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Call for Papers Networks & Neighbours — Cultural Capital

Mar 31, 2014

Call for Papers Networks & Neighbours Vol. 2.2: Cultural Capital.

The July 2014 issue of Networks and Neighbours will be dedicated to exploring the concept of 'Cultural Capital' as an idea, philosophy, and method of doing early medieval history.

Since the idea was first proposed by Pierre Bourdieu and Jean–Claude Passeron, 'Cultural Capital' has broadened the way researchers of the modern world consider the meanings of 'wealth', 'power' and their relationship to real 'capital'. The idea is no less relevant to the study of the Early Middle Ages. For this issue, we are seeking papers which investigate the literature and material goods of Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages; the polemics and the paintings, the buildings, coins, jewelry, topoi, prejudices, languages, dress, songs, and hairstyles that framed the early medieval world(s), and consider them in terms of 'Cultural Capital'.

For example, what relation did Charlemagne's moustache, his penchant for Augustine, and an elephant called Abul–Abbas have to his success as emperor? How did Rome become so central to the European imagination, even as its military and economic relevance waned? What role, if any, do Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages have in both the modern 'European' debate and the question of Scottish independence? Other issues to consider include: what constituted Cultural Capital in the Early Middle Ages, and why does it matter? Who created, exchanged, brokered, and consumed Cultural Capital? How did it translate into economic, symbolic, and social capital? And was Cultural Capital a force for social change, or inertia?

These are not meant to be prescriptive suggestions, and we welcome submissions which question, develop, or reject altogether Bourdieu's approach. We also welcome submissions on any other aspect of Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages, which fit the overall notion of Networks and Neighbours.

Prospective articles should be in the range of 5,000–8,000 words (excluding footnotes), prepared for blind review, and accompanied by an abstract of approximately 250 words. Abstracts for proposed articles should be received by 31st March 2014, with full papers to be submitted by 30th April 2014. We also warmly welcome book reviews as well as reports from conferences, exhibitions, masterclasses and other relevant events.

Further guidelines for formatting and online submission can be found at: networksandneighbours.org.

As always, Networks and Neighbours will accept articles in any modern language, although an English abstract is required for all submissions.

If you have any questions please contact us at: networksandneighbours@gmail.com.


Web Sitehttp://networksandneighbours.org
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