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ANTH 1120 6.0: MAKING SENSE OF A CHANGING WORLD: ANTHROPOLOGY TODAY

ANTH 1120 6.0: MAKING SENSE OF A CHANGING WORLD: ANTHROPOLOGY TODAY

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AP/ANTH 1120 6.00

MAKING SENSE OF A CHANGING WORLD: ANTHROPOLOGY TODAY

SECTION A

Course Director: TBA

In this course you will use anthropological approaches to increase your understanding of global issues in diverse locales. This course challenges you to engage with other ways of knowing and being, and to rethink your taken-for-granted knowledge and beliefs through the comparative analysis of the human condition. This course will take a problem-based approach to a range of topics such as: the effects of race and racism, sources of religious conflict, alternate genders and sexualities, First Nations and health, international development and issues of social inequality. Students are encouraged to bring their own knowledge and experience as the first step in "thinking like an anthropologist" (i.e. rethinking the taken-for-granted). The emphasis in this course is developing skills (analytical thinking, reading, writing).

SECTION B

Course Director: Prof. R. James - ryan_kj@yorku.ca

This course is an introduction to sociocultural anthropology.

Sociocultural anthropology is a social science that specializes in the study of culture.

According to our textbook, culture is a “system of meaning” shared by a group of people. It is “usually an un-conscious, taken-for-granted-reality”, and it includes “the standards ofvalue through which action is judged” (Kenny & Smillie 2017, 4). There is a lot more to“culture” than just this definition, but this is a good start.

In this course, we will use the concept of culture and the methods of anthropology to understand and explore a variety of crucial questions and problems. We will do this through local-level case studies, both familiar and unfamiliar. This will involve learning about and appreciating different systems of meaning. 

To do this effectively, we will need to consider the limits of our own knowledge and challenge our own ways of thinking about the world. In the process, we will sharpen our critical and analytical skills, and develop a working skill-set for university-level research, writing, and discussion.

SECTION C

Course Director: Prof. L. Ameeriar - lalaie@yorku.ca

In this course you will use anthropological approaches to increase your understanding of global issues in diverse locales. This course challenges you to engage with other ways of knowing and being, and to rethink your taken-for-granted knowledge and beliefs through the comparative analysis of the human condition. This course will take a problem-based approach to a range of topics such as: the effects of race and racism, sources of religious conflict, alternate genders and sexualities, First Nations and health, international development and issues of social inequality. Students are encouraged to bring their own knowledge and experience as the first step in "thinking like an anthropologist" (i.e. rethinking the taken-for-granted). The emphasis in this course is developing skills (analytical thinking, reading, writing).

SECTION D

Course Director: Prof. D. Winland - winland@yorku.ca

In this course you will use anthropological approaches to increase your understanding of global issues in diverse locales. This course challenges you to engage with other ways of knowing and being, and to rethink your taken-for-granted knowledge and beliefs through the comparative analysis of the human condition. This course will take a problem-based approach to a range of topics such as: the effects of race and racism, sources of religious conflict, alternate genders and sexualities, First Nations and health, international development and issues of social inequality. Students are encouraged to bring their own knowledge and experience as the first step in "thinking like an anthropologist" (i.e. rethinking the taken-for-granted). The emphasis in this course is developing skills (analytical thinking, reading, writing).

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