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ANTH 2220 3.0: FROM SETTLER COLONIALISM TO MULTICULTURALISM - AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL APPROACH

ANTH 2220 3.0: FROM SETTLER COLONIALISM TO MULTICULTURALISM - AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL APPROACH

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AP/ANTH 2220 3.00

FROM SETTLER COLONIALISM TO MULTICULTURALISM - AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL APPROACH

Course Director: TBD

How do we live and interact with others in multicultural and multiracial societies?  What is the relationship between settler colonialism and multiculturalism?  Who is a settler? This course is a critical study of settler colonialism, diversity, and multiculturalism by attending to: (a) the politics of elimination, assimilation and recognition of Indigenous presence; (b) settler colonial institutions, ideologies and practices that have endorsed and validated racialized and social hierarchies in Canada and in other settler states across the globe, and (c) historical and contemporary interactions between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people and how such interactions challenge settler and colonial epistemologies.  To accomplish the aims of this course, we will draw upon studies that critique celebratory perspectives of multiculturalism to identify emerging forms of knowledges and practices that interrogate multicultural values of recognition, tolerance and welcome, thus offering alternative modes for interacting with ‘strangers’. This course offers an in-depth analysis of Canada through ethnographic accounts of: settler acts of dispossession of Black, Indigenous and racialized communities; redress and reconciliation; heritage-making and nationalism, and religious diversity and solidarities.  We will also consider other ideas and forms for living multiculturally, such as conviviality and cosmopolitanism, co-existence (kyosei) in Japan, superdiversity in Europe, and recent studies on human-nonhuman relationships.

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