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Calumet & Stong Colleges Celebrate Black History Month

Join Calumet and Stong Colleges as we celebrate Black achievement and recognize people and organizations creating change. 

In 1978, the Ontario Black History Society (OBHS) petitioned for the City of Toronto to recognize February as Black History Month. In 1979, Toronto became the first Canadian city to make this proclamation. By 1995, following a motion by Hon. Jean Augustine, the House of Commons officially recognized February as Black History Month across all of Canada.

Black History Month is an opportunity for us to celebrate and reflect on the many contributions of Black people and their communities. In Canada, Black men and women have made significant progress and have achieved great success in many of our sectors. Black Canadians have supported important industries such as mining and farming, they have helped to build up our professional sports and entertainment scenes, they have developed innovations in the areas of science and technology, they have made their mark in journalism, and they have founded thriving businesses.

Black History Month is also an opportunity for us to understand Black histories. We are encouraged to reflect on stories of racism and slavery to recognize the institutions and individuals from which systematic injustices stemmed, and the ways in which these injustices persist today. Moreover, we recognize the Black individuals, such as those who have formed activist groups and organizations, who assert themselves against conditions of oppression, racism, and discrimination. Such efforts to protest racial and social inequities help in moving our society towards inclusion and diversity.

Learn more about the significance and history of Black History Month in Canada here:


What is the significance of Black History Month to you?

During Black History Month, we are encouraged to recognize Black excellence, and honour the past and present contributions of the Black community. Here is a list of ways you can meaningfully participate in the celebrations:

Attend local events and programs

  • The Student Success teams at Calumet and Stong Colleges are hosting some great events this month and have compiled a list of events across York. Check out the events listings below for descriptions of all upcoming events.

Engage with music and film by Black creators

  • Check out the films and short movies featured at the Toronto Black Film Festival. All films will be streamed on the film festival’s online platform. You may purchase tickets to film screenings if you are able to: https://torontoblackfilm.com/
  • Black in a Post-Sec is an insightful documentary created by Ryerson University, University of Toronto, and York University’s Black Students’ Alliances to offer perspectives on the experiences that Black students face in post-secondary institutions.
  • Use platforms like YouTube to access playlists featuring music by Black artists. Some suggestions include:
Afrobeats Now (YouTube)
Afrobeat Hits 2021/2022 (YouTube)

The Greatest Canadian Hip Hop Playlist (YouTube Playlist)
Strictly Roots/Reggae (YouTube Playlist)

Watch and listen to educational podcasts by Black-Canadian creators

  1. Black Tea podcast: https://frequencypodcastnetwork.com/podcasts/black-tea/
  2. The Drip podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/the-drip/id1506583041
  3. The Secret Life of Canada podcast: https://www.cbc.ca/listen/cbc-podcasts/203-the-secret-life-of-canada
  4. Black Canadian Content Creators podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/1L3V8jvqM87NoiFopVJR6p

Learn about noteworthy Black figures and their contributions


Support Black-owned businesses

  • Afrobiz is a website that makes it easy to discover local black-owned businesses and entrepreneurs: https://www.afrobiz.ca/

Read texts by Black authors

  • Hood Feminism by Mikki Kendal
    • Hood Feminsim: Notes From The Women That a Movement Forgot is a novel that criticizes the conversations that mainstream feminists talk about today. Core issues such as access to quality education, safe neighbourhoods, living wages, and healthcare are often forgotten in the conversations of prominent white feminists.
    • You can find the book here: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/586743/hood-feminism-by-mikki-kendall/
  • Consecrated Ground by George Boyd
    • Canada’s largest and oldest black community, Africville, was bulldozed in 1965. Nova Scotian playwright, George Boyd, details the struggle and courage of Africville residents in saving their beloved community from complete extinction.
    • You can find the book here: https://talonbooks.com/books/consecrated-ground
  • Terra Incognita by Adebe DeRango-Adem
    • Terra incognita is the Latin term for “unknown land”. The book is a collection of poems that focus on racial discourses, historical narratives, Canadian/American race relations, and the legacies of those who have had their histories and identities questioned
    • You can find the book here: https://www.inanna.ca/product/terra-incognita/ 

How do you celebrate Black History Month within your community?

At York University, there have been conscientious efforts to educate and prevent anti-Black racism on campus and online. York University strives to promote all aspects of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in the classroom setting and off-campus. Calumet and Stong Colleges echo the sentiments of York University and continue to deliver resources and support to the Black community.

Here are some examples of York University programs that strive to combat anti-Black Racism and support the Black community:

Centre for Human Rights, Equity, and Inclusion: York University’s Centre for Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion (REI) provides workshops and resources to support diversity and inclusivity in the university community.

Black Excellence at York University: Black Excellence at York University or BE YU for short is an initiative to support Black students' high school to university transition and the student experience while completing their university degree.

Framework to Address Anti-Black Racism: The Framework to Address Anti-Black Racism is an outline of the various initiatives created to make systemic change on anti-black racism.

The Harriet Tubman Institute: The Harriet Tubman Institute is committed to the study of the past as it is linked to the present experience of Africans and its Diasporas from multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives.

Liberal Arts & Professional Studies Addressing Anti-Black Racism: Learn how LAPS is addressing anti-Black racism.

York University’s Celebrates Black History Month: Click here to see the Black History Month celebrations within York University.

York University’s Statement on anti-Black racism can be found here: https://yfile.news.yorku.ca/2020/06/01/statement-york-university-stands-together-against-anti-black-racism/?utm_source=YFile_Email&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=Top-Stories&utm_campaign=yfile%20%20


As a student population, what is something we could improve on to help Black students in the classroom?

In 2013, Black Lives Matter started as a hashtag to gain traction online and in the media to end police brutality against Black communities. With the resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement in the media, many individuals and communities have come together to show their support to end the systemic racism and racial injustices towards Black individuals.

Since then, the Black Lives Matter movement enacted change within company structures and documents to support Black and Indigenous People of Colour (BIPOC). Many of these changes have been aimed at creating safer workplaces and learning environment for BIPOC, and focusing on equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) in all aspects of work.

However, as a society there is still a long way to go before oppressive structures of the government and anti-Black racism are completely dismantled. In moving towards this goal, we must continue to educate, protest, and call out the marginalization of BIPOC communities.

Calumet and Stong Colleges have put together a list to aid Black students and faculty:

Canadian equity and anti-racism organizations:


What conversations do we need to continue to have in the classroom setting about anti-black racism?

We have compiled an exciting list of activities for the CCSC community to recognize and celebrate Black History Month.
Make sure to keep checking this page for updates!

#BHMatYU and #BlackHistoryMonth

Throughout February make sure to check out https://www.yorku.ca/about/blackhistorymonth/ and York's social media channels.

You can also join the conversation with #BHMatYU and #BlackHistoryMonth.

Black History Month Blog

Tell us your thoughts on Black History Month. We encourage you to write or submit artwork or photographs and we will post to our BHM Blog.

Submit your blog post here.

BHM Reading and Viewing Lists

Tell us what you are reading and watching to recognize and celebrate Black History Month and we will share your choices in our BHM Reading and Viewing lists.

Tell us what you are reading here.

Tell us what you are watching here.

Write and Publish an Article for Excalibur Publications

If you are interested in writing an article, Women's Day is around the corner and Excalibur Publications is looking for content contributors! This year's theme is about BIPOC Female Leadership and article topics include dance, sports, policy, health, fashion and more!

If you're interested in getting involved, please contact Kiana at kb9@my.yorku.ca for more details 

Dr. Bonita Lawrence Living in Reciprocity: Historical and Theoretical Perspectives on Indigenous-Black Relations

In this informative session Dr. Lawrence discusses relations between Indigenous peoples and Black people in Canada, as well as the social issues faced by these communities.

A recording of this event will be posted soon.

Scholars’ Hub @ Home | Dancin’ Feet: Harlem and basketball in the 1920-30s

Wednesday, February 2, 2022

12:00pm-1:00pm

Register for Dancin' Feet Harlem and basketball in the 1920's-30's

Dr. Danielle Howard, assistant professor in the Department of Theatre at the School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design

The New York Renaissance basketball team, an all-Black professional team, emerged within the social and cultural movement known as the Harlem Renaissance. Playing basketball during the epicenter of Black entertainment, this talk highlights a history of Black basketball players who used their bodies to orient themselves toward freedom and secure a cultural legacy.

Check out https://www.yorku.ca/about/blackhistorymonth/ for more events.

The Construction and Maintenance of Systemic Racism

Thursday, February 3, 2022

10:30am-12:00pm

Register for The Construction and Maintenance of Systemic Racism

This session will explore the history of race and racism and how it is maintained today in institutions across Canada. This workshop is designed to complement the anti-racism REDI series and is heavily information focused, aiming to give context to what is happening in our world today. Unlike other REDI sessions, the emphasis is less on skill-building and more on awareness-building and we strongly encourage participants to take this session in conjunction with other anti-racism workshops with a more action-oriented content.

Learn more about REI's Anti-Racism Workshop Series

Black History Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon Editing Session #1

Friday, February 4, 2022

1:00pm - 4:00 pm EST

Register for Editing Session #1

Every Friday in February, join your library for facilitated editing sessions on Zoom: you can learn the basics or get a refresher on editing Wikipedia and Wikidata, then learn and write alongside others who are passionate about improving digital coverage of Black histories and experiences. Register for the weekly editing sessions.

You can also join the event and edit at your own pace throughout the month. For full details, visit the Black History Edit-a-thon event page.

This event is organized by U of T Libraries, York University Libraries, X University Library, and Toronto Public Library. We look forward to seeing you!

Celebrate While We Educate: Come and Cook with CAMSA

Monday, February 7, 2022

12:00pm-1:00pm

Register for Come and Cook with CAMSA

#CWWE Cooking segment featuring Cameroonian Students Association

Celebrate While We Educate: Guess the Flag & Workshop

Monday, February 7, 2022

1:00pm-2:00pm

Register for Guess the Flag & Workshop

Guess the flag and workshop featuring the Glendon African Network.

#CWWE Presented by SCLD and the Black Student Associations


Black History Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon

Monday, February 7, 2022 Kick Off Event

1:00 - 2:30 pm EST

Register for the kick-off event

Representation matters: not just on our screens, but in the information and data we share. This February, join your library in celebrating Black History Month by improving coverage of Black histories on Wikipedia - and new this year, Wikidata! No prior editing experience is required.

Join us Feb 7, 1–2:30 pm ET for a kick-off event featuring these speakers:

  • Moderator: Mark Campbell, assistant professor of music and culture (U of T Scarborough)
  • Cheryl Thompson, assistant professor of creative industries (X University)
  • Collette “Coco” Murray, PhD candidate and African/Caribbean arts-based educator (York University)

Every Friday in February, join your library for facilitated editing sessions on Zoom: you can learn the basics or get a refresher on editing Wikipedia and Wikidata, then learn and write alongside others who are passionate about improving digital coverage of Black histories and experiences. Register for the weekly editing sessions.

You can also join the event and edit at your own pace throughout the month. For full details, visit the Black History Edit-a-thon event page.

This event is organized by U of T Libraries, York University Libraries, X University Library, and Toronto Public Library. We look forward to seeing you!


Say It Loud: A Roundtable on Accent Training for Racialized Actors

Monday, February 7, 2022

7:00pm

Register for Say It Loud: A Roundtable on Accent Training for Racialized Actors

The Department of Theatre at York University’s School of Arts, Media, Performance and Design is hosting A Roundtable on Accent and Language Training for Racialized Actors on Monday, February 7 at 7 p.m.

Join the conversation as four prominent accent/language coaches of colour for Theatre, Film and TV discuss inclusion in accent training and coaching for IBPOC actors: Lisa Cromarty, Michelle Lopez-Rios, Joy Lanceta Coronel, and Alicia Richardson (see bios below).

Hosted by York faculty member Eric Armstrong, topics for discussion will include strategies to better serve actors-in-training from Indigenous, Black, Asian, Latinx, and other communities.

How do we decolonize accent training and prepare students to tackle languages they may not know? Tune in as our panelists discuss the wisdom and tools they’ve gained along the way.

Thanks for additional support from the “Breaking Stereotypes” project associated with the Tier II York Research Chair in Theatre and Performance.

BIOS

Lisa Cromarty is anishaabe/oji-cree actor and voice coach residing in Northern Ontario and is a member of Wikwemikong Unceded Territory located on Manitoulin Island. She has trained at the Centre for Indigenous Theatre and Canada’s National Voice Intensive. As a vocal coach trainee, Lisa was invited for two seasons to be mentored by the coaching team at the Stratford Theatre Festival as well as with the Head of Voice at the National Theatre School. Her acting work includes performances with 20WEST, APTN, Fox Pictures, CBC, Anova Pictures, the National Film Board, the National Arts Centre and the Debajehmujig Theatre Company, among others. She most recently played Cammy in Wild Indian, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2021.

She currently teaches Voice & Text classes at the Centre for Indigenous Theatre and has vocal coached at the National Theatre School and the Birmingham Conservatory. As of January 2022, Lisa is enrolled in a language master-apprentice program where she will be working one on one with a fluent anishinabemowin speaker in an immersion format to reclaim her ancestral language.

Michelle Lopez-Rios is a teatrista, voice coach, director, actor and activist. She is an Associate Professor of Voice and Speech and Artistic Director of Chicago Playworks at The Theatre School at DePaul. She is also an Associate Teacher of Fitzmaurice Voicework ®. Some favorite coaching credits include Familiar (Steppenwolf); Father Comes Home From the Wars (Parts 1, 2 &3), Measure for Measure (Goodman Theatre); Julius Caesar, Mojada (Oregon Shakespeare Festival); The Foreigner (Milwaukee Repertory Theatre); The Brothers Size, Lobby Hero, The Train Driver (Milwaukee Chamber Theatre); Crumbs from the Table of Joy (Renaissance Theaterworks); and Othello, The Taming of the Shrew, The Comedy of Errors, Hamlet (Houston Shakespeare Festival). Together with Alvaro Saar Rios, she co-founded the Royal Mexican Players in 2004.

Joy Lanceta Coronel is a speech, communication, and dialect coach who has worked alongside Comedy Central, Center Theatre Group, Atlantic Theatre Company, Playwrights Horizons, American Players Theatre, Ma-Yi Theatre, Williamstown Festival, NAATCO, Roundhouse Theatre, American Players Theatre, and Actors Theatre of Louisville. She has served as Speech faculty at HB Studio, University of Connecticut, AADA, University of Cincinnati-College Conservatory of Music, and the University of Essex. Joy also serves as an executive presentation coach for corporate professionals and a communication coach for victims of domestic violence. You may find her published articles covering topics like racial identity, cultural sensitivity, and inclusive coaching and teaching strategies at www.joylancetacoronel.com

Alicia Richardson is an actor/writer, and vocal coach who hails from Boynton Beach, Florida. She graduated from York University’s MFA Acting & Diploma of Voice Teaching Programs. Now a Permanent Resident of Canada, Alicia calls Toronto her home. Her body of work spans television, film, theatre, and voice-over. As a voice and dialect coach, Alicia has worked for Soulpepper Theatre Company (Ma Rainey’s Black BottomThe Brother’s SizeJesus Hopped the A Train), The Shaw Festival (Trouble in Mind), Cahoots Theatre (Our Place), and as a member of faculty at Sheridan College since 2016. For Sheridan: The Mill on the FlossMetamorphosesReally, ReallyThree Sisters; Clybourne Park; The Glove Thief; This is War; The Hobbit.

Check out https://www.yorku.ca/about/blackhistorymonth/ for more events.

Moving Forward: How our alumni are strengthening Black communities

Tuesday, February 8, 2022

12:30pm-1:30pm

Register for Moving Forward: How our alumni are strengthening Black communities

Join us for a talk with LA&PS graduates who are active in various initiatives addressing anti-Black racism and contributing positively to Black communities, families, and students. Our Panelists:

  • Craig Wellington, BA, English ‘88
    Executive Director at Black Opportunity Fund
  • Kamika McLean, BA, Political Science and Law & Society ‘02
    General Counsel & Corporate Secretary at KSS HoldCo Inc.
  • Kevin Yarde, BA, Political Science ‘90
    MPP – Brampton North at Government of Ontario

Hosted by Michele Johnson, Associate Dean, Students. Includes Q&A session.

Check out https://www.yorku.ca/about/blackhistorymonth/ for more events.


Celebrate While We Educate: Guess the Song

Tuesday, February 8, 2022

1:30pm-2:30pm

Register for Guess the Song

Guess the Song featuring York United Black Students Alliance.

#CWWE Presented by SCLD and the Black Student Associations


Recognizing Resilience in Communities

Tuesday, February 8, 2022

1:30pm-3:00pm

Register for Recognizing Resilience in Communities

Participants will engage in discussions about community resilience in the face of disadvantage and hardship, examining the ways barriers and discrimination shape our perspective of communities under duress. The workshop will help participants consider how to engage and foster inclusivity across multiple groups and spaces.

Learn more about REI's Anti-Racism Workshop Series

Celebrate While We Educate: Mental Health Talks

Wednesday, February 9, 2022

1:00pm-2:00pm

Register for Mental Health Talks

Mental Health Talks featuring Black Students in Psychology (BSIP) and Black Students Mentorship Program (BSMP)

Celebrate While We Educate: Guess the Flag

Wednesday, February 9, 2022

2:00pm-3:00pm

Register for Guess the Flag

Guess the Flag featuring United Caribbean Islands

#CWWE Presented by SCLD and the Black Student Associations


Speed Painting: Black History Month

Wednesday, February 9, 2022

6:00pm-7:00 pm EST

Register for Speed Painting

During this session, you will learn how to make a quick nature landscape! Speed Painting is a calm and easy way to learn the methods for making a painting. Painting is a fun way to express yourself artistically. Take a break, decompress and partake in this self-care-oriented workshop!

To participate in this workshop, participants will need to have the following items:
· Acrylic Paint (Black, White, Red, Blue and Yellow)
· Brushes (Small pointed brush, Medium and big flat brush, and Medium angle brush)
· Canvas or Paper (any size)
· Cup of water
· Tissues

Creative Arts workshops are an opportunity for community members to take a break, decompress and partake in self-care-oriented sessions.

Each workshop is facilitated by an artist that will guide you through lessons and/or activities where you can explore, learn, and develop skills across various artistic mediums including poetry, visual arts, photography, sewing, baking and more.

Celebrate While We Educate: Dance Workshop

Thursday, February 10, 2022

3:00pm-4:00pm

Register for Dance Workshop

Dance workshop featuring Nigerian Students Association at York U

#CWWE Presented by SCLD and the Black Student Associations


Black Women in Leadership

Thursday, February 10, 2022

6:00pm-7:00pm

Register for Black Women in Leadership

At Calumet and Stong Colleges, we strive to foster inclusivity and to celebrate diversity. Our Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) team implements programs that allow students to learn about intersectionality and the ways in which we can achieve inclusion and equity within our school community. One of our programs includes a brand-new panel discussion called Black Women in Leadership

We have invited Black women from diverse fields of work and education to engage in a conversation about their leadership experiences, careers, and advice. Our panelists will address intersectionality, their current leadership roles, initiatives they are part of, their challenging experiences, their efforts in supporting Black Indigenous People of Colour in the workplace and community, and opportunities and resources for aspiring leaders. Attendees will even have the opportunity to pose their own questions to panelists at the end. The event will take place via Zoom.


CERLAC presents The Michael Baptista Lecture Series 2021-2022 Envisioning Emancipatory Horizons in the Caribbean and Latin America: Unsilencing the Unthinkable - A Panel for Black History Month

Thursday, February 10, 2022

6:00pm-8:00pm

Register for Envisioning Emancipatory Horizons in the Caribbean and Latin America: Unsilencing the Unthinkable

In Silencing the Past (1995), Haitian historian Michel-Rolph Trouillot argued that the unthinkable is “that which one cannot conceive within the range of possible alternatives, that which perverts all answers because it defies the terms under which the questions were phrased.” 

He proposed the Haitian revolution was unthinkable because it was too radical to be formulated in advance of its deeds. What habits of thought, language, labour, identity divisions and knowledge sustain unthinkable(s) in the present and the region(s)? What transnational solidarities are needed in the here and now to challenge the enduring legacies and reinventions of colonial divisions and the deeply divisive, unequal, violent and hierarchical systems which threaten us? What might we learn from the Black struggles of the past and groups already at work on alternatives in different spaces? How are visual artists, writers and performers prefiguring imminent possibility? 

In this panel scholars, activists and artists reflect on unthinkable(s) in the historical and contemporary social, racial, environmental, and political landscapes of the Caribbean and Latin America and, through their work imagine emancipatory horizons.  

Check out https://www.yorku.ca/about/blackhistorymonth/ for more events.

Black History Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon Editing Session #2

Friday, February 11, 2022

10:00am - 1:00 pm EST

Register for Editing Session #2

Every Friday in February, join your library for facilitated editing sessions on Zoom: you can learn the basics or get a refresher on editing Wikipedia and Wikidata, then learn and write alongside others who are passionate about improving digital coverage of Black histories and experiences. Register for the weekly editing sessions.

You can also join the event and edit at your own pace throughout the month. For full details, visit the Black History Edit-a-thon event page.

This event is organized by U of T Libraries, York University Libraries, X University Library, and Toronto Public Library. We look forward to seeing you!


Celebrate While We Educate: Panel Discussion

February 11, 2022

1:00pm-2:00pm

Register for Panel Discussion

Panel discussion featuring all Black Student Associations

#CWWE Presented by SCLD and the Black Student Associations

Carrying it with Us: Documenting Black Histories for the Future

Monday, February 14, 2022

12:30pm EST

Register for Carrying it with Us

Join Open Forum curator/moderator Kerry-Ann James in a special conversation with Selwyn Jacob, producer, and director of over 50 National Film Board films, Sylvia D. Hamilton, a Nova Scotian award-winning documentary filmmaker and writer, and Jennifer Holness, a documentary filmmaker, producer, and writer for a motivating discussion on archiving Black life in Canada through documentary film. This intimate conversation will remind us of the power and richness of Black history, presence, and future.

Guest Speakers:

Sylvia D. Hamilton is a Nova Scotian filmmaker, writer and artist raised in Beechville, a community established in Nova Scotia, by free Black Refugee-Survivors from the War of 1812. Her films include Black Mother Black Daughter, Speak It: From the Heart of Black Nova Scotia, Portia White: Think on Me and The Little Black School House, among others. They have been broadcast in Canada and screened at festivals at home and abroad and are widely used in schools and universities. Her poetry book, And I Alone Escaped to Tell You was short-listed for a 2015 League of Canadian Poets Award. and was a finalist for the Nova Scotia Masterworks Award. =Excavation/Here We Are Here, her multi-media installation, has been shown at galleries and museums in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec and Ontario. In 1990 she co-created New Initiatives in Film (NIF), a program within the National Film Board’s Studio D, to provide filmmaking opportunities for women of colour and Indigenous women filmmakers. She chaired the Board of the Women’s Television Network Foundation (WIMF) as well as many arts-related juries. She’s held memberships and board/committee positions in a variety of local and national organizations including the Documentary Organization of Canada (DOC) and the Canada Council’s Racial Equity Committee.

Jennifer Holness writes, produces, and directs and often on the same project! She is the first Black woman in Canada to win a CSA (Gemini) for best writing and is the 2021 Indiescreen Producer of the Year award-winner. Jen loves to make documentary films and she recently directed her first feature documentary, Subjects of Desire, about Black women, and beauty. The film had its world premiere at SXSW, followed by Hot Docs where it was a Top Ten Audience Favourite. The film will air on Starz in the US and TVO on February 1st 2022. Subjects of Desire was selected as a TIFF Top Ten Film. Jen also produced Stateless (2020 Hot Doc’s Special Jury Prize). Her dramatic features Home Again and Love, Sex and Eating the Bones have won numerous festival awards, including the Best First Canadian Feature Award at TIFF. Her TV documentaries include, Speakers For The Dead (CBC), Badge of Pride (CBC & PBS), Brick By Brick (Omni), Yin Yin Jade Love (TVO). She created the TV series, Shoot The Messenger and the multiple award winning mini-series, Guns for CBC where she won a shared Canadian Screen Award for Best Writing. Jen is a key part of numerous committees including the chair of the Black Screen Office and co-chair of CISF. She’s a CMPA board member and chair of the REDIAC Action Committee for the organization. Jen has also co-created the 4-part doc series BLK: An Origin Story for History which will premiere February 26, 2022.

Selwyn Jacob joined the National Film Board’s BC & Yukon Studio in 1997 and went on to produce over 50 NFB films. His many credits include Crazywater, directed by Inuvialuit filmmaker Dennis Allen; Hue: A Matter of Colour, directed by Vic Sarin; Mighty Jerome, written and directed by Charles Officer; and the digital interactive app Circa 1948, by Vancouver artist Stan Douglas. Jacob’s most recent feature documentary credits include Mina Shum’s Ninth Floor, about the infamous Sir George Williams Riot of 1969 that was selected to TIFF’s 2015 annual top ten list of best Canadian films, and Baljit Sangra’s Because We Are Girls, exploring the impact of sexual abuse on a conservative Indo-Canadian family living in small-town British Columbia. Selwyn retired from the NFB in June, 2019, and his last production was Now Is The Time, directed by Haida filmmaker, Christopher Auchter. Selwyn has since returned to the private sector as an independent Producer/Director.

Acknowledging and Addressing Racism

Tuesday, February 15, 2022

1:30pm-3:00pm

Register for Acknowledging and Addressing Racism

This workshop will help participants gain an understanding of how to recognize racism, how it can manifest, and what its impacts are. Participants will learn about strategies to address barriers to inclusive spaces, and become familiar with relevant tools, policies and legislation within the York context.

Learn more about REI's Anti-Racism Workshop Series


BOLD Ideas: A Conversation with Everett Lawrence (E.L.) Adams II, Hope for my Hippocampus: Black Mental Health Between the U.S./Canadian Border

Tuesday, February 15, 2022

6:00pm-7:30pm EST

Register for BOLD IDEAS here

Bold Ideas is a platform for citizens, activists and leaders to share their personal, career and life experiences and challenges with the community, and how they negotiated their life paths around these challenges. 

E.L. Adams II graduated from Tennessee Technological University in Cookeville, Tennessee with a master’s degree in Educational and Counseling Psychology. E. L. created programs based on his thesis to combine music and mental health, and to allow for deep and safe conversations. E. L. has supported adolescents, families, school boards and communities with mental health and encouraging others to get the support that they need to develop, grow and manage their well-being. In our Bold Ideas discussion, E.L. will discuss some of his experiences on both sides of the American and Canadian border. Given that the hippocampus plays a major role in learning and memory, E.L. hopes to share his unique account of a black experience from what is embedded in his hippocampus: the things he has learned and remembered that have had an impact on his own mental health. E.L.’s daily occurrences have shown him that there are more similarities than differences between the U.S. and Canadian borders when it comes to racism. Through his presentation, E.L. hopes to highlight how he has managed to preserve his peace and to continue functioning at an optimal level with hope that new memories can be created that include acceptance and value of a Black man.

#BLKPSYCH365 - Black Psychology and Community Psychology of the CPA

Wednesday, February 16th, 2022

11:00am-1:00pm

Register for #BLKPSYCH265

The Sections for Black Psychology and Community Psychology, Canadian Psychological Association (CPA) are excited to announce an upcoming event featuring Dr. Sonya Faber and Dr. Setorme Tsikata. Our theme is #BlkPsych365. We'll discuss new lessons for being a modern ally. During the Q&A several psychologists and therapists will be on hand to discuss Black Excellence and Black mental health. All are welcome! 

For any questions please contact: anita.shaw@unbc.ca 

Fostering Allyship and Anti-Racism Workshop

Thursday, February 17, 2022

TBA EST

Register for Fostering Allyship and Anti-Racism Workshop soon!

In partnership with United Caribbean Islands (UCI), York University's Black Students Association (YUBSA), Black Students in Psychology (BSIP) and Calumet and Stong Colleges.

Black History Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon Editing Session #3

Friday, February 18, 2022

1:00pm - 4:00 pm EST

Register for Editing Session #3

Every Friday in February, join your library for facilitated editing sessions on Zoom: you can learn the basics or get a refresher on editing Wikipedia and Wikidata, then learn and write alongside others who are passionate about improving digital coverage of Black histories and experiences. Register for the weekly editing sessions.

You can also join the event and edit at your own pace throughout the month. For full details, visit the Black History Edit-a-thon event page.

This event is organized by U of T Libraries, York University Libraries, X University Library, and Toronto Public Library. We look forward to seeing you!

FGS presents “Why Black History (Month) Matters”

Tuesday, February 22, 2022

12:00pm-1:15pm

Register for FGS presents "Why Black History (Month) Matters"

As we honour and celebrate Black History Month, there is importance in continuing the conversation around Black history, cultural and lived experiences.

Our moderator for this event is Dean & Associate-Vice President Graduate, Thomas Loebel. The panel will be made up of current faculty members and graduate scholars at York University.

This is a free event, however registration is required.

Have any questions? Please contact our Graduate Communications Manager, Anesa Albert at anesaa@yorku.ca.

Check out https://www.yorku.ca/about/blackhistorymonth/ for more events.

Intervening on Racism

Thursday, February 24, 2022

10:30am-12:00pm

Register for Intervening on Racism

Please note that we strongly recommend participants to have attended at least one of the workshops above before attending this session.

This workshop will be highly participation-based, and ask attendees to design strategies and practice tools to intervene on moments of racial discrimination, harassment, and microaggressions. Prior familiarity with these concepts is recommended.

Learn more about REI's Anti-Racism Workshop Series


Speed Painting: Black History Month

Thursday, February 24, 2022

3:00pm - 4:00 pm EST

Register for Speed Painting

During this session, you will learn how to make a quick painting! Speed Painting is a calm and easy way to learn the methods for making a painting. Painting is a fun way to express yourself artistically. Take a break, decompress and partake in this self-care-oriented workshop!

To participate in this workshop, participants will need to have the following items:
· Acrylic Paint (Black, White, Red, Blue and Yellow)
· Brushes (Small pointed brush, Medium and big flat brush, and Medium angle brush)
· Canvas or Paper (any size)
· Cup of water
· Tissues

Creative Arts workshops are an opportunity for community members to take a break, decompress and partake in self-care-oriented sessions.

Each workshop is facilitated by an artist that will guide you through lessons and/or activities where you can explore, learn, and develop skills across various artistic mediums including poetry, visual arts, photography, sewing, baking and more.

Black History Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon Editing Session #4

Friday, February 25, 2022

10:00am - 1:00 pm EST

Register for Editing Session #4

Every Friday in February, join your library for facilitated editing sessions on Zoom: you can learn the basics or get a refresher on editing Wikipedia and Wikidata, then learn and write alongside others who are passionate about improving digital coverage of Black histories and experiences. Register for the weekly editing sessions.

You can also join the event and edit at your own pace throughout the month. For full details, visit the Black History Edit-a-thon event page.

This event is organized by U of T Libraries, York University Libraries, X University Library, and Toronto Public Library. We look forward to seeing you!

York Circle @ Home: Cycles of inequality and exploitation in nation-building

Sunday, February 27, 2022

10:00am-12:00pm

Register for York Circle @ Home: Cycles of inequality and exploitation in nation-building

Hosted by Dr. Rebecca Pillai Riddell, Academic Chair of The York Circle, this virtual lecture series will showcase York’s leading faculty members engaging in lively panel discussions and Q&A sessions on key themes related to this year’s topic: “Oh Canada! The True North Strong and Free?” The series will be held over four sessions throughout the year.

Check out https://www.yorku.ca/about/blackhistorymonth/ for more events.

Orienting Yourself to Allyship

Monday, February 28, 2022

10:30am-12:00pm

Register for Orienting Yourself to Allyship

*Please Note: This session is a prerequisite for Allyship 2 that is offered on March 3, 2021*

In recognition of Black History Month and as the the kick of event of Inclusoin Week, 2022, this session offers a series of engaging activities and reflection exercises that challenge participants to:

  • Contextualize their social location based on their identity.
  • Deepen their understanding of allyship in a personal and institutional setting.
  • Practice active allyship and develop strategies to have brave conversations.

This workshop is developed and delivered in partnership with Student Community Leadership and Development (SCLD).

Learn more about REI's Anti-Racism Workshop Series