Skip to main content Skip to local navigation

Overchoice and assortment type: when and why variety backfires

Overchoice and assortment type: when and why variety backfires

“In particular, we find the overchoice effect is driven both by “cognitive overload” (Study 2) and the “anticipation of regret” (Study 3). In turn, we find that simplifying the information presentation and reducing the potential for regret moderate the negative impact of nonalignability.” (p.393)

Gourville, J. T., & Soman, D. (2005). Overchoice and assortment type: when and why variety backfires. Marketing Science, 24(3), 382–395.

Resource Theme(s): Developing capstone curriculum to enhance student achievement, Understanding student autonomy to enhance student achievement

Categories: