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Faculty Associates

> Vijay Agnew > Tania Ahmad
> Russ Patrick Alcedo > Russell Belk
> Himani Bannerji > Gregory Chin
> Kabita Chakraborty > Lily Cho
> Patrick Darkhor > Raju Das
> Lisa Drummond > Enakshi Dua
> Joshua Fogel > Margo Gewurtz
> Pietro Giordan > Theodore (Ted) Goossen
> Jay Goulding > Shubhra Gururani
> Laam Hae > Sharon Hayashi
> Susan Henders > Zulfikar Hirji
> Jennifer Hyndman > Joan Judge
> Hong Kal > Ilan Kapoor
> Ali Kazimi > Philip Kelly
> Ann Kim > Janice Kim
> Thomas Klassen > Sailaja Krishnamurti
> Min-Jung Kwak > Janet Tai Landa
> Jessica Li > Jinyan Li
> Lucia Lo > Bernard Luk
> Jia Ma > Sadia Mariam Malik
> Guida Man > Radhika Mongia
> Jean Michel Montsion > Arun Mukherjee
> Ananya Mukherjee-Reed > Chandan Narayan
> Michael Nijhawan > Shobna Nijhawan
> Mona Oikawa > Hyun Ok Park
> Pooja Parmar > Valerie Preston
> Fahim Quadir > Robin Roth
> Janet Rubinoff > Trichy Sankaran
> Albert Schrauwers > Sharada Srinivasan
> Yukari Takai > Alicia Turner
> Penny Van Esterik > Peter Vandergeest
> Bernard Wolf > Wendy S. Wong
> Yuk-lin Renita Wong > Lorna Wright
> Xueqing Xu > Qiang Zha

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Vijay Agnew

Vijay Agnew, PhD
Professor, Department of Social Science
York University

Vijay Agnew is the author of Women's Health, Women's Rights: Perspectives on Global Health Issues (2003), Gender, Home and Nation: A Century of Writings on South Asian Women (2003), Where I Come From (2003), Resisting Discrimination: Women from Asia, Africa and the Caribbean and the Women's Movement in Canada (1996). The latter won the Gustav Myers Award as an "outstanding book on the subject of human rights in North America." She specializes in feminist issues, gender and diversity as well as international migration and identity.

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Russ Patrick R. Alcedo

Russ Patrick R. Alcedo, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Dance
York University

Patrick Alcedo is a dance ethnographer and a specialist on Philippine traditional dances. His work focuses on performance of gender, folklorization of religion, and world dance in the diaspora. Under the auspices of the Asian Cultural Council, he received his PhD in Dance History and Theory from the University of California, Riverside, where he also did his postdoctoral fellowship with the Southeast Asian, Text, Ritual, and Performance (SEATRiP).
In 2007, he took residence at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C. as a Rockefeller Humanities Fellow in Theorizing Cultural Heritage.

Born and raised in Aklan, Philippines, his research on the socio-economic conditions of aspiring boxers in that province resulted in Boxing To Be The Next Pacquiao, a video project he produced with The New York Times.

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Himani BanerjiHimani Bannerji , PhD
Professor, Department of Sociology
York University

Himani Bannerji is a Professor in the Department of Sociology. Her research and writing life extends between Canada and India. Her interests encompass anti-racist feminism, marxism, critical cultural theories and historical sociology. She has done extensive research and writing on patriarchy and class formation in colonial India as well as in different strands of nationalism, cultural identity and politics in India.

Her PhD research on class formation and left cultural politics, particularly on Indian Peoples Theatre Assocation (IPTA) resulted in a book, The Mirror of Class: Essays on Bengali Theatre (Papyrus Publishers, Kolkata 1998). She then continued research on the growing role played by middle class women in shaping the class consciousness and identity formations of the Bengali middle classes. This resulted in a book of essays, Inventing Subjects: Studies in Hegemony, Patriarchy and Colonialism (Tulika, India/Anthem, London 2001). Her further research on the connection between religion, politics and patriarchy and violence against women resulted in the book Demography and Democracy: Essays on Nationalism, Gender and Ideology (Orient Blackswan, India/ Canadian Scholars Press, Toronto 2011). She also co-edited and contributed with S. Mojab and J. Whitehead a volume of essays titled Of Property and Propriety: The Role of Gender and Class in Imperialism and Nationalism (University of Toronto Press, 2001).

Other than these writings on South Asia in particular, Dr. Bannerji has written on Canada from an anti-racist feminist and marxist perspective books such as The Writing on the Wall: Essays on Culture and Politics (TSAR, Toronto 1993), Thinking Through: Essays of Feminism, Marxism and Anti-racism (Women’s Press, Toronto 1995), The Dark Side of the Nation: Essays on Multiculturalism, Nationalism and Racism (Canadian Scholars Press, Toronto 2000), and edited and contributed to one of the earliest volumes on antiracist feminism, Returning Gaze: Essays on Gender, Race and Class by Non-white Women (Sister Vision Press, Toronto 1993). Her current research interest is on the social thought of Rabindranath Tagore, a volume forthcoming in 2013.

Other than writing and research, Dr. Bannerji is one of the founders and life fellow of the School of Women’s Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata and an honourary visiting professor and general council member of International Development Studies Kolkata (IDSK). She has been the recipient of a senior fellowship grant for research on Rabindranath Tagore from Rabindra Bhavan, Visva Bharati, Santiniketan. She has taught in Delhi University, Department of Sociology, Jadavpur University, School of Women’s Studies and Department of Comparative Literature, and Calcutta University, School of Women’s Studies, on a regular basis. Dr. Bannerji has been awarded the Tagore Memorial Prize (Rabindra Smriti Puraskar) from the Government of West Bengal’s literary academy for her work on social and cultural history of Bengal. She has presented as a keynote and plenary speaker on numerous occasions, including as the keynote for the all-India body of Rammohan Roy Library Foundations. She has taught the core course on South Asia in York’s South Asia Studies Programme for a number of years, and continues to introduce both undergraduate and graduate students to South Asian colonial and post-colonial writings. Her graduate courses, Theorizing Modernity and Social and Moral Regulations, also concentrate on the question of different modernities in post-colonial societies.

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Russell Belk
Russell Belk, PhD
Professor, Marketing
Schulich School of Business
York University

Russell Belk is the Kraft Foods Canada Chair in Marketing at the Schulich School of Business. He received his PhD in Marketing from the University of Minnesota in 1972. He is past president of the Association for Consumer Research and the International Association of Marketing and Development, and is a fellow in the Association for Consumer Research and the American Psychological Association. He has received the Paul D. Converse Award, two Fulbright Fellowships, and honorary professorships on four continents. In 2005 he received the Sheth Foundation/Journal of Consumer Research Award for Long Term Contribution to Consumer Research.

Besides York, he has also taught at the University of Utah, University of Illinois, Temple University, Claremont Graduate University, and universities in Eastern and Western Europe, Asia, Africa, New Zealand and Australia. During the 2009.2010 academic year, Professor Belk was a Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the University of Hong Kong.

His research involves the meanings of possessions, collecting, gift-giving, and materialism and his work is often cultural, visual, qualitative, and interpretive. He is the co-founder of the Association for Consumer Research Film Festival. He is currently on the editorial board of 20 journals, has over 400 publications and is Associate Editor of the Journal of Consumer Research.

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Kabita Chakraborty
Kabita Chakraborty, PhD
Assistant Professor, Children's Studies programme
York University

Kabita Chakraborty is an assistant professor in the Children’s Studies programme at York University. She has been a research fellow at the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, the University of Melbourne, the Nossal Institute for Global Health, the University of Wollongong, and the Centre for Studies in Social Sciences in India. Kabita has also been a lecturer at the University of Queensland and the University of Malaya in Malaysia before joining York University. Her research interests include the everyday lives of young women and children in the urban slums of South Asia, the sexual and reproductive health of young people, Islamic girlhoods and boyhoods, women’s migration in a globalizing Asia and qualitative research methods with children. Her first book 'Young Muslim Women in India: Bollywood, Identity and Changing Lives' is being published by Routledge.

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Lily Cho, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of English
York University

Lily Cho, Associate Professor in the Department of English at York University, conducts research on diasporic subjectivity within the fields of cultural studies, postcolonial literature and theory, and Asian North American and Canadian literature. Her book, Eating Chinese: Culture on the Menu in Small Town Canada (2010) examines the relationship between Chinese restaurants and Canadian culture. She is currently working on photographs that appear on Chinese Canadian head tax certificates; she is also co-editor, with Jody Berland, of TOPIA:Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies.

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Raju Das
Raju J. Das, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Geography
York University

Raju J. Das teaches in the Geography department. His research interests are in: Marxist theory, political economy of development, state-society relations, social movements and social-cultural norms of the working class. His regional interest is in India.

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Lisa Drummond
Lisa Drummond, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Social Science
York University

Lisa Drummond is Associate Professor of Urban Studies at York University in Toronto, Canada.

After living and working in Hanoi, Vietnam in the early 1990s, she completed a degree in Human Geography at the Australia National University and held a postdoctoral fellowship at the National University of Singapore.

Professor Drummond's research focuses primarily on urban social life in Vietnam, including analyses of popular culture, specifically in television serials and women's magazines, women's roles in Vietnamese society, and the application of western concepts such as public and private to the use of space in Vietnamese cities.

Her publications include several co-edited books, most recently Consuming Urban Culture in Contemporary Vietnam, with Mandy Thomas, and Gender Practices in Contemporary Vietnam, with Helle Rydstrom. In 2008.2009, Professor Drummond was on a Faculty of Arts Research Leave working on a book based on my research in public space in Hanoi from the French colonial period to the present. Her next project will focus on Hanoi during the Subsidy Era, 1954-1985.

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Joshua Fogel

Joshua Fogel , PhD
Professor, Department of History
York University

Born in Brooklyn, raised in Berkeley, college at the University of Chicago (BA 1972), MA and PhD at Columbia University (1980), with graduate student study at Kyoto University (1976-87), taught at Harvard University (1981-88) and the University of California, Santa Barbara (1989-2005), with visiting stints at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton (2001-03), Kyoto University (1996-97), British Inter-University China Centre (2007), and Kansai University (2008), Josh Fogel has lived and worked all over the place. Trained initially in Chinese history, he developed an abiding interest in Japanese history, too, and after many years of language study, found a way to integrate the two: the study of Sino-Japanese relations (cultural and political).

His first major project was a biographical study of Japan premier prewar Sinologist, Naito Konan, which appeared in 1984 as Politics and Sinology: The Case of Naito Konan (1866-1934). Subsequent work has tended to focus on the dynamic interaction between these two cultural spheres. His sixth single-author book, Articulating the Sinosphere: Place and Time in Sino-Japanese Relations, was published by Harvard University Press in spring 2009. He has also published 17 edited volumes and 14 volumes of translation, with three more in press. For 15 years, he served as editor-in-chief of Sino-Japanese Studies (1989-2004), which was revived as an online journal in 2009 and for which he now serves as editor again.

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Margo GewurtzMargo Gewurtz, PhD
Professor, Department of Humanities
York University

Margo Gewurtz has held several senior administrative posts including Associate Director of the Toronto-York Joint Center for Asia-Pacific Studies, Chair of the Division of Humanities, Vice-Chair of Senate and Master of Founders College. Her research interests are in the field of Sino-Western cultural relations.

She is co-author of Guide to Canadian Archival Sources on Missionaries in East Asia (1989) and author of Between America & Russia: Chinese Student Radicalism & Travel Books of Tsou T'ao-Fen (1975). She has published numerous essays on Canadian China missionaries and their Chinese coworkers.

Her recent publication is “The Afterlife of Memory in China: Yang Jiang’s Literary Memoir”, published in ARIEL, Life Writing in International Contexts Issue v.39 (1-2).

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Ted GoossenTheodore (Ted) Goossen, PhD
Professor, Department of Humanities
York University

Ted Goossen is a professor in the Department of Humanities. His interests lie largely in modern and contemporary Japanese literature, the Asian Canadian experience, Asian film and cross-cultural analysis.

He is editor of The Oxford Book of Japanese Short Stories, and has translated numerous modern and contemporary Japanese writers. His most recent activities include articles and translations in Brick (Toronto), Monkey Business (Tokyo), a dialogue with Motoyuki Shibata in Subaru (Tokyo).

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Jay Goulding
Jay Goulding, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Social Science
York University

Jay Goulding is Associate Professor in the Department of Social Science. His expertise is in classical and modern Chinese and Japanese philosophy, religion and culture as well as hermeneutic phenomenology.

He has published in Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Sociological Analysis: A Journal of Comparative Religion, Political Theory, Catalyst, Anhui Normal University Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities, Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy, Journal of Chinese Philosophy, China Review International, and Beijing University's Gate of Philosophy. In 2005, he contributed to Scribner's New Dictionary of the History of Ideas encyclopedia with entries on East Asian philosophy, religion and culture in both ancient and modern perspectives.

In 2006, he gave guest lectures at Beijing Foreign Studies University and the Institute of Foreign Philosophy, Beijing University on the interaction of Daoism (Laozi, Zhuangzi) with phenomenology (Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty). He has recently completed an edited book titled China-West Interculture, Toward the Philosophy of World Integration: Essays on Wu Kuang-ming’s Thinking for The Association of Chinese Philosophers in America (ACPA) Series on Chinese and Comparative Philosophy (Global Scholarly Publications).

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Shubhra Gururani
Shubhra Gururani, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology
York University

Professor Gururani’s research explores the social histories and cultural politics of gender, nature, place, and science as they unfold in postcolonial settings like India. Interested in the cultural politics of power, knowledge, and difference, she draws from feminist and postcolonial theory, science and technology studies, and political ecology to analyse the material and symbolic co-production of nature, race, gender, caste, and ethnicity in India.

Through archival and extensive ethnographic research in the Himalayas, her research contests the ontological divide between nature and society and demonstrates how nature is not merely the ground for environmental conflicts or a ‘resource,’ as it is commonly assumed, but is constitutive of everyday practices of labour, livelihood, knowledge, and subjectivity.

Her interest in the cultural politics of nature is not limited to the rural and extends to new urban spaces in India. She is conducting research on the urban political ecology of water and sewage in the Millennial city of India, Gurgaon and is currently part of a SSHRC-funded Major Collaborative Research Initiative (MCRI) on Global Suburbanisms, in which she is the Team Lead for South Asia as well as for Waste and Sewage Infrastructure.

Her papers have been published in Journal of Peasant Studies, International Journal of Social Sciences, and Gender, Place and Culture.

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Laam HaeLaam Hae, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
York University

Laam Hae studies and teaches urban political economy, cultural politics, critical race theory and feminist methodology. More specifically, Professor Hae has researched popular struggles over gentrification, the post-industrialization of urban economies, city marketing, zoning regulations, the militarization of urban space and “the right to the city,” both in North America and East Asia (specializing particularly in South Korea).

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Susan Henders
Susan Henders, DPhil
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
York University

Susan Henders specializes in the international and domestic politics of eastern Asia. Her Asia-focused research looks at the international politics and political economy of minority rights; territorial politics in culturally diverse societies; human rights and the arts; and the roles of societal actors in Canada-Asia relations.

Among her publications are “‘Other Diplomacies’ and the Making of Canada-Asian Relations”, Canadian Foreign Policy Journal 18(3)(2012): 375-388 (co-authored with Mary M. Young; winner of the journal’s Maureen Molot Best Paper Prize, 2012); “Assessing hybridity in the People’s Republic of China: The impact of post-Mao decentralization” in John Loughlin, Wilfried Swenden, and John Kincaid, eds., The Routledge Handbook on Regionalism and Federalism (Routledge, in press); Territoriality, Asymmetry, and Autonomy: Catalonia, Corsica, Hong Kong, and Tibet (Palgrave 2010); and Democratization and Identity: Constituting Regimes and Ethnicity in East and South-East Asia (Lexington, 2004, 2006).

A former Director of the York Centre for Asian Research, she has taught at St. John's College, University of Oxford and at the University of Toronto and was a visiting professor at K.U. Leuven (the University of Leuven) in Belgium.  Henders received her DPhil from Oxford and her MPhil at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

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Zulfikar Hirji
Zulfikar Hirji, DPhil
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology
York University

As an anthropologist and social historian Zulfikar Hirji is interested in how human societies articulate, represent and perform understandings of self, community and other. His research focuses on Muslim societies in a range of historical and contemporary contexts. He is particularly concerned with the
diverse ways in which Muslims express and articulate issues of deep human concern as well as matters of daily life. He also interrogates knowledge produced about Muslims, by academics and others.

His research interests have lead him to study a range of issues including the production and performance of identity, the roles of art, artists and cultural workers in making social change, the dynamics of family networks and inter-generational migration, the socio-legal formation of communal identity in colonial and nationalist contexts and in religiously plural societies. He has conducted archival research and multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork in various parts of the world including East Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, South Asia, Europe and North America.

He has published his research in a number of journals, encyclopaedic works and books. He is co-author and editor of The Ismailis, an Illustrated History (2008), editor of Diversity and Pluralism in Muslim Contexts (2010) and Between Empires (2012). ‘Pushpanjali: a sensory invocation’ (2011) is his first
film and is part of an on-going research project on the life and work of Tehreema Mitha.

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Jennifer HyndmanJennifer Hyndman, PhD
Associate Professor, Departments of Political Science and Geography
York University

Jennifer Hyndman is Professor in Social Science and Geography at York University and Associate Director of Research at the Centre for Refugee Studies. Her research focuses on the geopolitics and securitization of forced migration from conflict zones and refugee camps in Sri Lanka and Kenya to resettlement in North America. She is the author of Dual Disasters: Humanitarian Aid after the 2004 Tsunami (2011), Managing Displacement: Refugees and the Politics of Humanitarianism (University of Minnesota Press, 2000), co-editor of Sites of Violence: Gender and Conflict Zones (University of California Press, 2004), among other publications.

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Joan Judge
Joan Judge, PhD
Professor, Department of History
York University

Joan Judge received her PhD from Columbia University in 1993. Her most recent publication is The Precious Raft of History: The Past, the West, and the Woman Question in China (Stanford University Press, 2008). She is also the author of Print and Politics: ‘Shibao’ and the Culture of Reform in Late Qing China (Stanford University Press, 1996) and of numerous articles on Chinese print culture and Chinese women. She taught at the University of California, Santa Barbara, before moving to Toronto in 2005 and is currently Professor of History at York University. She has spent several years in East Asia both gathering sources and sharing her research findings with Chinese and Japanese colleagues. Her current research project is A New Approach to the Popular Press in China: Gender and Cultural Production, 1904-1937.

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Hong Kal
Associate Professor, Visual Arts
Faculty of Fine Arts
York University

Hong Kal teaches art and cultural histories of Korea and East Asia. Her current research explores urban spectacles and politics of exhibitions in relation to issues of nationalism and neoliberal globalization. Her research has been supported by Advanced Research Grant from Korea Foundation (2007-2008) and SSHRC Standard Grant (2010-2013). She is the author of Aesthetic Constructions of Korean Nationalism: Spectacle, Politics and History (Routledge, 2011).

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Ilan Kapoor

Ilan Kapoor, PhD
Professor, Faculty of Environmental Studies
York University

Ilan Kapoor is a Professor and Undergraduate Programme Director at the Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University.

His teaching and research focus on critical development studies, postcolonial studies, participatory development, and democratic theory. His geographic areas of interest include South Asia (especially India and Pakistan). He is the author of The Postcolonial Politics of Development (Routledge, 2008).

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Philip F. Kelly

Philip Kelly, PhD
Director, York Centre for Asian Research
Professor, Department of Geography
York University

Philip Kelly's research focuses on Filipino transnational migration and labour market experiences in Canada, and the transformative effects of migration on economic, cultural and political life in the Philippines. His broader research interests relate to the political economy of development in Southeast Asia, with particular reference to labour regulation, industrialization and urbanization.

He is the author of Landscapes of Globalisation: Human Geographies of Economic Change in the Philippines (2000), co-editor of Globalization and the Asia-Pacific: Contested Territories (1999), and co-author of Economic Geography: A Contemporary Introduction (2007).

He is co-investigator in the SSHRC-MCRI project on the ‘Challenges of Agrarian Transitions in Southeast Asia’ (2005-2010), and Principal Investigator of a SSHRC Knowledge Impact in Society project called the 'Toronto Immigrant Employment Data Initiative' (2008-2010).

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Ann H. Kim
Ann Kim, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
York University

Ann H. Kim is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology. Prior to joining York in 2006, she worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Toronto. She received her PhD in Sociology from Brown University, where she was a trainee at the Population Studies and Training Center. She also holds a MSW from the University of Toronto, where she specialized in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies.

Her research is largely motivated by questions related to the immigrant and ethnic integration process and to the spatial manifestations of urban inequality. Among these interests, she studies Asian immigrant integration in North America, particularly exploring the emergence and effect of panethnicity. More recently, she has developed an active program of research on the Korean community in Canada, ranging from issues related to the housing and living arrangements of Korean seniors to Korean immigrant entrepreneurship.

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Janice C.H. Kim
Janice Kim
, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of History
York University

Janice C. H. Kim is an associate professor of History at York University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  Born in Seoul and raised in the Washington D.C. area, Dr. Kim has a BA and MA in History from The Johns Hopkins University (1996) and a MA in East Asian Studies (1997) and PhD in History from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, U.K. (2001).

Among her published articles and book chapters are: "The Pacific War and Working Women in Late-Colonial Korea," Signs 33:1 (Fall 2007), 81-104, “The Varieties of Women’s Wage Work in Colonial Korea,” The Review of Korean Studies, 10:3 (June 2007), 119-146, “Processes of Feminine Power: Shamans in Central Korea,” in Keith Howard, ed., Korean Shamanism: Revivals, Survivals and Change (Seoul: The Royal Asiatic Society, Korea Branch, 1998), 113-133, and “Labor Mobilization in Late-Colonial Korea, 1937-1945,” in Andre Schmid, ed., Reader on Colonial Korea, Columbia University Press, forthcoming.  Her book, To Live to Work: Factory Women in Colonial Korea, 1910-1945 (Stanford University Press, 2009) concerns the popular expansion of gender, labour and political consciousness among working women in colonial Korea. In this work she examines Japanese imperialism and the interplays between domestic events and the broader social and economic changes brought on by the First World War, the Depression and the Pacific War.  She is currently working on a book manuscript tentatively entitled, “Between Mountains: Refugee Life during the Korean War,” which explores the social and economic history of refugees and civilian livelihood during and after the Korean War.  Plans for future research include a study of affection, labour and the moral economy, in developing South Korea, from the 1960s to the 1980s. 

She has been the recipient of grants and fellowships sponsored by the Association for Asian Studies, Northeast Asia Council, the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Korea Foundation, and the British Council.

 

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Thomas Klassen

Thomas Klassen
, PhD
Professor, Department of Political Science and School of Public Policy and Administration
York University

Professor Klassen is the author and editor of several books dealing with labour market policy. His most recent co-edited volume is Korea’s Retirement Predicament: The Ageing Tiger (Routledge 2013). He is also co-editor of Retirement, Work and Pensions in Ageing Korea (Routledge 2010),

During 2006-2007, he was Visiting Professor at Yonsei University in Seoul, South Korea. In 2011 he was Invited Visiting Researcher at the Korea Labor Institute. His current research interest is on income security policy, and the welfare state, in comparative context, particularly South Korea.

In 2013 he joined a small group of York University professors beginning a five-year multi-million dollar international development project in Dhaka (Bangladesh), Hyderabad (India) and Katmandu (Nepal). Funded by the Canadian International Development Agency, the project will improve employment opportunities and rights for people with disabilities. A video outlining the project can be found here.

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Janet Landa

 

Janet Tai Landa, PhD
Professor, Department of Economics
York University

Janet Landa teaches law-and-economics and public choice at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The focus of her research interest for over two decades has been in the law-and-economic analysis of extra-legal institutions for achieving social order such as social norms embedded in ethnic trading networks and gift exchange.

She has published extensively on trust, ethnicity and identity of Chinese merchants in Southeast Asia, a topic which formed the central focus of her work on the "Economics of Identity". The earliest paper in the “Economic of Identity” is her widely cited 1981 paper entitled “ A Theory of the Ethnically Homogeneous Middleman Group: An Institutional Alternative to Contract Law”  The Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 10(2):349-362. This paper is reprinted in her book, Trust, Ethnicity, and Identity: Beyond the New Institutional Economics of Ethnic Trading Networks, Contract Law, and Gift-Exchange (1998).

More recently, her research interest has expanded to include the bioeconomic analysis of non-human and human societies and she was the founding Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Bioeconomics, an international scholarly journal that integrates economics with biology, launched in 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers, now merged with Springer.

Currently, she is completing a book manuscript, titled Chinese Merchants and their Ethnic Trade Networks, made possible by a York University Faculty of Arts Fellowship. "Economic Success of Ethnically Homogeneous Middleman Diasporas in the Provision of Club Goods: The Role of Culture, Religion, Ethnic Identity, and Ethnic Boundary” will be published in March 2013 in Diaspora as a Resource: Comparative studies in Strategies, Networks and Urban Space (eds. W. Kokot, C. Giordano and M. Gandelsman).

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Jessica Tsui Yan Li

Jessica Tsui Yan Li, PhD
Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics
York University

Jessica Tsui Yan Li is a Faculty Associate at the York Centre for Asian Research at York University. She is also affiliated with the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto. Her major research areas are on modern Chinese literature and film, Hong Kong studies, gender studies, comparative literature, translation theories, stage and film adaptations, feminine in Chinese culture and Asian North American literature, drama and film.

Her articles have appeared in the refereed journals, Neohelicon and Perspectives: Studies in Translatology, and in the books titled, Ibsen and the Modern Self, Gender, Discourse and the Self in Literature: Issues in Mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong and Asia: Local and Global Perspectives. She is currently working on a book manuscript on Eileen Chang’s self-writing, self-translations and adaptation.

Professor Li received her doctoral degrees from the University of Toronto and the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She also received a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) postdoctoral fellowship. She had taught at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and the University of Toronto. She is currently teaching at York University.

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Lucia Lo

Lucia Lo, PhD
Professor and Chair, Department of Geography
York University

Professor Lo's research interests spans many areas. Her diaspora work focuses primarily on immigrant settlement and integration issues. She uses a political economy approach to examine changing settlement patterns, immigrant business structures, and labour market performance of diverse immigrant groups. She has published extensively on Toronto's diverse Chinese community, including their consumer behaviour. She also extends her interest on consumer behaviour to explore the impact of international retailing and modern retail formats on consumption in China and India. Her current work on immigration and settlement focuses on immigrant service provision, and the role of ethnic/foreign banks on immigrant integration.

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Lucia Lo
Jia Ma, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics
York University

Dr. Ma is now a tenure track Assistant Professor in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics. His most important publication is Wandering under the Cross: Christian Culture and Modern Chinese Literature (1995). Dr. Ma studies modern Chinese literature, Chinese North American diasporic literature and Chinese history. He takes particular interest in Christian cultural influences on Chinese literature. He has published sixteen journal articles and five books.

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Sadia Mariam Malik, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Economics
York University

Sadia Mariam Malik is Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics. With a PhD degree in Economics from Kansas State University, she holds a diverse professional experience that includes teaching, research, and policy advocacy. Her research interests include health economics, human development and capabilities, poverty, conflict, and climate change. In past, she has served as Director, Mahbub ul Haq Human Development Centre based in Islamabad, Pakistan, which is a premier policy research institute and a think tank committed to organizing professional research in the area of human development in South Asia. At the Centre, Dr. Malik was involved in the preparation of annual reports on human development in South Asia. Published by Oxford University Press, these reports provide an in-depth analysis of various issues related to human development in South Asia such as education, health, poverty, trade, technology and the crisis of governance.

Dr. Malik has also won several research grants from national and international organizations including the World Bank, International Labour Organization and the Department for International Development, U.K.

 

Guida Man, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
York University

Guida Man is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology, Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies at York University. She is a Faculty Associate of the Centre for Feminist Research and the York Centre for Asian Research, and an Affiliate of CERIS-The Ontario Metropolis Centre.

Her research interest encompasses the interactions of globalization, transnational migration, gender, work, and social inequality, as they are articulated to gender, race and class relations. She has conducted a number of research studies concerning Chinese immigrants in Canada, addressing such issues as transnationalism, families, gender relations, employment, and integration. Currently, she is the Principal Investigator of a research entitled “Transnational Migration Trajectories of Immigrant Women Professionals in Canada: Strategies of Work and Family” funded by SSHRC Standard Research Grant (2009-13). She has published extensively in her area of specialization, and is presently co-editing a book project entitled Transnational Voices: Global Migration and the Experiences of Women, Youth and Children.

 

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Jena Michel MontsionJean Michel Montsion, PhD
Assistant Professor, International Studies
Glendon College, York University

Jean Michel's research focuses the implications of community-based politics in the development of gateway strategies between "Asian" and "Western" societies. From global cities like Singapore and Vancouver to Canadian Northern communities, he investigates the success of internationalizing specific locations and sectors as 'gateways' based on an everyday life and ethnographic approach. His recent research interests include the roles of aboriginal peoples in shaping Canada-Asia connections.

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Michael Nijhawan

Michael Nijhawan, DPhil
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
York University

After receiving his DPhil in Anthropology from the University of Heidelberg, Michael Nijhawan began his academic career in an interdisciplinary research project on 'Ritual Dynamics' at the University of Heidelberg, Germany. In 2006, he accepted a position as an assistant professor in Sociology at York. His research focuses primarily on violence and suffering and its translatability in cultural practices. His second research interest is on transnational religion, immigration and identity formation. He has an in-depth specialization in Sikh communities in Punjab province of India and the Sikh diaspora in Europe. He has conducted research in South Asia (Punjab) and Europe (Sikhs and Ahmadis).

He is the author of Dhadi Darbar. Religion, Violence, and the Performance of Sikh History (Oxford University Press, 2006), a number of refereed and non refereed articles as well as book chapters, in both English and German. He is also co-producer of the documentary 'Musafer-Sikhi is Travelling' (2008). Shared Idioms, Sacred Symbols, and the Articulation of Identities in South Asia has recently been published.

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Shobna Nijhawan

Shobna Nijhawan, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics
York University

Dr. Shobna Nijhawan is an Assistant Professor of Hindi in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics. Please visit www.yorku.ca/shobna/ for further information.

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Hyun Ok Park

Hyun Ok Park, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
York University

My work as a sociologist encompasses interdisciplinary engagement with the philosophy of history, the crisis of capitalism, and the epistemological issues associated with comparative studies.

My archival and ethnographic research concerns Korean transnational labour migration to and from northeast China, a border area known as Manchuria and the Balkans of Asia, at two historical moments--the first half of the twenty century and the current post-cold war period. I compare political cultures and social practices of community, sovereignty, and rights in the contexts of the nation-state system, the advent of global capitalism, and geopolitics. My research compares different periods not as discrete moments but as interdependent units formed through historical memories and the concept of history. Asia and diaspora as the site of my work leads me to explore the comparability of modernity of places, center and margin, and west and rest.

Professor Park's recent publications include: “The Politics of Korean Unification and Neoliberal Democracy” in Sonia Ryang (ed.), North Korea: Towards a Better Understanding (Lexington Books/Rowman and Littlefield Press, 2009); a review of Namhee Lee's The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea (Cornell University Press, 2007) in Contemporary Sociology; and “The Rights of the Colonial Returnees,” in Jesook Song (ed.), New Millennium South Korea: Neoliberalism (Routledge Press, forthcoming).  

With the working title of Neoliberal Democracy: Korean Transnational Labor Migration, History, the Post-Cold War Asia, her new book in progress brings the variant nexus of national, human, ethnic, and labor rights into dialogue with the politics of neoliberal democracy and history. It explores the historical change of sovereignty not as axiomatic postmodernity but rather as a product of the politics of history.

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Fahim Quadir

Fahim Quadir, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Social Science
York University

Fahim Quadir specializes in comparative politics, international development relations and political economy. His research focuses on civil society and democratization, development planning and management, economic liberalization and globalization, governance and human development, micro-finance, NGOs, and regionalism.

To date, he has co-edited three books, namely: Democracy and civil society in Asia: globalization, democracy, and civil society in Asia (2004), Democracy and civil society in Asia: democratic transitions and social movements in Asia (2004), and Crises of governance in Asia and Africa (2001). He has also published a number of articles relating to corporate capitalism, market reforms, social movements, structural adjustments, human security and regional development.

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Robin Roth

Robin Roth,
PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Geography
York University

Robin Roth's research interests include the political ecology of conservation with a particular focus on mountain environments of Asia, rural livelihood change, indigenous knowledge and spatiality, integrated social-ecological analysis and park-people conflicts. Her current project investigates the ways in which rural residents in highland Thailand, both individually and collectively, use emerging markets to reorganize their livelihoods in response to protected area establishment and explores the implications for social equity and environmental conservation.

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Janet Rubinoff

Janet Rubinoff, PhD
Department of Humanities
York University

Janet Rubinoff is a social/cultural anthropologist, with a field specialty in Indian culture, history and modern society. She teaches a Foundations Course on Indian culture and the arts from ancient to modern times. She also has taught Modern Indian History and Introduction to South Asian Studies (for Social Sciences). The latter is the core course for the South Asian Studies Program and has focused on nation and state building since independence in five states of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka. Her main research interest is on fisheries development in India and South Asia, with specific studies on fisherwomen in the markets, backwater fish farming (both indigenous ponds and modern shrimp farming), and on issues of globalization and marine fisheries management in India.

She has done consulting work on fish farming methods and feasibility development projects as well as presented and published papers on backwater aquaculture, female entrepreneurship in fishing communities of Goa, and management issues and legal pluralism in the fisheries of South Goa district (the latter part of a three-year IDPAD research project on fisheries management in South Asia).

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Trichy SankaranTrichy Sankaran
Professor, Department of Music
Faculty of Fine Arts
York University

Professor Trichy Sankaran is a world-renowned percussion virtuoso, Indian music scholar and composer, and the founding director of Indian music studies at York University.

Over the years, Prof. Sankaran has bridged eastern and western pedagogical styles and has influenced generations of students who have become noted performers, composers, and music educators themselves. He has given numerous lecture demonstrations and workshops at various universities in Canada, U.S., Europe, Southeast Asia, and India. He has made valuable contributions to many scholarly conferences across North America and has published numerous articles and two notable textbooks on South Indian classical drumming and the art of Konnakkol (rhythm solfege).

Trichy Sankaran has performed at major festivals in India, Southeast Asia, Europe, Australia and North America. In his more than 55 years of concert experience in Carnatic music, he has performed with all top rank artists of India. He has played in jugalbandhis (North-South combo) with famous Hindustani musicians. In addition to his usual traditional settings, he has performed with Nexus, gamelan, jazz, electronic, African music ensembles and world drums, as well as his own group, Trichy's Trio.

As a composer, Trichy Sankaran has to his credit numerous pieces in the genres of gamelan, jazz, traditional western classical orchestra, South Indian dance and world music ensembles. He continues to perform and write compositions for contemporary and world music ensembles. He has released many CDs. His recordings include Laya Vinyas (1990), Sunada (1993), Lotus Signatures (1997), Ivory Ganesh Meets Doctor Drums (1998), Catch 21 (2002), and Gaja Leela (2005).

Prof. Sankaran has received numerous honours and awards for his contributions to University teaching and artistic excellence in the professional field. These include recipient of the title 'Sangita Kalanidhi' and Award from the Music Academy, Madras (one of the highest honours that is bestowed upon an artist of eminence by the Academy each year) as well as the degree of Doctorate in Music for his outstanding achievements in the academic and professional fields from the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada in 1998. He is also a recipient of the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations Award for teaching excellence (1992), and the Professional of the Year Award by the Indo-Canada Chamber of Commerce (1998) for artistic excellence.

Prof. Sankaran has made a contribution of unique range and scope to the Indian artistic community and to Canadian musical culture. He has dedicated himself for the cause and propagation of Carnatic music in North America in various ways – as an educator, global artist, composer, and collaborator.

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Albert SchrauwersAlbert Schrauwers,  PhD
Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology
York University

Albert Schrauwers conducts anthropological research in Canada and Indonesia. His research interests include kinship, ethnic group formation, colonialism, and the role of religion in the development of civil society. He has written extensively on marriage, households and development in the highlands of Central Sulawesi, including a book on colonial reformation in the highlands between 1892 and 1995 published in 2000. His nineteenth century communitarian Awaiting the Millennium: The Children of Peace and the Village of Hope, 1812-1889 was published in 1993.

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Sharada SrinivasanSharada Srinivasan,  PhD
Assistant Professor, International Development Studies
York University

Sharada Srinivasan is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Social Science where she teaches Development Studies. Her research is focused on two broad themes: gender, culture and violence; and young people and development. She is currently working on daughter elimination and children's experience of gender discrimination and gender violence. She has written on dowry, domestic violence and daughter elimination in India and has published in World Development, Economic and Political Weekly and Journal of Development Studies. She is the author of Daughter Deficit: Sex Selection in Tamil Nadu (New Delhi: Women Unlimited, 2012).

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Yukari TakaiYukari Takai, PhD
Department of History
Glendon College, York University

Yukari Takai, professor of history at Glendon College, is establishing herself as an expert on the history of migration and demographic change. Her most recent study of migratory patterns into and throughout the Quebec/New England region in the 19th and 20th centuries offers a new framework for examining the immigrant experience. She has studied and taught in Canada and Japan, and as a Fulbright Research Scholar at the Center for the Study of Ethnicity & Race at Columbia University in New York City.

Her current research concerns Asian transborder migration along the Canadian and Mexican Border during the Period of Exclusion (1882-1943), and gender, work and migration (Asians and French Canadians in the Twentieth Century).

She was a contributor to Migrants and Migration in Modern North America: Cross-Border Lives, Labor Markets, and Politics (eds. D. Hoerder and N. Faires, Duke University Press, 2011) and is the author of Gendered Passages: French-Canadian Migration to Lowell, Massachusetts, 1900-1920 (Peter Lang, 2008).

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Alicia TurnerAlicia Turner, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Humanities
York University

Alicia Turner specializes in the study of Buddhism in Southeast Asia with an emphasis on the period of British colonialism in Burma/Myanmar. Her research focuses on the intersections of religion, colonialism and nationalism.

Seeking to understanding the cultural aspects of British colonialism and how it transformed local ideas and categories, she investigates the key role religion played in the colonial encounter, both as an ordering category for colonial rule and as a mode of response. Her work on Buddhist lay movements in Burma from 1890 to 1920, studies issues of education, the performance of respect and campaigns for moral reform. Her current projects also include a study of the Cetiyingana debate between Ledi Sayadaw and Okpo Sayadaw over footwear in pagodas and a collaborative project on Europeans Buddhist monks at the turn of the twentieth century.

She is also the editor of The Journal of Burma Studies.

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Penny Van Esterik

Penny Van Esterik, PhD
Professor, Department of Anthropology
York University

Professor Van Esterik is a cultural anthropologist who has done most of her research in Southeast Asia (Thailand, Lao PDR and Indonesia) with additional field experience in Kenya, Colombia, United States and Canada.

Research interests include nutritional anthropology, gender and development, and advocacy anthropology. She has published several books on Southeast Asian topics, including Cognition and Design Production in Ban Chiang Painted Pottery (1981), Women in Southeast Asia (1982, republished in 1996), Taking Refuge: Lao Buddhists in North America (1993 republished in 2002), Materializing Thailand (Berg, Oxford, 2001), in addition to articles on infant feeding, food symbolism, Theravada Buddhism, Southeast Asian refugees and material culture. Her most recent book is Food and Culture in Southeast Asia (Greenwood Press 2008).

Long term research concerns infant feeding among the urban poor in developing countries (Beyond the Breast-Bottle Controversy, Rutgers University Press, 1989), and advocacy work on women's health (Women, Work, and Breastfeeding, 1992, Risks, Rights and Regulations: Communicating about Risk and Infant Feeding, 2002).

As a founding member of WABA (World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action), she combines academic writing with advocacy writing for public use internationally.

She is currently following up on several projects, including advocacy communication about risk and infant feeding (in the face of commerciogenic contamination and HIV/AIDS), Lao food security and natural resource management (with Peter Vandergeest), and Others in our Midst, a project exploring how concepts of cultural difference are first introduced in introductory anthropology classes and textbooks in different countries (and what this might tell us about teaching and studying at York University).

 

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Peter Vandergeest


Peter Vandergeest, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Geography
York University

Peter Vandergeest specializes in the areas of political ecology, environmental sociology and the cultural politics of environment and development.

His recent publication, co-edited with Chusak Whittayapak, is The Politics of Decentralization in Southeast Asia (Mekong Press 2009). He is also co-editor of Constructing the Countryside (1996) and has published a number of articles in refereed books and journals on resource rights, the social aspects of forestry, and the political ecology of shrimp aquaculture.

His current research focuses on governmentality and forest politics in Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand as well as and regulatory practices in shrimp aquaculture in Thailand and India. He is co-investigator in a SSRCH-MCRI project on 'Challenges of Agrarian Transition in Southeast Asia' (2005-2010) and Principal Investigator for 'Privatizing Environmental Governance: A Global Analysis of the Effects and Effectiveness of Environmental Certification for Farmed Salmon and Shrimp', supported by SSHRC.

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Bernie Wolf

Bernard Wolf,
PhD
Professor, Economics, Schulich School of Business
York University

Professor Wolf's areas of expertise include international trade and finance, multinational enterprises, strategic alliances, economic integration and trade/investment liberalization in North America, Europe and Asia. His research projects focus on China, Korea and Japan and the role they play in the world economy. He has published and presented several papers on the automotive industry, intellectual property rights, currency and exchange rate issues, joint ventures and international business.

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Wendy Wong

Wendy Wong, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Design
York University

Wendy Wong is the author of Hong Kong Comics: A History of Manhua (2002) published by Princeton Architectural Press. She has published four books for Chinese readers funded by the Hong Kong Arts Development Council. Her articles appeared in Design Issues, Journal of Design History, Journal of Popular Culture, International Journal of Comic Art, Journal of Gender Studies, Mass Communication and Society and Graphis Magazine.

Her curated exhibit, "Chinese Design. Everyday" was held at the Design Exchange, Toronto in Spring 2008. She served as a visiting scholar at Harvard University from 1999 to 2000, and was the 2000 Lubalin Curatorial Fellow at the Cooper Union School of Art, where she curated an exhibit entitled "Chinese Graphic Design towards the International Sphere." In 1998, she was the recipient of the Asian Cultural Council Grant, an affiliate of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund. She received a SSHRC Standard Research Grant for her research on the history of Chinese graphic design in 2004. She taught in Hong Kong and the United States before she moved to York University.

Her research and teaching interests include: Chinese visual cultural history and studies, Asian comics and animation studies, Chinese mass media studies, Chinese consumer society, design and identity, design and public awareness, cross-cultural/hybrid design, emerging design technologies and lifestyle studies, globalization and transnational studies.

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Yuk-lin Renita Wong, PhD
Associate Professor, School of Social Work
York University

Professor Yuk-Lin Renita Wong has worked to deconstruct the postcolonial and racial power relations in knowledge production and discursive practices in social work. Her publications include a critique of the discourse of spirituality in social work and of cultural competence. Her writings also focus on centering marginalized voices and ways of knowing/being, including mindfulness-based critical social work pedagogy, East and Southeast Asian immigrant/refugee women’s conceptions of mental health, and the indigenization of social work with women in China.

She is currently working with an ethno-specific mental health agency in developing a self-help initiative model for East and Southeast Asian mental health consumer/survivors. Internationally, she has served as International Consultant in a 'Women's Studies Curriculum Development in China' Project (2000-2005), and as Senior Scholar at the Department of Sociology and Social Work at Zhongshan (Sun Yat-sen) University in Guangzhou, China (Fall 2005). She is currently involved in a participatory action research project on the post-disaster community rebuilding and cultural restoration of ethnic minority communities in one of the earthquake-afflicted areas in Sichuan China.

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Lorna Wright

Lorna Wright, PhD
Associate Professor, International Business
Schulich School of Business
York University

Lorna Wright has been active in cross-cultural and diversity consulting for over 30 years, offering training in cross-cultural and multicultural management and negotiations, as well as organizational development and strategy formulation. She has conducted seminars, given guest lectures and conference presentations around the world.

She is currently working on a research project on "Small and Medium Enterprise (SME) International Development and the Role of Electronic Networks" and Partnering Strategies for Canadian SMEs in Southeast Asia." She has published a number of case studies and articles on e-business, SME training strategies, women entrepreneurship, cultural competence, among others, and co-authored a book on International Management Behavior: Putting Policy into Practice (1992).

She was the founding director (1992-2000) of the Centre for Canada-Asia Business Relations at Queen's University. She was also co-founder (1997) of the Asian Business Consortium, which included Queen’s University, York University, the University of Toronto, and Ivey School of Business.

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Xueqing Xu

Xueqing Xu, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics
York University

Dr. Xu holds a BA and MA in Chinese Literature from Fudan University in Shanghai, and a PhD in Chinese Literature from the University of Toronto (2000). She is an associate professor in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics at York University. Her research interests are in Chinese-Canadian literature and Chinese women fiction. Her current research project is  “From “Day of Shame” to “Canada Day”: Reflections on Chinese-Canadian Identity and Home in the Tai Hon Kong Bo/Chinese Times.”

Among her publications are A Life of Confucius (1990) and several articles on Chinese-Canadian literature during the past few years. She contributed ca. 500 entries to an encyclopedia of modern Chinese literature and a chapter to a book on Chinese literary societies during the Republican Era (2008). She also edited an anthology of prose by Chinese-Canadian writers in 2005.

She was the organizer of the 2010 International Symposium on Chinese-Canadian Literature, which was held at York University in July 2010.

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Qiang ZhaQiang Zha, PhD
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Education
York University

Qiang Zha is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Education, York University. He holds a PhD in Higher Education, earned at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. As a Chevening Scholar, he received a Master of Art degree in Comparative Education from the University of London Institute of Education in 1994. In 1996, he was a visiting scholar to the Faculty of Education, University of Hong Kong.

His research interests include comparative higher/education, international academic relations, globalization and education, the internationalization of higher education, East Asian and Chinese higher education, differentiation and diversity in higher education, theories of organizational change, research methods in education, global brain circulation, global citizenship education, issues with new immigrants settlement. He has written and published widely on these topics. In 2004, he was a co-recipient of the UNESCO Palgrave Prize on Higher Education Policy Research.

In the past three years, Professor Zha focused his research on a SSHRC-supported project, 'China’s Move to Mass Higher Education: Implications for Democratization and Global Cultural Dialogue'. This project studied China’s move to mass higher education in terms of the policy making process and the empirical experience. Its major findings are reported in a book titled Portraits of 21st Century Chinese Universities: In the Move to Mass Higher Education, co-authored by Ruth Hayhoe, Jun Li, Jing Lin and Qiang Zha.

Qiang Zha is an affiliated member of the York Centre for Education and Community, and Centre of Excellence on Research on Immigration and Settlement (CERIS) – The Ontario Metropolis Centre. He is also a concurrent professor/research fellow with Nanjing Normal University, Institute of Higher Education Studies at Fudan University, and Center for Development Studies of the Anhui Provincial Government in China.

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