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When choice motivates and when it does not

When choice motivates and when it does not

“Therefore, when offering choices, teachers should construct options that meet their students’ needs. In particular, options should be constructed that are relevant to students’ interests and goals (autonomy support), are not too numerous or complex yet not too easy (competence support), and are congruent with the values of the students’ families and culture of origin (relatedness support). It is also important that these choices be offered in a manner and context that meets students’ needs, or at least does not threaten those needs.” (p.439)

Katz, I., & Assor, A. (2006). When choice motivates and when it does not. Educational Psychology Review, 19(4), 429–442

Resource Theme(s): Developing capstone curriculum to enhance student achievement, Understanding student autonomy to enhance student achievement

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