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1st Year Courses

 

MATH 1013 3.00 FW

Applied Calculus I

Calendar copy: Introduction to the theory and applications of both differential and integral calculus. Limits. Derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Riemann sums, definite integrals and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Logarithms and exponentials, Extreme value problems, Related rates, Areas and Volumes. Prerequisite: SC/MATH 1515 3.00 or SC/MATH 1520 3.00, or a high school calculus course. Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1000 3.00, SC/MATH 1300 3.00, SC/MATH 1505 6.00, SC/MATH 1530 3.00, SC/MATH 1550 6.00, SC/ISCI 1401 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1930 3.00, AP/ECON 1530 3.00.

Note: MATH 1013 3.00 is a prerequisite for MATH 1014 3.00 and MATH 1310 3.00.

Biology and Kinesiology students are advised to consider carefully whether they should be taking MATH 1013/1014 or MATH 1505. Seek advice before enrolling if you are uncertain.

Anyone majoring in a Mathematics and Statistics program should take MATH 1300 3.00 instead of MATH 1013 3.00.

The text will be J. Stewart, Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 8th ed.

Coordinator: A. Skelton (askelton@yorku.ca)

 

 

MATH 1014 3.00 FW 

Applied Calculus II  

Calendar copy: Calculus in Polar Coordinates. Techniques of Integration. Indeterminate Forms. Improper Integrals. Sequences, infinite series and power series. Approximations. Introduction to ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite(s): One of SC/MATH 1013 3.00; SC/MATH 1300 3.00, for nonscience students only, six credits from SC/MATH 1530 3.00 and SC/MATH 1540 3.00, SC/MAT 1550 6.00, AP/ECON 1540 3.00. Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1310 3.00, SC/MATH 1505 6.00, SC/ISCI 1402 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1940 3.00.  

Note: MATH 1014 3.00 is a prerequisite for MATH 2015 3.00, MATH 2030 3.00, MATH 2041 3.00, MATH 2280 3.00, MATH 2310 3.00, MATH 2930 3.00 and MATH 3241 3.00.  

This course is a sequel to MATH 1013, and will use the same textbook. 

Coordinator: A. Skelton (askelton@yorku.ca) 

 

EECS/MATH 1019 3.00 FW 

Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science  

Calendar copy: Introduction to abstraction. Use and development of precise formulations of mathematical ideas. Informal introduction to logic; introduction to naïve set theory; induction; relations and functions; big Onotation; recursive definitions, recurrence relations and their solutions; graphs and trees. Three lecture hours per week. Plus dropin optional problem sessions as well as instructor office hours, as these are announced in each term. Prerequisites: SC/MATH 1190 3.00, or two 4U Math courses, including MHF4U (Advanced Function). Course credit exclusion: SC/MATH 2320 3.00, SC/EECS/MATH 1028 3.00.  

Note: MATH 1019 3.00 is a prerequisite for MATH 1090 3.00 and MATH 3021 3.00.  

The curriculum is an introduction to basic ideas and methods in Discrete Mathematics. There will be a short review of concepts from formal logic and the idea of a mathematical proof (including mathematical induction). Sets and functions will be covered, including the growth of functions and BigOh notation. The second half of the course will be devoted to recursion and introductory methods in counting, including the pigeonhole principle, and the solution of linear recurrences. 

 

 

MATH 1021 3.00 FW 

Linear Algebra I  

Calendar copy: Linear equations, matrices, Gaussian elimination, determinants and vector spaces. This course covers material similar to that in SC/MATH 2221 3.00 but at a more advanced level. Required in Specialized Honours statistics and in all applied mathematics, mathematics and mathematics for commerce programs except the BA Program in Mathematics for Commerce. Prerequisite: One 12U or OAC mathematics course or equivalent. Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1025 3.00, SC/MATH 2021 3.00, SC/MATH 2221 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 2650 3.00.  

Note: MATH 1021 3.00 is a prerequisite for MATH 2022 3.00, MATH 2200 3.00, MATH 2270 3.00, MATH 3141 3.00, MATH 3171 3.00, MATH 3172 3.00, MATH 3241 3.00, MATH 3330 3.00 and MATH 4171 3.00.  

Note: MATH 1540 3.00 may not be taken for credit by anyone taking, or anyone who has passed, MATH 1021.  

After the concepts in logic and set theory, the most fundamental idea in all of mathematics is that of a function. The simplest type of function is a linear function, and linear functions (also called linear transformations) are what linear algebra is about. Thus, linear algebra is mathematically more basic than, for instance, differential calculus, where more complicated functions are approximate (d locally by linear ones. Apart from underpinning much of mathematics, linear algebra has a vast range of applications — from quantum mechanics to computer graphics to business and industry (via statistics and linear programming). 

Additional topics: Euclidean nspace, lines and planes, linear transformations from Rn to Rm, abstract vector spaces, basis and dimension, rank and nullity of a matrix. 

The text has not been chosen yet. 

 

 

MATH 1025 3.00 FW 

Applied Linear Algebra  

Calendar copy: Topics include spherical and cylindrical coordinates in Euclidean 3space, general matrix algebra, determinants, vector space concepts for Euclidean nspace (e.g. linear dependence and independence, basis, dimension, linear transformations etc.), an introduction to eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Prerequisites: One 12U or OAC mathematics course or equivalent. Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1021 3.00, SC/MATH 2021 3.00, SC/MATH 2221 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 2650 3.00.  

Note: MATH 1025 3.00 is a prerequisite for MATH 2270 3.00, MATH 2271 3000, MATH 2930 3.00, MATH 3141 3.00, MATH 3171 3.00, MATH 3241 3.00, MATH 3330 3.00 and MATH 4171 3.00.  

Note: MATH 1540 3.00 may not be taken for credit by anyone taking, or anyone who has passed, MATH 1025.  

MATH 1025 3.00 gives a one-term intensive introduction to linear algebra, with emphasis on its applications. This course is particularly appropriate for students taking Science or Engineering programs which require one term’s worth of linear algebra. 

The text will be K. Kuttler, A First Course in Linear Algebra (available as a free download). 

 

 

MATH 1028 3.00 W 

Discrete Math for Engineering  

Calendar Copy: Introduction to discrete mathematics for engineering disciplines, including an introduction to propositional logic and application to switching circuits; sets, relations and functions; predicate logic and proof techniques; induction with applications to program correctness; basic counting techniques with applications; graphs and trees with applications in circuit analysis, information storage and retrieval, Huffman coding; automata and applications in software engineering. Three lecture hours and two hours of mandatory tutorials per week. Prerequisites: MHF4U and MCV4U. Course Credit Exclusions: LE/SC/EECS 1019 3.0, SC/MATH 1019 3.00, SC/MATH 2320 3.00. 

 

 

MATH 1090 3.00 FW 

Introduction to Logic for Computer Science  

Calendar copy: The syntax and semantics of propositional and predicate logic. Applications to program specification and verification. Optional topics include set theory and induction using the formal logical language of the first part of the course. Prerequisite: SC/MATH 1190 3.00 or SC/MATH 1019 3.00. Note: This course may not be taken for degree credit by any student who has passed SC/MATH 4290 3.00.  

Note: MATH 1090 3.00 is a prerequisite for MATH 2320 3.00.  

By taking this course, students will be able to master the syntax and proof techniques of propositional and predicate logic, as well as their informal semantics. The proper understanding of propositional logic is fundamental to all levels of computer programming, even the most basic, while the ability to correctly use variables, scope and quantifiers is crucial in the use of loops, subroutines, and modules, and in software design. Logic is used in many areas of computer science, including digital design, program verification, databases, artificial intelligence, computability and complexity, algorithm analysis, and software specification. Every program implicitly asserts a theorem to the effect that the program will do what its documentation says it will. Proving that theorem is not merely a matter of luck or patient debugging. Making a correct program can be greatly aided by a logical analysis of what it is supposed to do, and, for small pieces of code, a proof that the code works can be produced handinhand with the construction of the code itself. 

The main objective of the course is to enable the student to write and annotate correct formal proofs of “theorems”, especially in predicate logic. A big secondary goal is to help the student to tell the difference between a theorem and a nontheorem, and to “DISprove” nontheorems. The student will be immersed in proof methodologies of propositional, and, much more extensively, of predicate, logic, via wellannotated and wellstructured proofs in both the “equational” and the “Hilbert” style of structuring proofs. Semantics will be introduced (informally, in the predicate case), partly to breathe “meaning” into the formal syntax of logic, and partly as an indispensable tool for producing the “disproofs” mentioned above. 

The text will be G. Tourlakis, Mathematical Logic (Wiley, 2008). 

 

 

MATH 1131 3.00 FW  

Introduction to Statistics I  

Calendar copy: Displaying and describing distributions; relations in categorical data; Simpson’s paradox and the need for design; experimental design and sampling design; randomization; probability laws and models; central limit theorem; statistical inference including confidence intervals and tests of significance; matched pairs; simulation. Prerequisite: At least one 12U mathematics course or OAC in mathematics is recommended. Course credit exclusion: SC/MATH 2560 3.00, SC/MATH 2930 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1610 3.00, SC/BIOL 2060 3.00.  

Note: MATH 1131 3.00 is a prerequisite for MATH 2131 3.00, MATH 3330 3.00, MATH 3333 3.00 and MATH 4143 3.00.  

Statistics is the science of data, and this course will introduce you to some of the basic, yet incredibly useful, statistical techniques. 

Topics include collection and analysis of data, graphical methods to represent data, numerical methods for describing univariate data both for samples and population, summarizing bivariate data, random variables and probability distributions, sampling variability and sampling distributions, estimation and testing using a single sample, comparison of two populations. 

It is recommended that students have at least one OAC in mathematics or a 12U mathematics course, but the mathematical level of the course will be quite elementary. Although students might be making use of the computer to calculate statistics, no previous experience in computing is required. Students will receive all the necessary instruction about how to use the statistical computer package chosen by the instructor. 

Although this course is recommended for students who wish to major in statistics, the concepts are broadly applicable and it should be interesting to students who do not plan to specialize in statistics. 

Coordinator: Y. Fu (yuejiao@mathstat.yorku.ca) 

 

 

MATH 1190 3.00 FW 

Introduction to Sets and Logic 

(formerly: MATH 1120 3.00, MATH 1090 3.00)  

Calendar copy: Topics include logic, sets, functions, relations, modular arithmetic and applications of elementary number theory, proof techniques, induction. Prerequisite: One 12U or OAC mathematics course or equivalent. NCR Note: This course may not be taken for degree credit by any student who has passed any 3000 or higherlevel mathematics course. Course credit exclusion: GL/CSLA/MATH/MODR 1650 3.00.  

Note: MATH 1190 3.00 is a prerequisite for MATH 1019 3.00, MATH 1090 3.00, MATH 2320 3.00 and MATH 3021 3.00.  

It is also intended for math majors and other students wanting an introduction to discrete mathematics. The topics covered are widely used throughout mathematics; many will crop up again in other mathematics courses. The purpose of this course is to give these topics a thorough treatment early in a student’s mathematical studies, with the intention of enhancing his or her understanding of future courses, irrespective of whether those courses have MATH 1190 as a prerequisite. The emphasis will be on understanding the basic ideas, and developing an appreciation for mathematical reasoning, proofs and problem solving. 

There is considerable overlap between the topics of MATH 1190 and those of the course MATH 1019 (see the MATH 1019 entry earlier in this supplemental calendar). Math majors can choose to take either of these two courses (see the Mathematics BA, BSc program tables at the back of this supplemental calendar), but, before choosing, they should note that: 

The coverage of topics in MATH 1019 should be at a higher “level” and perhaps at a faster pace than in MATH 1190. Moreover, MATH 1190 cannot be taken for degree credit by any student who has already passed MATH 1019. Note also that MATH 1019 is a program requirement in Computer Science. 

The text will be K.H. Rosen, Discrete Mathematics and its Applications, 7th ed. (McGraw-Hill). 

 

 

MATH 1200 3.00 FW 

Problems, Conjectures and Proofs  

Calendar copy: Extended exploration of elementary problems leading to conjectures, partial solutions, revisions, and convincing reasoning, and hence to proofs. Emphasis on problem solving, reasoning, and proving. Regular participation is required. Prerequisite: 12U Advanced Functions (MHF4U) or Advanced Functions and Introductory Calculus (MCB4U). Course credit exclusion: SC/MATH 2200 3.00. 

NCR note: Not open to any student who is taking or has passed a MATH course at the 3000 level or higher.  

Note: MATH 1200 3.00 is a prerequisite for MATH 2001 3.00, MATH 3021 3.00 and MATH 3141 3.00.  

Most high school mathematics problems are solved using algorithmic methods or by reference to model solutions. The main purpose of this course is to develop students' critical thinking abilities in order to obtain the confidence and ability to attack richer and more demanding problems. This is accomplished by developing logical and rational thinking through the mathematical languages of problems, proofs, and conjectures. 

The attempt to verify the correctness of one’s work leads to the need to explain one’s work to others. Learning how to present convincing reasoning as proof is a major goal of this course. Thus there will be great emphasis on the communication of convincing argument and significant class time will be devoted to reading, writing, and discussing proofs and mathematical arguments. Students will learn that theorems can often be correctly proved by many different approaches and that some approaches may offer advantages over others. Students will also learn that some proposed proofs have gaps that can be fixed using additional argument. 

Class and tutorial attendance is mandatory and active participation is expected of all students. Students will learn the mathematical word-processing package LaTeX, which will be required for homework assignments. The textbook for this course has not yet been chosen. 

 

 

MATH 1300 3.00 FW 

Differential Calculus with Applications  

Calendar copy: Limits, derivatives with applications, antiderivatives, fundamental theorem of calculus, beginnings of integral calculus. Prerequisite: SC/MATH 1520 3.00 or a high school calculus course. Course pcredit exclusions: SC/MATH 1000 3.00, SC/MATH 1013 3.00, SC/MATH 1505 6.00, SC/MATH 1513 6.00, SC/MATH 1530 3.00, SC/MATH 1550 6.00, SC/ISCI 1401 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1930 3.00, AP/ECON 1530 3.00.  

Note: MATH 1300 3.00 is a prerequisite for MATH 1014 3.00, MATH 1310 3.00, MATH 2001 3.00 and MATH 2200 3.00.  

Differential calculus is the study of rates of change of real valued functions. This notion will be precisely defined and key facts about it will be proved. The examination of these concepts will entail a close study of limits and continuity and will culminate with the proof of a remarkable theorem about the rate of change of the area bounded by the graph of a function. 

This is a theoretical course emphasizing precise definitions and featuring proofs of some important results. Students successfully completing this course should be well prepared to continue their studies of more advanced courses such as MATH 2001. The final grade will be based on three midterm examinations as well as a final examination. The material of the course will be presented in three lecture hours and one tutorial hour each week. 

The text will be Calculus (8th edition) by J. Stewart. This is not the same text as that used in MATH 1013. 

Coordinator: A. Chow (amchow@yorku.ca) 

 

 

MATH 1310 3.00 FW 

Integral Calculus with Applications  

Calendar copy: Transcendental functions, differential equations, techniques of integration, improper integrals, infinite series. Prerequisite(s): One of SC/MATH 1013 3.00, SC/MATH 1300 3.00; or, for nonscience students only, six credits from SC/MATH 1530 3.00 and SC/MATH 1540 3.00, SC/MATH 1550 6.00, AP/ECON 1530 3.00 and AP/ECON 1540 3.00. Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1014 3.00, SC/MATH 1505 6.00, SC/ISCI 1402 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1940 3.00.  

Note: MATH 1310 3.00 is a prerequisite for MATH 2015 3.00, MATH 2030 3.00, MATH 2041 3.00, MATH 2200 3.00, MATH 2280 3.00, MATH 2310 3.00, MATH 3001 3.00 and MATH 3241 3.00.  

This is the second in a series of introductory calculus courses designed to follow MATH 1300. The study of integral calculus begun in MATH1300 is continued. The first half of the course emphasizes methods of integration. Exponential and logarithmic functions are properly defined using integrals. Improper integrals are used to study unbounded areas. Applications are made to compute volumes, approximate areas and compute distance traveled. Simple differential equations are solved with applications to exponential growth and mixing problems. Infinite sequences and series are studied. Functions are represented by Taylor series and power series are used to compute limits and approximate integrals. 

This is a theoretical course emphasizing precise definitions and featuring proofs of some important results. Students successfully completing this course should be well prepared to continue their studies of more advanced courses such as MATH 2001. The final grade will be based on three midterm examinations as well as a final examination. The material of the course will be presented in three lecture hours and one tutorial hour each week. 

The text will be Calculus (8th edition) by J.Stewart. This is not the same text as that used in MATH 1014. 

Coordinator: A. Chow (amchow@yorku.ca) 

 

 

MATH 1505 6.00 Y 

Mathematics for the Life and Social Sciences  

Calendar copy: A presentation of the elements of single-variable differential and integral calculus, elementary linear algebra and introductory probability and statistics. This course is designed to provide a comprehensive mathematical background for students of the biological and social sciences. Emphasis is placed on basic mathematical skills and their applications. Prerequisite: 12U Advanced Functions (MHF4U) or equivalent, or SC/MATH 1510 6.00. Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1013 3.00, SC/MATH 1014 3.00, SC/MATH 1300 3.00, SC/MATH 1310 3.00, SC/MATH 1530 3.00, SC/MATH 1540 3.00, SC/MATH 1550 6.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1930 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1940 3.00, AP/ECON 1530 3.00, AP/ECON 1540, SC/ISCI 1401 3.00, SC/ISCI 1402 3.00, SC/ISCI 1410 6.00.  

The course content emphasizes the following topics in an introductory but mathematically rigorous way: functions, differentiation, integration, matrices and probability.  Applications are discussed throughout the course and calculators are not allowed in this course. It is imperative students taking this course have the appropriate prerequisite mathematical knowledge in order to excel in this course. Students who feel that they do not, are strongly encouraged to enrol in Math 1510 first to build their foundational mathematics. Upon successful completion of Math 1510 (i.e., B or higher), students will then be prepared for Math 1505.  

For students enrolled in Math 1505 and who are unsure if they have sufficient prerequisite mathematical knowledge, they should speak with their Math 1505 professor before the add/drop deadline, and there may be an assessment quiz at the beginning of the course to assess mathematical preparedness for Math 1505.    

Math 1505 is designed for students enrolled in programs that only require 6 credits of mathematics, and should be taken in the first year of academic studies.  Typically, students in a Biology, Psychology and/or Health program enrol in Math 1505. Students who are looking for a comprehensive study of the topics listed above should not be taking Math 1505. The mathematics learned in Math 1505 will not be sufficient for students furthering a pursuit of mathematics at an intermediate or advance level.   

The text is J. Stewart and T. Day, Biocalculus: Calculus, Probability, and Statistics for the Life Sciences. 

Coordinator: A. McEachran (andrew6@yorku.ca) 

 

 

MATH 1510 6.00 Y 

Fundamentals of Mathematics  

Calendar copy: Designed for the student whose mathematical background is weak and who wishes to take further courses in mathematics. Topics include algebraic equations and inequalities; simple sequences and series; analytic geometry; trigonometry; functions, including algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Prerequisites: Ontario Grade 11 Functions or Functions & Relations (new curriculum) or Grade 12 Advanced Mathematics (old curriculum). NCR Note: May not be taken by any student who has taken or is currently taking another university course in mathematics or statistics except for SC/MATH 1520 3.00. Course credit exclusion: GL/ITEC/MATH/MODR 1670 6.00.  

Note: MATH 1510 6.00 is a prerequisite for MATH 1505 6.00.  

This course prepares students for additional courses in mathematics. 

Students in the Faculty of Health (or biology majors) who wish to be better prepared for MATH 1505 should take this course first. If you complete MATH 1510 successfully, you will be well prepared to take MATH 1505. 

Students in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies who wish to be better prepared for courses like MATH 1520 should take this course. If you succeed (or are succeeding) in MATH 1510, you will be better prepared for MATH 1520. 

 

 

MATH 1520 3.00 FW 

Introduction to Calculus, with Vectors 

 Calendar Copy: Elements of vectors in 2 and 3space including dot products, cross products, lines, and planes; elements of differential calculus including limits and derivatives. Designed for student who have not taken (or who have performed inadequately in) Ontario high school calculus. Prerequisite: One of: MATH 1510 6.00, an OAC mathematics course, 12U Advanced Functions (MHF4U), or equivalent; or permission of the department. This course may be taken at the same time as the second half of MATH 1510 6.00. NCR Note: May not be taken by any student who has passed or is currently taking another university course in calculus, with the exception of students taking SC/MATH 1550 6.00 concurrently.  

Note: MATH 1520 3.00 is a prerequisite for MATH 1013 3.00, MATH 1300 3.00 and MATH 1550 6.00.  

This course covers the elements of differential calculus including limits, rates of changes, derivatives, methods of differentiation, applications of derivatives, related rates, extreme values, maximum and minimum problems and curve sketching. The course also covers elements of vector in 2- and 3-space including dot products, cross products, lines, and planes. 

Coordinator: A. Weiss (weiss@mathstat.yorku.ca) 

 

 

MATH 1532 3.00 FW 

Statistics for Business and Society  

Calendar Copy: An introduction to statistics with an emphasis on concepts and applications relevant in the Business and Society program. Students learn basic and practical statistical techniques to explore and analyze data. Emphasis is placed on statistical reasoning and the critical interpretation of statistical information such as that seen in the media and journals. NCR note: SC/MATH 1532 3.00 may not be taken for credit by any student who has successfully completed or is concurrently enrolled in SC/MATH 1131 3.00, SC/MATH 2560 3.00, SC/MATH 2570 3.00, SC/MATH 2930 3.00, SC/BIOL 2060 3.00 or equivalents. Course credit exclusion: SC/NATS 1500 3.00.  

This course is an introduction to statistics specifically designed for students in the Business and Society program in the Division of Social Science. Students learn basic and practical statistical techniques to explore and analyze data. Emphasis is placed on statistical reasoning and the critical interpretation of statistical information such as that seen in the media and in journals. 

There is also a strong emphasis on acquiring practical skills in data exploration with spreadsheet software such as Excel or Calc. The course includes weekly tutorials in a computer lab. 

Grading is based on 

  1. Assignments including lab exercises: 30%
  2. Structured project based on the analysis of real data: 25%
  3. Midterm test: 20%
  4. Final exam: 25%

The text is to be announced. 

Coordinator: Y. Wu (wuyh@mathstat.yorku.ca) 

 

  

MATH 1550 6.00 Y 

Mathematics with Management Applications  

Calendar copy: This course is designed to provide a mathematical background for students in the BBA Honours program. It is also suitable for the bachelor program in mathematics for commerce, but should not be taken by those who intend to major in any other program in mathematics or statistics or in computer science. It includes calculus, basic mathematics of finance and linear algebra, elementary probability and statistics, and elements of optimization with applications to management. Prerequisite: SC/MATH 1520 3.00 (may also be taken as a first-term corequisite), or a high school calculus course. Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1013 3.00, SC/MATH 1300 3.00, SC/MATH 1505 6.00, SC/MATH 1513 6.00, SC/MATH 1530 3.00, SC/MATH 1540 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1930 3.00, AP/ECON 1530 3.00, AP/ECON 1540 3.00. NCR Note: No credit will be retained for this course for students who have successfully completed or who are currently taking SC/MATH 1021 3.00, SC/MATH 1025 3.00, SC/MATH 2021 3.00, SC/MATH 2221 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 2650 3.00 or equivalent.  

Note: MATH 1550 3.00 is a prerequisite for MATH 1014 3.00, MATH 1310 3.00 and MATH 3330 3.00.  

This course is designed primarily for students interested in business programs. It satisfies a requirement for entry to the delayed entry BBA (Hons) Programs in the Schulich School of Business. One theme of the course is optimization - how to maximize or minimize a linear functions of several variables subject to linear constraints. Most of the course is a discussion of calculus and its applications to management; matrix theory and its applications including elementary Markov chains are also discussed. The emphasis will be on techniques and on applications to business and management problems. The content of this course is mostly similar but is not coinciding with that of the two courses MATH 1530 3.00 and MATH 1540 3.00. These courses will satisfy the requirements for the programs mentioned above, and they are suitable for those who plan to major in economics. Those who wish a stronger foundation in calculus, or who wish to major in any Mathematics program other than those mentioned above, should avoid calculus courses with second digit 5. 

The textbook is Ernest F. Haeussler Jr., Richard S. Paul and Richard J. Wood, Introductory Mathematical Analysis for Business and Economics, 14th ed. by Pearson Canada Inc., 2019. The grading scheme has not been determined as this supplemental calendar goes to press. 

Coordinator: I. Raguimov (raguimov@mathstat.yorku.ca) 

 

 

MATH 1581 3.00 FW 

Business Mathematics I  

Calendar copy: This course is an introduction to interest rates (simple, compound), annuities (ordinary, due, deferred), amortization (mortgages, other debts), sinking funds, bonds (face value, bond rate, price, yield rate) and depreciation (straight line, constant percentage). Prerequisite: Ontario Grade 11 mathematics or equivalent. Course credit exclusion: SC/MATH 2580 6.00 (prior to Fall 2010), SC/MATH 2280 3.00, GL/ECON 1950 3.00, GL/MATH 1950 3.00, GL/MATH 2680 6.00, GL/MODR 1950 3.00. 

Note: MATH 1581 3.00 is a prerequisite for MATH 2581 3.00.  

A different title for this course might be “The Mathematics of Money”. As money moves through time, the force of interest must be taken into account. Doing so requires mathematical calculations, and this course introduces some of those calculations. While the background required is only (the equivalent of) Ontario Grade 11 mathematics, the course will be a university-level mathematics course that requires problem-solving skills. 

This course will be offered in both Fall term and Winter term. It should be particularly attractive to students in the Business and Society Program, and also to students in economics and business-related areas. The course emphasizes problem-solving rather than theory. Computers (spreadsheets) will not be used; student will need a hand-held calculator which can at least calculate exponents and logarithms. 

Tentatively, the text will be R.L. Brown, S. Kopp and P. Zima, Mathematics of Finance, latest edition (McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited), but only about half the text (and not exactly the first half) will be covered. 

The grading scheme for the course has not been determined, but it will likely involve one or two tests and a final examination.