 4 in the PDF reader)
      What does this mean? What possibilities come to mind?

    • How does Bogost link procedurality, representation, and play?

    • What does Janet Murray define as the four essential properties of digital artifacts?

    • Building on Murray's properties, what does Bogost state fundamentally separates computers from other media?

    • What is Procedural Rhetoric?

      • Why is it significant?

      • How does it work?

    • What principles from the chapter apply not only to video games but to interactive new media more broadly?

  • A2 Groups

    You have a chance to be designated either I (individual) or G (group) for Assignment 2.

    Each person with an I designation will create an A2 by themselves. People with a G (group) designation will create A2 in a group.
    (Tutorial leaders may use a simple algorithm for a random chance at one of five possible Individual designations, per lab, for A2. )

    To help form the G designations for A2, use the guide below (adjust based on number of students in tutorial without an I designation).

    A2 Groups should ideally consist of 3-4 people:
    (obviously, this does not apply to those with an I designation)

    Lab 1: 26 students
    Lab 2: 28 students
    Lab 3: 30 students
    Lab 4: 29 students

    (Updated Oct. 18, 2017)

    31 students in the lab:
    	31/3 = 10 groups of 3, 1 remainder |  31/4 = 7 groups of 4, 3 remainder
    
    30 students:
    	30/3 = 10 groups of 3              |  30/4 = 7 groups of 4, 2 remainder
    
    29 students:
    	29/3 = 9 groups of 3, 2 remainder  |  29/4 = 7 groups of 4, 1 remainder
    
    28 students:
    	28/3 = 9 groups of 3, 1 remainder  |  28/4 = 7 groups of 4
    
    27 students:
    	27/3 = 9 groups of 3               |  27/4 = 6 groups of 4, 3 remainder
    	
    26 students:
    	26/3 = 8 groups of 3, 2 remainder  |  26/4 = 6 groups of 4, 2 remainder
    	
    25 students:
    	25/3 = 8 groups of 3, 1 remainder  |  25/4 = 6 groups of 4, 1 remainder
    	
    24 students:
    	24/3 = 8 groups of 3               |  24/4 = 6 groups
    	
    23 students:
    	23/3 = 7 groups of 3, 2 remainder  |  23/4 = 5 groups, 3 remainder	
    	
    22 students:
    	22/3 = 7 groups of 3, 1 remainder  |  22/4 = 5 groups, 2 remainder
    
    21 students:
    	21/3 = 7 groups of 3               |  21/4 = 5 groups, 1 remainder
    		
    	
    If your tutorial is not able to come up with the above sizes of groups on your own, your tutorial leader will have to help assign people to groups.

    If you are absent from tutorial, and have not made arrangements with other people in your tutorial to be part of a group with them, you may be assigned to a group by your tutorial leader!

    Write the names of group members in your groups on to the blackboard so your tutorial leader can make a list!

    Each group will soon have its own link on the appropriate student work page...

  • Get to know your Assignment 2 group.
    Read the Group Work Preparation page and do some of the questions, particularly those at the bottom. Share appropriately with your group.

  • Based on considerations coming out of the above, exchange appropriate contact information and potential Assignment 2 work schedule information.


  • Introduction to JavaScript



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To do after week 6 lab...

  • Finish your assignment 1, check that it meets all requirements, post it on the dm server, and check its location through the student work pages.

  • Are you getting this error? (viewing your A1 through your student work page):
    Forbidden
    You don't have permission to access /web/yourusername/datt1939/a1/ on this server.


    FIX THIS by fixing permissions problems with A1 files/folder WHILE YOU ARE IN LAB. You cannot fix permissions problems from home.

    You need to adjust permissions for things (.html pages, images, .css files) you've put onto the DM server. See the week 5 section of the Resources page


  • Plan to attend lectures. Essential concepts for Assignment 2 are discussed in lecture. Many examples of digital art, art games, and games are shown and discussed in lecture. Not to mention the quiz hints.

  • Moodle Quiz 2 in week 7 Tutorials (next week) on 2 Readings:

    1. Sicart - excerpts from Sicart's book Play Matters (find this material on the week 5 page in the class Moodle)

    2. Bogost - Ian Bogost's "The Rhetoric of Video Games" (PDF)
    Before tutorial next week, read the 2nd half of Bogost's article, starting at the heading "Ways of Using Procedural Rhetoric: Interrogating Ideology"

    In preparation for the quiz, here are some questions to consider regarding the second half of the Bogost article: (a little more emphasis will be placed on the first half of the Bogost article compared to the second half)

    • Is the second half of the article mostly making new arguments, or is most of it giving examples and fleshing out arguments already made?

    • Do video games expose ideology intentionally or accidentally? In what ways can they do this?

    • Is procedural rhetoric found in commercial video games?

    • Consider this quotation:
      "While a book might make [its] argument by explaining the process, in Spore the player discovers the argument by playing in the possibility space the game's rules create. This act of discovering a procedural argument through play is endemic to procedural rhetoric." (135-6)
      How does the last sentence relate to possibilities for the Assignment 2 in this course?

    • Consider the following changes, and potential relationships between Bogost's ideas and interactive new media art:
      "As we evolve our relationship with video games interactive new media art pieces, one of the most important steps we can take is to learn to play engage with them critically, to suss out the meaning they carry, both on and under the surface. To do this requires a fluency in procedurality, the core representational form of computing. But programming or using computers is not the sole answer to such a charge. Rather, we need to play video games with interactive new media art pieces in order to understand the possibility spaces their rules create, and then to explore those possibility spaces and accept, challenge, or reject them in our daily lives." (137)

  • Achieve or surpass the Minimum code/skills for week 6!


  • Practice making random JavaScript links from the week 6 section of the Resources page. Can you use any other kind of JavaScript if statement with that random link, instead of the exact kind of if statement in the original example?


  • Look ahead to other JavaScript skills on the Resources page, and potentially try other JavaScript examples.


  • Remember to practice new technical skills at least 3 times a week so that you are able to build on those technical skills with new material next week.


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Updated Oct. 11, 2017.


FA/DATT 1939 3.0 Making Interactive New Media Art Fall 2017
is a course offered through:
The Department of Computational Arts
The School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design (AMPD)
York University (Toronto ON, Canada)