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Equivalence Testing: Where itís Been, Where itís At and, Most Importantly, Where itís Going

Dec 2, 2013, 10:15am-11:45am

Equivalence testing emerged in psychology around the mid-1990s as a method for detecting a lack of relationship among variables, even though the method has been popular in other fields (e.g. biopharmacology) for decades. To date, numerous tests have been developed for detecting the equivalence of independent means, a lack of correlation, the similarity of independent regression and correlation coefficients etc. However, there are still numerous possibilities for expanding the field to be able to test a wider a range of equivalence-based hypotheses.

This talk will highlight current research on the multiplicity problem for one-way designs, one-way repeated measures designs and negligible interaction, in addition to proposing other possibilities for moving the field forward.

Suggested readings: Rogers, J. L, Howard, K. I., & Vessey, J. T. (1993). Using significance tests to evaluate equivalence between two experimental groups. Psychological Bulletin, Vol 113(3), 553-565. Tryon, Warren W. (2001). Evaluating statistical difference, equivalence, and indeterminacy using inferential confidence intervals: An integrated alternative method of conducting null hypothesis statistical tests. Psychological Methods, Vol 6(4), 371-386.


Location:Norm Endler Seminar Room, 164 Behavioural Sciences Building (BSB)
Posted by:Jolynn Pek
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