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Jean Augustine Chair in Education, Community & Diaspora

The Conversation Canada Podcast: How to spark change within our unequal education system

The Conversation Canada Podcast: How to spark change within our unequal education system

Carl James, professor of education at York University and Kulsoom Anwer, a high school teacher who works out of one of Toronto's most marginalized neighborhoods, Jane and Finch, were on The Conversation Canada Podcast episode 3 to discuss the injustices and inequalities in the education system – and the way forward.

In the media: 'I couldn't let it go': How the expulsion of a Black student led a former vice-principal to quit

In the media: 'I couldn't let it go': How the expulsion of a Black student led a former vice-principal to quit

For 13 years, Paul Raso experienced different challenges working as a teacher and vice-principal in one of Toronto's most marginalized communities, but it was the way his school board handled the expulsion of one Black student — and the departure of that student's brother, as well — that Raso says finally pushed him to leave.

Educators to discuss education of Black youth at annual Jean Augustine Chair event, Feb. 24

Educators to discuss education of Black youth at annual Jean Augustine Chair event, Feb. 24

The annual Black History Month celebration presented by the Jean Augustine Chair in Education, Community and Diaspora in the Faculty of Education will feature a discussion on "The Education of Black Youth: A National Conversation with Educators" on Feb. 24, from 7 to 9 p.m. All are welcome to attend this free event.

The Jean Augustine story: Claiming a seat at the table

The Jean Augustine story: Claiming a seat at the table

When former MP Jean Augustine (LLD '11) was elected to the Parliament of Canada in 1993, she brought with her the hopes of her community, the voices of those she advocated for and the aspirations of her ancestors. As the first Black woman elected as a Member of Parliament, she was automatically catapulted to the status of role model for the millions who would come after her.