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Alumni Spotlight: Paul Saguil (BA ’04, LLB ’07)

Alumni Spotlight: Paul Saguil (BA ’04, LLB ’07)

Paul Saguil

Paul Saguil’s (BA ’04, LLB ’07) journey since graduating from York University has been an impactful one. As a graduate of Osgoode Law School, he is fighting financial crime and combating corruption worldwide as Deputy Head of Global Sanctions Compliance/Anti-Bribery Program at TD Bank. 

“Going to Osgoode Law School was an easy decision. It's one of the best law schools in the world, not just in the country, but around the world! Attending a world-renowned law school was a no brainer. I had a great experience and met some amazing people with whom I’m still in touch,” says Paul. 

He’s defended equality and human rights before the Supreme Court of Canada and regularly demonstrates his passion for mentoring and volunteerism, including his leadership role at the 519 Community Centre – a City of Toronto charitable, non-profit organization in the Church and Wellesley neighbourhood in Toronto. Paul served on the board for seven years and as chair for the last two years.   

“I’m trying, in my own way, to foster a more inclusive society and more inclusive economy. I want to make sure that nobody's left behind. Whatever life throws at me, I'm ready for it. And that’s in part due to my York education. My mindset is that there's always more work to do to make our country and our city more inclusive. And I hope to be part of that change.” 

— Paul Saguil (BA ’04, LLB ’07)

“It's one of the greatest legacies of my career. My involvement with the 519 started because I was looking for a place where people could find community. That's sort of indirectly what I would say ties all my stories together,” says Paul. “I’m trying, in my own way, to foster a more inclusive society and more inclusive economy. I want to make sure that nobody's left behind. Whatever life throws at me, I'm ready for it. And that’s in part due to my York education. My mindset is that there's always more work to do to make our country and our city more inclusive. And I hope to be part of that change.” 

When reminiscing about his time at York, Paul recalls Professor Michael Gilbert, a life-long cross dresser and an activist in the international transgender community.  

“Professor Gilbert, one of my referees for law school, made such an impression on me because they taught me critical argumentation theory, but also they were the first non-gender conforming person that I had in my life. I didn't realize how much of an impact that would have on me later on.” 

Paul’s demonstrated passion and long-standing commitment to equity for vulnerable communities through a career dedicated to volunteerism and public service stems, in part, from being a proud gay Filipino-Canadian who understands firsthand the journey of so many marginalized people. 

“I was involved in mentorship programs at York, both at the undergrad level but also at the law school level,” he says. “I continue to do what I can to support recruitment activities and particularly initiatives focused on diversity and inclusion. I was just there for the Rainbow Grad Celebration event. I know that's a relatively new initiative from Alumni Engagement and I think it's fantastic! Reaching out to queer students and fostering those relationships while students are in school is so important.”