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Our Experts in the Media

Our faculty are thought leaders undertaking ground-breaking research around the most relevant issues facing humanity today. They are often asked to comment on issues impacting society and contribute to discussions on current events. Browse through recent media where LA&PS professors have been called upon for their expertise.

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Low-income seniors say they've been ignored this election

A national strategy which addresses provincial, territorial and municipal infrastructures as basic as affordable housing and accessible public transit is needed to better support Canada’s older population, suggests Professor Pat Armstrong, a leading expert in long-term care.

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Federal election 2021: More supply won’t solve Canada’s housing affordability crisis

Promises to build more homes is not a meaningful solution to Canada’s housing affordability crisis, notes Joel Roberts Social & Political Thought PhD candidate: "High house prices are not due to supply shortages."

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Ugly Anti-Masker Protests Plague Canadian Election

It’s unsurprising that the anti-vaccine and anti-lockdown protesters are targeting Justin Trudeau’s events, notes Professor Cary Wu, as political ideology is the single best predictor of pandemic behaviours, such as mask wearing.

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Jagmeet Singh says ending for-profit long-term care will be ‘less costly.’ Why it’s not necessarily that simple

While government funding helps non-profit operators build capital, it doesn't necessary benefit taxpayers explains Professor Pat Armstrong: “We are paying for a building that then they own in the end.”

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‘Fifty Shades of Grey,’ 10 years later: Self-publishing wasn’t novel then, but now it’s easier to reach a niche audience

Over the past 10 years, the publishing industry has seen a rise in self-published books, indicating that it could have a permanent place in the publishing ecosystem according to Communication & Culture PhD candidate Elizaveta Poliakova.

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Hurricane Ida shows the increasing impact of climate change since Katrina

 "While no two disasters are the same, looking at differences between past and present disasters can help us to better understand what is needed to prepare for future disasters" explains Professor Jack Rozdilsky.

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Pandemic changes spark rage and debate on social media

The lack of affordable housing, province-wide lockdowns and vaccinations are the most prevalent issues that have been brought up during the pandemic and created a division among Ontarians, notes Professor Yvonne Su.

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With COVID-19 restrictions lifting, ‘immune-insecure’ people have to navigate added risks in social life

“COVID-19 has exacerbated existing inequalities, creating pathways of harm and destruction that reflect socioeconomic differences, structural racism and hazardous living conditions,” says Professor Michael Nijhawan.

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Long-term care after the COVID-19 disaster: 3 promising ways to move forward

LA&PS researchers Professor Pat Armstrong and Ruth Lowndes note increased family councils, recognition of families' contributions to care & the necessity of social care as promising developments in long-term care post-pandemic.

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Black Inclusion Matters: Changing the culture of an institution

“Progress demands a fundamental shift in the way we think and in the way York operates as a university,” says Professor Andrea Davis, a special advisor on York University’s Action Plan on Black Inclusion.

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How emojis are enhancing our communication

How can emojis enhancing our communication? “They could replace some of the cues that are missing” from text messages and emails says Linguistics professor Sheila Embleton.  

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Pandemic’s Impact on the Pride Community

School of Social Work professors Nick Mulé and Kinnon Ross MacKinnon speak with CTV News reporter Angie Seth about the lack of health care access for 2SLGBTQIA people, what has changed over the last 40 years and what still needs to happen.

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Long-Term Care: “We know what needed to be done, we just haven’t done it.”

“We know what needed to be done, we just haven’t done it."  COVID-19 exposed shocking conditions in Canada's long term care system but, according to Professor Pat Armstrong, these conditions predate the pandemic.

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Bringing art into public spaces can improve the social fabric of a city

Public art has the power to challenge us to confront social issues and spark important conversations about the world around us. Social & Political Thought PhD candidate Rhiannon Cobb explains how art can create change.

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Get ready for the pandemic tattoo boom

Why do we get tattoos? "It's a kind of living history...a literal marker, of something significant to the person getting it," explains sociologist Professor Deborah Davidson.

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York University Canada Research Chairs to study Indigenous history and Black studies

Professors Christina Sharpe and Alan Corbiere have been appointed as new Canada Research Chairs (CRC) at York University, while Professor Christopher Kyriakides has received a renewal of his CRC appointment.

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Study on Anishinaabe ways of knowing could transform universities' knowledge creation

After winning a major grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, Professor Carolyn Podruchny's study exploring Indigenous ways of knowing could help transform universities' knowledge creation. 

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After a year of Zoom meetings, we’ll need to rebuild trust through eye contact

"Trust after Zoom will be tough," says Professor David Weitnzer on life after a year of virtual meetings and gatherings. "But projecting trustworthiness and friendship in places where we are used to being more transactional can help." 

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How two Toronto women are reshaping what it means to be South Asian and taking that message worldwide

For many South Asian women, the struggle to balance their cultural and Canadian identity can be a challenge, notes Professor Tania Das Gupta: "I think that there is a tug of war inside the young people, particularly the women." 

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Did the pandemic shake Chinese citizens’ trust in their government?

Has the pandemic shaken Chinese citizens' trust in their government? "Empirical research, including mine, has shown that the Chinese government’s handling of the pandemic has actually boosted its legitimacy," says Sociologist Professor Cary Wu. 

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'Emotional turmoil': Managing mental health amid ongoing anti-Asian hate

People in racialized communities are often always seen as foreigners, notes Sociology Professor Cary Wu: “A lot of people are still being asked, ‘Where are you from?’ ‘What kind of language do you speak?’ 

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Drive-through simulation helps agencies in Canada and U.S. to vaccinate more people

As cities and towns across North America grapple with the logistics of administering COVID-19 vaccines, a drive-through vaccination simulation developed by Professor Ali Asgary, in collaboration with the Laboratory for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, is helping plan for effective mass vaccinations. 

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Trailblazing report offers policy solutions for long-term care during COVID-19 and beyond

Throughout the pandemic, Ontario's long-term care homes have been hit with devastating outbreaks of COVID-19. In a new report for The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA), Professor Pat Armstrong and her co-authors propose strategies to address this historic crisis. 

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Nanny state? Hardly. Canada has left its foreign caregivers in a stalled system that’s derailing lives, critics say

“All caregivers want is to be treated like other immigrants to Canada and be able to come and live with their families,” labour migration researcher Professor Ethel Tungohan tells the Toronto Star, weighing in on the immigration pathway for foreign caregivers. 

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History of racism, exclusion colours provincial election for Indigenous Sask. residents

Even though First Nations people can now all vote, history has caused divides that continue today, says Professor Lesley Jacobs, research chair in human rights & access to justice. 

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Halloween is ‘gay Christmas’ for many in the LGBTQ community. This year, it's been canceled.

The gay community helped turn Halloween into the adult party holiday that it is today, says History Professor Emeritus Nicholas Rogers. 

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‘A crazy system’: U.S. voters face huge lines and gerrymandering. How Elections Canada makes a world of difference north of the border

Amid hours-long lineups for voters, scrutiny of the U.S. electoral process is at an all-time high.  Politics Professor Dennis Pilon and the Toronto Star look at some of the ways the American and Canadian system compare. 

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Nurse recounts 'grim sight' at Que. long-term care where dozens died during first wave

The pandemic has revealed a pattern of lower staffing levels and higher deaths in for-profit nursing homes, says Professor Pat Armstrong. The leading expert in eldercare sat down with @CTVW5 to discuss the state of Canada's long-term care system

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