Redefine the possible.
space Future students Current students Faculty & staff Alumni Visitors York crest
rule

York Centre for Asian Research Update            Issue 7, March 21 2005


In this Issue
 
Today @ YCAR: Music and Its Experiences in Asia - by Nur Intan Murtadza and Jeffrey Cupchik
International Conference: E-Business and Opportunities for Women in Asia-Pacific 
Programs and Scholarships: Canada Corps University Partnership Program
Postgraduate Fund Awards: Research Assistance, Language Training and Studies in Non-Violence
Publication Sale: Coping with Globalization - Southeast Asian Historical and Cultural Heritage
Asia Job Postings: Tenure-Track Positions in International Relations and Comparative Politics at NUS
Asia Op-Ed: Does China need a law to wage war with Taipei? by Ku Er-teh, Taipei Times

Today @ YCAR: Music and its experiences in Asia by Nur Intan Murtadza & Jeffrey W. Cupchik

Monday, March 21, 2005, 2:30-4:30 p.m., 270B York Lanes, Keele Campus, York University

Nur Intan Murtadza:  Sacred sounds: The discourse and literature on "pusaka" and the Javanese gamelan

Musical instruments, throughout the world, come to have meanings associated with them that far surpass our understanding of them as sound producing objects made of wood, metal or clay. Their use in ritual and dramatic performances brings them into association with whatever ideas concerning man and the sacred are suggested by these performance contexts. In lowland Southeast Asia, gamelan ensembles have been historically associated with rituals and important ceremonies. The presentation will focus on the discourse and literature surrounding gamelan as pusaka, instruments that in Javanese cosmology, are believed to be sacred and to have magical power or mystical influence.

Jeffrey W. Cupchik:  (Dis/)Embodied Ethics and Intersubjectivity:  The Transcultural Translation and Practice of the Tibetan Buddhist "Chod" Ritual


Although Buddhist traditions are generally understood to have originated in India and to have been subsequently disseminated throughout Asia (and the West), historians regard the "chod" ritual as unique since it is the only Vajrayana tradition to have been developed in Tibet first and then taught in India.   The "chod" ritual became well known for its radical ethics and method:  utilising one's own body, and all one's psychophysical constituents as mentally transformed, as the means for practicing boddhicitta.  Due to the "chod" method being highly efficacious, the practice had immense appeal for both Mahayana lay and monastic practitioners. The practice was thought to have been dying out, yet currently there is evidence of revived interest in the "chod" practice globally.


International Conference: “Expanding Women’s Business Opportunities Through the Internet”, Seminar on "E-Business and Opportunities for Women in Asia-Pacific”, sponsored by APWINC, BPW Thailand, and UNESCAP, Bangkok Thailand, March 28-30, 2005

With the fast-evolving information and communication technologies of the 21st century, the needs for promoting women's participation in the information society and its growing e-business opportunities are ever more apparent. Women's participation in digital economy will contribute greatly to the national and global economy, and will also lead to the promotion of gender equality. In this context, ICT and e-business capacity development for women are crucial, so as the reassessment of the existing policy frame work from a gender perspective. 

The Seminar is a collaborative effort of the Asian Pacific Women's Information Network Center (APWINC), Seoul, Republic of Korea, the Business and Professional Women (BPW) International, and the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP), and is being organized as part of a project funded by the APEC Education Foundation.

The Seminar will bring together policy-makers, e-business experts and women CEOs to examine the current status, best practices and future directions of e-business. It will provide an important opportunity for policy-makers and women CEOs to share information and strategies on further developing e-business environment. Dr. Lorna Wright, YCAR Executive Committee Member and Director of the Schulich School of Business International MBA Program is attending this international conference.

For more information, visit the APWINC website at http://www.women.or.kr/.


Programs and Scholarships: Canada Corps University Partnership Program

Financed by the Canadian International Development Agency, Canada Corps is a way for Canadians to work together to promote good governance and institution-building in developing countries. The pilot phase of the Canada Corps University Partnership Program (CCUPP), managed by AUCC, allows young people, who are still engaged in formal learning, to better understand governance challenges in developing countries and to participate with more experienced mentors in the search for solutions. Thus, the pilot phase of the Canada Corps University Partnership Program helps foster a new generation of Canadians committed to applying our country’s values and expertise to help build a safer, more prosperous and more democratic world. See link below for detailed guidelines.

Complete guidelines and applications materials are available on the Canada Corps website: http://www.aucc.ca/programs/intprograms/canadacorps_e.html.

Guidelines and related forms

Contact Isabelle Légaré at canadacorps@aucc.ca, (613) 563-3961 ext. 303, if you any questions about the guidelines and forms.


Postgraduate Fund Awards: Research Assistance, Language Training and Studies in Non-Violence

Post-Graduate Research Assistance Fund

This competition is open to York University doctoral candidates and Post-doctoral researchers in their field or doctoral dissertation research. The PGRAF has an annual fund of $6,000.00 and awards are made up to a maximum of $3,000.00 (with the total of the award not to exceed 75% of overall costs), with the most common award level falling in the $1,000.00 range per applicant (annually) in support of field research. Eligible are Post-doctoral researchers and those Ph.D candidates who will have completed their Ph.D course work, qualifying exams, and proposal (where required), prior to taking up the award, and who are engaged in field or doctoral dissertation research consistent with one of the research themes of the Centre: (i) Strategic Studies; (ii) Political Economy of Security; (iii) Regional Conflict; and (iv) Non-Traditional Analyses of Conflict and Security.

Language Training Fund

The York Centre for International and Security Studies Language Training Fund provides financial support to York doctoral candidates that require specialized language training for their dissertation research. Three awards of up to $1,000.00 are available annually. To be eligible for funding, proposed dissertation research must fall within one of the research themes of the Centre: (i) Strategic Studies; (ii) Political Economy of Security; (iii) Regional Conflict; and (iv) Non-Traditional Analyses of Conflict and Security.

The Martin Cohnstaedt Graduate Research Award for Studies in Non-Violence

The Martin Cohnstaedt Graduate Research Award for Studies in Non-Violence is open to all full or part-time Canadian and International doctoral and master's candidates engaged in researching some aspect of pacifism or non-violence (biographical, historical, international, philosophical, political, religious, social action, etc., or some combination of the above). The awards are open to graduate students whose research work is associated with one or more Organized Research Units at York University, for example, but not limited to, the Centre for International and Security Studies, the Canadian Centre for German and European Studies, the Centre for Jewish Studies, the Centre for Refugee Studies, the LaMarsh Centre for Research on Violence and Conflict Resolution, and the Nathanson Centre for the Study of Organized Crime and Corruption. The award has an annual fund of $2,500.00 and awards are made up to a maximum of $2,500.00 (with the total of the award not to exceed 75% of overall costs), with the most common award level falling in the $1,000.00 range per applicant (annually). All applicants must submit a statement of research, a letter of reference from their academic supervisor, an up to date copy of their CV, and a detailed project budget. Eligible costs are research project consumables (on a cost reimbursable basis) such as: travel, meals, accommodation, photocopying, etc. No equipment, capital, or salary costs.


Applications for these funds are available on the YCISS website at www.yorku.ca/yciss/. Completed applications should be submitted electronically to Joan Broussard (joanb@yorku.ca) on or before Thursday, 14 April 2005. For more information about the competition, please contact Joan Broussard, Administrative Officer by (phone) 736-5156, (fax) 736-5752, or (email) joanb@yorku.ca.


Publication Sale: Coping with Globalization: Southeast Asian Historical and Cultural Heritage
Edited by Rodolphe De Koninck and Bruno Thibert
 
This is the proceedings of the CCSEAS Conference held at the University of Montreal on October 10-12, 2003 and published in September 2004.The publication contains 6 articles on the following topics of interests written by various authors:
The publication is available at YCAR for $5.00. For those interested in procuring a copy, contact ycar@yorku.ca. 

Asia Job Postings: Tenure-Track Positions for International Relations and Comparative Politics at NUS

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

The Department of Political Science, National University of Singapore, invites applications for a tenure-track position for a specialist on International Relations at the Assistant Professor level. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in Political Science and the ability to teach Theories of International Relations to undergraduate and graduate students. An interest in teaching American Politics and Foreign Policy, International Politics of East or Southeast Asia would be an added advantage. The successful candidate should expect to join the Department in July/August 2005. Salaries and benefits are internationally competitive. In addition to the basic salary which is equivalent to that offered by most US Universities, there are other monetary benefits such as performance bonus, special payment for foreign staff scheme, educational allowance for children and highly subsidized housing. Applications must include: 1.) covering letter describing teaching and research interests; 2.) complete CV; 3.) names of three referees and their recommendation letters; 4.) sample publications; 5.) syllabi of courses taught; 6.) teaching evaluation records; 7.) transcripts of courses/modules taken for graduate programme. Review of applications will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled. The deadline for sending applications is 31 March 2005. All applications and queries should be sent to: Associate Professor Lee Lai To, Head, Department of Political Science, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260; Tel: (65) 6874-3970; Fax: (65) 6779-6815; E-Mail: polteomw@nus.edu.sg.


COMPARATIVE POLITICS

The Department of Political Science, National University of Singapore, invites applications for a tenure-track position for a specialist on Comparative Politics at the Assistant Professor level. Preference will be given to candidates with a specialization on Southeast Asian politics. Some expertise in Political Islam, though not prerequisite, will be an advantage. Applicants must have Ph.D. in Political Science from a good university and ability to teach Southeast Asian Politics to undergraduate and graduate students. Successful candidate should expect to join Department in July/August 2005. Salaries and benefits are internationally competitive. In addition to basic salary which is equivalent to that offered by most US Universities, there are other monetary benefits such as performance bonus, special payment for foreign staff scheme, educational allowance for children and highly subsidized housing. Opportunities for research and publications are also widely available to staff and library facilities relating to Southeast Asia are among the best in the world. Applications must include: 1.) covering letter describing teaching and research interests; 2.) complete CV; 3.) names of three referees and their recommendation letters; 4.) sample publications; 5.) syllabi of courses taught; 6.) teaching evaluation records; 7.) transcripts of courses/ modules taken for graduate programme. Review of applications begins immediately and continues until position is filled. Deadline for sending applications is 31 March 2005. All applications/queries should be sent to: Associate Professor Lee Lai To, Head, Department of Political Science, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260; Tel: (65) 6874-3970; Fax: (65) 6779-6815; E-Mail: polteomw@nus.edu.sg.


DOMESTIC POLITICS in NORTHEAST ASIA

The Australian National University, Research School of Asian and Pacific Studies, Department of Political and Social Change invites applications for Research Fellow/Fellow, Academic Level B or C, Salary Range: A$59,420-82,931 pa plus 17% super, Reference: PA2757. The Department is seeking a scholar to research domestic politics in Northeast Asia (China, Japan, North Korea, South Korea, or Taiwan), supervise Ph.D. students, undertake graduate teaching, and contribute to the Department's development. You will have a Ph.D. in political science (or closely related discipline); considerable research experience in, and publications on, at least one Northeast Asian country's politics, knowledge of relevant language(s) for research purposes; a research agenda compatible with the Department's interests; and a demonstrable interest in comparative politics. This is a standard (continuing)/tenurable appointment. Selection Criteria: http://info.anu.edu.au/hr/jobs/ or from Human Resources (Academic), RSPAS, Tel: (61 2) 6125-4444; E-Mail: hr.rspas@anu.edu.au. Enquiries: Prof. Ben Kerkvliet, Tel: (61 2) 6125-4790; E-Mail: ben.kerkvliet@anu.edu.au, or beverley.fraser@anu.edu.au (61 2) 6125-4790. Closing Date: 31 May 2005.

For more job Asia job postings, visit the Association for Asian Studies website at: http://www.aasianst.org/employment/main.htm.


Asia Op-Ed: Does China need a law to wage war on Taiwan? By Ku Er-teh 顧爾德, Taipei Times, Taiwan, Friday, Mar 18, 2005,Page 8

China's "Anti-Secession" Law clearly states that in the event that the "Taiwan independence" forces act under any name or by any means to cause Taiwan's secession from China, that major incidents entailing Taiwan's secession from China occur, or that conditions for a peaceful reunification should be completely exhausted, Beijing shall employ non-peaceful means and other necessary measures to protect China's sovereignty and territorial integrity.

These three preconditions represent Beijing's consistent stance. The official document that most clearly stated the preconditions for waging war against Taiwan prior to the Anti-Secession Law is the white paper released by China's Taiwan Affairs Office in 2000.

The Anti-Secession Law, however, takes a softer approach. The white paper listed "indefinitely refusing to negotiate" as a pre-condition for war, while the Anti-Secession Law states that war only becomes unavoidable when conditions for a peaceful reunification are completely exhausted. The major difference is that the Anti-Secession Law is a law, while the white paper is just a policy document. Since Taipei-Washington relations are regulated by the US' Taiwan Relations Act, Beijing also wants a domestic law to regulate political relations across the Taiwan Strait.

The Anti-Secession Law provides Beijing with a legal basis for waging war. However, the preface chapter of the Constitution of the People's Republic of China (PRC) already clearly stipulates that Taiwan is part of the sacred territory of the PRC. What's more, does China, with its undemocratic, autocratic regime, really care about a "legal basis?"

Another white paper on Taiwan was issued during the Jiang Zemin (江澤民) era. It listed all the pre-conditions for waging war against Taiwan, yet China at that point was still militarily unable to punish Taiwanese independence forces, which was humiliating to China's leadership. Beijing has to understand that to take Taiwan by force, it has to deal with other international superpowers.

Though Taipei has reacted fiercely to the law, it is still focusing on the domestic political repercussions. Premier Frank Hsieh ( 謝長廷 ) has said that if Beijing enacts a law to take Taiwan by force, he would support amending the Constitution to counter the legislation.

Instead of stressing the legal basis for the Anti-Secession Law, we can see the law as one of Chinese President Hu Jintao's (胡錦濤) strategies on Taiwan -- employing a legal basis to oppose Taiwan's legal "secession."

What we need to take note of is that on March 4, Hu spoke of his four-point guideline on Taiwan in response to President Chen Shui-bian's ( 陳水扁 ) "four noes and one not." This is very different from Jiang's "listen to what [Chen] says and observe what he does" policy.

If Hu's new four-point guideline is taken together with the Anti-Secession Law and US-Japan Security Treaty, what looms ahead of Taiwan is very clear: The US and China prevent Taiwan from claiming independence, the US and Japan work together to stop China taking Taiwan by force, and the US pushes both sides to negotiate.

Hu's remarks revealed that Chen's "four noes and one not" is the bottom line acceptable to both sides, and that he expects Chen to conform to the "one China" principle.

In response to the Taiwan Solidarity Union's recent criticism, the Democratic Progressive Party is sure to condemn the Chinese Communist Party. To the outside world, however, it is more important that they get Beijing to accept, legally, a more ambiguous definition of "one China" (by amending the preface to Taiwan's Constitution, for example), to transcend Beijing's existing constitutional structure, and gain a high degree of autonomy and freedom on the international scene.

Ku Er-teh is a freelance writer. Translated by Daniel Cheng.


York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR). For further information, contact ycar@yorku.ca. Ste. 270 York Lanes, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto ON  M3J 1P3. URL: www.yorku.ca/ycar.