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Global Health Seminar Series - Leveraging Artificial Intelligence to predict and forecast the transmission of COVID-19 with Dr. Jude Kong

31 March 2021 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

This week Dr. Jude Kong, Assistant Professor in the Mathematics & Statistics department at York University, will be presenting on "Leveraging Artificial Intelligence to  predict  and forecast the transmission of COVID-19 and optimize vaccination roll-out in Africa".

During different phases of the COVID-19 pandemic, real-time delivery of reliable and comprehensive information is critical to predict spread and impact, and to guide governmental strategic policies and best practice.  To this end,  the  Africa-Canada Artificial Intelligence and Data Innovation Consortium (ACADIC),  is currently developing and employing artificial intelligence to predict and forecast the transmission of COVID-19 in Africa as well as design vaccination strategies to help keep the number of COVID-19 cases requiring hospital care below the maximum hospital capacity and maximize the impacts of available supply of vaccines. In this talk,  I will share the work that ACADIC (with the support of the IDRC)  is currently doing in  Botswana, Cameroon, Eswatini, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda,  South Africa,  and Zimbabwe to  support decision-making for real-time management of COVID-19 spread.

Dr. Jude Kong is an Assistant Professor in the Mathematics & Statistics department at York University. He is a member of the Canadian Black Scientist Network, the Canadian Center for Disease Modelling, Canada's COVID-19 Modelling Task Force and CDC Africa COVID-19 Modelling team. Additionally, Dr. Kong leads the Africa-Canada Artificial Intelligence and Data Innovation Consortium.  He is an expert in Artificial Intelligence, infectious disease modelling and population dynamics. His  principal research objective is to use mathematical/statistical modelling to study the dynamics of infectious disease and the impact of environmental stressors on species distribution.

RSVP