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The Justice Crisis: The Cost and Value of Accessing Law

The Justice Crisis: The Cost and Value of Accessing Law

The Justice Crisis: The Cost and Value of Accessing Law book cover

Despite wide recognition that access to justice is one of the most basic rights of democratic citizenship, unfulfilled legal needs are at a tipping point in many parts of the Canadian justice system and around the world. High legal fees, complex and expensive administration, lack of funding, political inattention, insufficient research and education, and a relatively uninformed public feed into the problem.

The Justice Crisis assesses what is and isn’t working in efforts to improve access to civil and family justice. Meaningful access is often a question of providing pathways to resolving everyday legal issues. The availability of justice services that aren’t only tied to the courts and lawyers – such as public education on the law, alternative dispute settlement, and paralegal support – is therefore an important concern.

Year of Publication: 2020
Publisher website
Co-Editor: Lesley A. Jacobs
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