IPSC Independent Study Students

One way to obtain research experience in the IPSC lab is through an independent study course. Independent study students are often matched with a graduate student in the lab and are expected to devote at least 5 hours a week to a specific research project. In addition, independent study students are expected to conduct a literature search on their topic and write a final report (a mini-thesis) on their research.

If you are interested in taking part in an independent study project, please send Dr. Steele an email (steeleje@yorku.ca) and be sure to include a copy of your current transcript, your resume, and a writing sample. Please note that students accepted as independent study students in the IPSC laboratory usually have an A average, and students in their second or third year who plan to conduct their thesis in the lab in the following year are given the highest priority. For more information on how to gain additional research experience in the lab, please see the research assistant section of this website.

 

Cassie Danz   2020 - Winter
Cassandra Stevenson   2019 - Fall
David Herman   2017 - Winter
Paper Title: How and when do parents discuss race with their children?: A literature review of parental racial socialization practices in Black and White families
*David received the prestigious Gold and Silver medals from the Faculty of Health in 2019. He received a CPA award of excellence for this paper and part of this review paper is published in the Journal of Interpersonal Relations, Intergroup Relations and Identity (JIRIRI). David will begin medical school in the fall of
2019.*
Dalia Muskat-Brown    2016 - Summer
Paper Title: Face recognition biases: Own-group favouritism and cultural implications
.
Octavia Wong   2016 - Summer
Paper Title: Can You Remember Faces? The Effect of Cultural Differences on Face Recognition Biases
Octavia Wong is a graduate student in the School of Kinesiology and Health Sciences at York University. .
Allison Sletcher   2015 - Fall
Paper Title: How Culture Influences the Faces We Remember: Culture and Own-Group Biases in Face Recognition
Allison worked with Dr. Steele and collaborators Dr. Andy Ng (http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Andy_Ng2/info) and Dr. Joni Sasaki on a project examining cultural differences in face recognition biases.
Jacob Schlosser   2014-2015 - Fall/Winter
Paper Title: Social Identity and Bias: How Emotional Expression and Race Shape Implicit Attitudes
Jacob has worked in the IPSC lab since his first year. Across the years he has worked with both child and adult participants. For his independent study examined implicit racial biases and how these biases are affected by contextual cues.
Tracy Fabri   2014 - Winter
Paper Title: Individual differences in spontaneous categorization by race
Tracy has worked with child and adult participants in our lab since her first year. In 2014-2015, Tracy will complete her thesis with Dr. Steele.
Tian Xu   2013 - Summer
Paper Title: Differential effects of interdependence on face recognition in two cultures.
Tian will be working with Andy Ng to investigate whether interdependence interacts with culture to affect people's memory for novel faces.
Arvin Jagayat   2013 - In the Winter Term
For this project, Arvin has been working with Maggie Cease and Corey Lipman to examine the impact of person construal on implicit racial biases. Arvin is also a volunteer research assistant in the lab.
Laine Bourassa   2012-2013 - Fall/Winter
Laine has worked as both a volunteer and paid research assistant. She helped to oversee the research team which collected the data for her independent study over the summer of 2012. Her full-year independent study will examine the Narrative Collective Assimilation hypothesis with children.
Amanda Edwards   2012 - Summer
Paper Title: Implicit racial bias and emotion in children: A literature review
Amanda Edwards has been a volunteer and paid research assistant in our lab. She has proven to have great skill in working with adult and child participants.
Jonathan Canzio   2011 - Summer Term
Paper Title: Eye-Tracking and Cross-Race Bias: The Role of Visual Attention
Jonathan completed his thesis with us in the 2011-2012 academic year.
Amanda Sharples   2011 - In the Winter Term
Paper Title: Implicit racial attitudes: In-group preference or out-group prejudice?
Amanda has worked as a volunteer and paid research assistant in the lab, has conducted this independent study and completed her thesis with us in the 2011-2012 academic year.
Milena Stelmaszak   2010 - Winter Term
Paper Title: Influence of Successful Peers on Math Test Performance
In addition to volunteering as a research assistant in the laboratory, Milena was involved in an independent study project examining the effect of social comparisons on the math test performance of women in the sciences.
Anna Loi   2007 - Winter Term
In addition to conducting her thesis in the laboratory, Anna was involved in an independent study project examining the emergence of racial identity and racial stereotyping among children in early elementary school. Anna also worked as a RAY research assistant in the laboratory during that term.
Doriann Shapiro   2006 - Summer Term
Paper Title: Children's implicit and explicit gender preferences and biases
Following the completion of her thesis in the IPSC laboratory, Doriann conducted an independent study project in the laboratory in order to gain additional research experience. In the past year, Doriann has been hired on an occasional basis as a research assistant for several of our research projects with children.
Faustina Otchere   2005 - Fall Term
Paper Title: The role of racial identity in sensitivity to status based rejection.
Jeanette Pontiero   2005 - A Summer Term
Paper Title: Facial variation and impression formation: From physical to social judgements.
I was greatly motivated to pursue my interest in stereotyping and prejudice research after taking the behavior in groups course here at York. My study dealt with racially defining physical features and how these features come to play a role in stereotype activation not only for in-group members, but also for out-group
members possessing these features. The studies conducted in the lab were both fascinating and crucial in helping us understand prejudice and the stereotyping process. The research experience I gained during this time will be very useful to me in the future, in addition to the wonderful team we have working here in the lab.
Anita Thakurdeen   2004-2005 - Fall/Winter
Paper Title: The role of racial identity in sensitivity to status based rejection.

 

 

 

 

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© 2007 Jennifer Steele, Ph.D., York University.                For information about this website please contact Christina Lapytskaia at clapy@yorku.ca                Last updated: 2019-12-12