Skip to main content Skip to local navigation

AP/HUMA 1105 9.00 Myth And Imagination In Greece And Rome

AP/HUMA 1105 9.00 Myth And Imagination In Greece And Rome

Home » Classical Studies » Courses » AP/HUMA 1105 9.00 Myth And Imagination In Greece And Rome

AP/HUMA 1105 9.00

Myth And Imagination In Greece And Rome

The mythical narratives of the ancient Greeks and the Romans constitute a continuous tradition that extends from before the reach of history to the present day. Myths survive in literary texts and visual art because their narratives have continued proved compelling and fascinating in different languages, historical eras, and social contexts (the myths of Odysseus, Heracles, and Oedipus are just a few examples). Literature and art of all kinds have been inspired to retell and represent their stories, while the search for the meaning of mythic stories has informed and profoundly influenced a great range of intellectual disciplines including literary criticism, anthropology, and psychoanalysis. In these ways, myths have and continue to exercise a fundamental influence on western culture and, in consequence, even today they maintain a certain cosy familiarity. On the other hand, the historical contexts in which the Greeks and Romans told and retold these mythical narratives are to us in the twenty-first century culturally alien and unfamiliar.

Categories: