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Graduate Program in Communication & Culture

Faculty Profiles

Leah Vosko

Politics and Policy

University York
Email lvosko@yorku.ca
Phone Number (416) 736-2100 ext. 33157
Office Location 618 York Research Tower
Office Hours By appointment

 

Education

1998 PhD, York University; 1994 MA., Simon Fraser University; 1992 BA., Trent University

Biography

Leah F. Vosko is Professor and Canada Research Chair in Feminist Political Economy at York University. Professor Vosko is the author of Temporary Work: The Gendered Rise of a Precarious Employment Relationship (University of Toronto Press, 2000) and co-author of Self-Employed Workers Organize: Law, Policy and Unions (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2005 with Cranford, Fudge, and Tucker). She is co-editor of Changing Canada: Political Economy as Transformation (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2003 with Clement), Challenging the Market: The Struggle to Regulate Work and Income (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2004 with Stanford), and Gender and the Contours of Precarious Employment (Routledge, 2009, with MacDonald and Campbell) as well as editor of Precarious Employment: Understanding Labour Market Insecurity in Canada (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2006). Her writings have also appeared in venues such as Comparative Labor Law and Policy Journal, Industrial Relations/ Relations Industrielles, Social Indicators Research, the Cambridge Journal of Regional Economics and Economic and Industrial Democracy.
Professor Vosko’s latest book, Managing the Margins: Gender, Citizenship and the International Regulation of Precarious Employment (2010) is published with Oxford University Press, UK. Since 2001, she has overseen collaborative Gender and Work Database-Comparative Perspectives on Precarious Employment Database project (GWD-CPD) involving co-investigators from across Europe and North America as well as Australia (www.genderwork.ca).

Research Interests

Comparative labour and social policy; the political economy of work; gender and work; economic restructuring; globalization


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Harold [Innis] taught us how to use the bias of culture and communication as an instrument of research. By directing attention to the bias, or distorting power of the dominant imagery and technology of any culture, he showed us how to understand cultures.
~ Marshall McLuhan