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Jamaican-Creole

Learn Jamaican Creole–an English-based Creole language with influences from West Africa– from a born-and-raised native speaker. Evolving on the slave plantations the 17th century, Jamaican Creole is today spoken primarily by people living in Jamaica and Jamaicans around the world.

Learn to read and write in Jamaican Creole. Hone your conversational skills in Jamaican Creole and gain exposure to a wide variety of topics, from learning about the evolution of Jamaican music, theatre, religious beliefs and much more. Our courses are taught by Clive Forrester, a respected academic and native Jamaican Creole speaker who has done extensive research on the language.

Fall/Winter 2021-2022 Course Enrolment

When registering for classes on the Course Timetable website, be sure to carefully read through the "Notes/Additional Fees" section of each course you select. This section contains important details on delivery methods for each course during the Fall/Winter 2021-2022 term. Remember that REMT & ONLN are completely online courses and LECT, TUT, BLEN, SEMR and LGLC could have in-person components.

Courses

Description: This course serves as an introduction to Jamaican Creole and is meant for students with no background in the language. It will develop basic oral, conversational, reading, and writing skills in the language.

Description: This course is specifically designed for individuals who have some knowledge of Jamaican Creole. It seeks to develop further students' proficiency in the language as well as to provide students with a deeper understanding of how the language works.

Prerequisite: AP/JC 1000 6.00 (Introduction to Jamaican Creole) or some knowledge of Jamaican Creole.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to Fall 2009

Prerequisite: AS/JC 1000 6.00 (Introduction to Jamaican Creole) or some knowledge of Jamaican Creole.

Course credit exclusion: AS/JC 2000 6.00.

Description: Examines the relationship between Jamaican discourse and several of its artforms, including, but not limited to oral folklore, literature and music. Participants critically investigate the language heritage of Jamaica specifically from the perspective of some of its cultural artforms.

Questions?

Contact Clive Forrester at clivef@yorku.ca for help with academic and administrative questions.